Tag: western australia

Preseason testing results: Which State has the best hops?

THE current sporting hiatus serves as somewhat of an extended preseason for the nation’s brightest AFL Draft prospects, who will be itching to get back on the field. Aside from a few scratch matches on the eve of Round 1, much of the 2020 class has had little in the way of competition thus far.

But preseason testing always serves to get the competitive juices flowing, with players from each region and academy coming together to test where they rate athletically. Rookie Me hosted the preseason testing in Victoria, South Australia, Queensland and Tasmania, while the AFL completed testing in Western Australia and NSW/ACT.

In our next analysis of the results from those days around the country, we take a look at the standing and running vertical jump scores and try to answer the question of ‘Which State has the best hops?’. We have compiled the top 10 scores from each State, an overall top 10, and averages from around the nation to help answer the question.

>> SCROLL DOWN FOR THE OVERALL TOP 10’s

>> CATCH UP ON PREVIOUS RESULTS:

20m Sprint
Agility Test
Yo-yo test

STATE TOP 10’s

NEW SOUTH WALES

Standing Vertical Jump:

1. Lachlan Squire (GWS GIANTS Academy) – 80cm
=2. Gaige Saunders (GWS GIANTS Academy) – 76cm
=2. Lenny Robin (Sydney Swans Academy) – 76cm
4. Jordan Endemann (Sydney Swans Academy) – 69cm
=5. Macauley Smith (GWS GIANTS Academy) – 68cm
=5. Hamish Gilmore (GWS GIANTS Academy) – 68cm
=7. Jack Driscoll (GWS GIANTS Academy) – 67cm
=7. Alexander Kourakis (Sydney Swans Academy) – 67cm
=7. Marco Rossmann (Sydney Swans Academy) – 67cm
10. Noah Clarke (GWS GIANTS Academy) – 66cm

Top 10 Average: 70.4cm
State Average:
59.8cm

Running Vertical Jump (R):

1. Fraser Kelly (GWS GIANTS Academy) – 83cm
2. Lachlan Squire (GWS GIANTS Academy) – 80cm
=3. Austin Ball (Sydney Swans Academy) – 79cm
=3. Jacob Bauer (Sydney Swans Academy) – 79cm
=5. Macauley Smith (GWS GIANTS Academy) – 78cm
=5. Jordan Endemann (Sydney Swans Academy) – 78cm
7. Isaiah Olsen (Sydney Swans Academy) – 77cm
=8. Maximus Monaghan (GWS GIANTS Academy) – 75cm
=8. Kye Pfrengle (Sydney Swans Academy) – 75cm
=8. Thomas Longmire (Sydney Swans Academy) – 75cm

Top 10 Average: 77.9cm
State Average: 
66.2cm

Running Vertical Jump (L):

1. Eddie Marning (Sydney Swans Academy) – 89cm
2. Kye Pfrengle (Sydney Swans Academy) – 86cm
=3. Lachlan Squire (GWS GIANTS Academy) – 85cm
=3. Matthew McKenzie (Sydney Swans Academy) – 85cm
=5. Coopa Steele (GWS GIANTS Academy) – 83cm
=5. Hamish Gilmore (GWS GIANTS Academy) – 83cm
=7. Scott Brown (GWS GIANTS Academy) – 82cm
=7. Lenny Robin (GWS GIANTS Academy) – 82cm
9. Fraser Kelly (GWS GIANTS Academy) – 81cm
=10. 80cm x3

Top 10 Average: 83.6cm
State Average: 
71.5cm

QUEENSLAND

Standing Vertical Jump:

1. Jack Briskey (Brisbane Lions Academy) – 77cm
2. Ethan Kerr (Brisbane Lions Academy) – 73cm
3. Riley Buckland (Gold Coast SUNS Academy) – 72cm
4. Jayren Willie (Gold Coast SUNS Academy) – 71cm
=5. Damon Eastwell (Brisbane Lions Academy) – 69cm
=5. Caleb Hammond (Brisbane Lions Academy) – 69cm
=7. Jack Willis (Gold Coast SUNS Academy) – 68cm
=7. Nathan Davis (Brisbane Lions Academy) – 68cm
=9. Reed Maskell-Dobbin (Brisbane Lions Academy) – 67cm
=10. 66cm x2

Top 10 Average: 70cm
State Average:
60.1cm

Running Vertical Jump (R):

1. Riley Buckland (Gold Coast SUNS Academy) – 85cm
=2. Shaye Walsh (Gold Coast SUNS Academy) – 83cm
=2. Jed Foggo (Gold Coast SUNS Academy) – 83cm
=4. Finn Brown (Gold Coast SUNS Academy) – 82cm
=4. Jack Willis (Gold Coast SUNS Academy) – 82cm
6. James Packer (Brisbane Lions Academy) – 80cm
7. Damon Eastwell (Brisbane Lions Academy) – 79cm
8. Tahj Abberley (Brisbane Lions Academy) – 77cm
9. Charlie Bowes (Brisbane Lions Academy) – 76cm
10. Jayren Willie (Gold Coast SUNS Academy) – 75cm

Top 10 Average: 80.2cm
State Average: 68.4cm

Running Vertical Jump (L):

1. Riley Buckland (Gold Coast SUNS Academy) – 93cm
2. Jack Briskey (Brisbane Lions Academy) – 90cm
3. Damon Eastwell (Brisbane Lions Academy) – 87cm
4. Lochlan Harrop (Brisbane Lions Academy) – 86cm
5. Kuot Thok (Brisbane Lions Academy) – 85cm
=6. Reed Maskell-Dobbin (Brisbane Lions Academy) – 82cm
=6. Tahj Abberley (Brisbane Lions Academy) – 82cm
8. Jack Willis (Gold Coast SUNS Academy) – 81cm
=9. Bodhi Uwland (Gold Coast SUNS Academy) – 80cm
=9. Nathan Davis (Brisbane Lions Academy) – 80cm

Top 10 Average: 84.6cm
State Average: 71.6cm

SOUTH AUSTRALIA

Standing Vertical Jump:

1. Harvey Bock (West Adelaide) – 75cm
=2. Jordan Kasianowicz (WWT) – 73cm
=2. Nick Tape (South Adelaide) – 73cm
=2. Henry Read (Sturt) – 73cm
=5. Liam Ueding (WWT) – 71cm
=5. Bailey Griffiths (West Adelaide) – 71cm
=5. Logan Mulady (North Adelaide) – 71cm
=5. Samuel Duke (Norwood) – 71cm
=5. Tom Powell (Sturt) – 71cm
=10. 70cm x3

Top 10 Average: 71.9cm
State Average:
58.5cm

Running Vertical Jump (R):

1. Matthew Borlace (Central District) – 92cm
=2. Jordan Kasianowicz (WWT) – 89cm
=2. Lachlan Jones (WWT) – 89cm
4. Tom Powell (Sturt) – 88cm
=5. Zabien Parker-Boers (Sturt) – 87cm
=5. Declan Hortle (Sturt) – 87cm
=7. Aston Woods (West Adelaide) – 86cm
=7. Lachlan Grubb (Central District) – 86cm
9. Henry Read (Sturt) – 84cm
=10. 81cm x2

Top 10 Average: 86.9cm
State Average:
66.1cm

Running Vertical Jump (L):

1. Henry Read (Sturt) – 91cm
=2. Kane Viska (Glenelg) – 90cm
=2. Lachlan Grubb (Central District) – 90cm
=4. Ned Walter (Sturt) – 89cm
=4. Tom Powell (Sturt) – 89cm
6. Elliott McNamara (North Adelaide) – 88cm
7. Zabien Parker-Boers (Sturt) – 87cm
=8. Jase Burgoyne (WWT) – 86cm
=8. Lachlan Jones (WWT) – 86cm
=8. Lewis Cowham (Central District) – 86cm

Top 10 Average: 88.2cm
State Average:
70.1cm

TASMANIA

Standing Vertical Jump:

=1. Sam Collins (North Hobart) – 68cm
=1. Darcy Gardner (Clarence) – 68cm
3. Isaac Chugg (Lauceston) – 67cm
=4. Will Peppin (North Hobart) – 63cm
=4. George McLeod (North Hobart) – 63cm
=4. Lachlan Blakemore (Penguin) – 63cm
7. Harry Ireland (North Hobart) – 62cm
=8. Jackson Callow (North Launceston) – 61cm
=8. Jared Dakin (Launceston) – 61cm
=10. 60cm x3

Top 10 Average: 63.6cm
State Average:
56.4cm

Running Vertical Jump (R):

1. Isaac Chugg (Launceston) – 82cm
2. Dominic White (North Hobart) – 80cm
3. Harry Ireland (North Hobart) – 79cm
=4. Will Peppin (North Hobart) – 75cm
=4. Patrick Walker (North Hobart) – 75cm
6. Sam Collins (North Hobart) – 74cm
7. Blade Sulzberger (Prospect) – 73cm
=8. Jared Dakin (Launceston) – 72cm
=8. Darcy Gardner (Clarence) – 72cm
10. Oliver Davis (Clarence) – 71cm

Top 10 Average: 75.3cm
State Average:
64.8cm

Running Vertical Jump (L):

1. Will Peppin (North Hobart) – 86cm
2. Darcy Gardner (Clarence) – 83cm
3. Sam Tilley (Lauderdale) – 79cm
4. Jayden Hinds (Launceston) – 78cm
5. Isaac Chugg (Launceston) – 76cm
6. Jake Steele (North Hobart) – 75cm
7. Sam Collins (North Hobart) – 74cm
8. Sam Banks (Clarence) – 73cm
9. Lachlan Blakemore (Penguin) – 72cm
=10. 71cm x4

Top 10 Average: 76.7cm
State Average:
68.9cm

VICTORIA

Standing Vertical Jump:

1. Luke Gaudion (Eastern) – 84cm
2. Aidan Hare (Bendigo) – 76cm
=3. Josh Goater (Calder) – 73cm
=3. Jonah Potter (Northern) – 73cm
=3. Lachlan Carrigan (Sandringham) – 73cm
=6. Jonty Patrick (Calder) – 72cm
=6. Michael Ktona (Calder) – 72cm
=6. Giorgio Varagiannis (Oakleigh) – 72cm
=9. 71cm x3

Top 10 Average: 73.7cm
State Average:
57.2cm

Running Vertical Jump (R):

1. Archie Perkins (Sandringham) – 92cm
2. Giorgio Varagiannis (Oakleigh) – 89cm
3. Luke Kelvie (Oakleigh) – 88cm
=4. Lachlan Bond (Bendigo) – 85cm
=4. Scott Bielby (Oakleigh) – 85cm
=4. Dominic Akuei (Northern) – 85cm
=4. Harrison Keeling (Eastern) – 85cm
=8. 84cm x4

Top 10 Average: 86.1cm
State Average:
67.3cm

Running Vertical Jump (L):

1. Jamarra Ugle-Hagan (Oakleigh) – 93cm
2. Dominic Bedendo (Murray) – 91cm
=3. Noah Walsh (Bendigo) – 90cm
=3. Giacomo Thomas (Calder) – 90cm
=3. Lachlan Godden (Oakleigh) – 90cm
=3. Luke Gaudion (Eastern) – 90cm
=7. Nash Reynolds (Western) – 89cm
=7. Sam Berry (Gippsland) – 89cm
=7. Joshua Gibcus (GWV) – 89cm
=7. Noah Gadsby (Geelong) – 89cm

Top 10 Average: 90cm
State Average:
72.2cm

WESTERN AUSTRALIA

Standing Vertical Jump:

1. Tristan Hurford (Claremont) – 84cm
2. Seth Roberts (Claremont) – 82cm
3. Joel Western (Claremont) – 80cm
4. Zac Meloncelli (Perth) – 77cm
=5. Angus Fraser (South Fremantle) – 76cm
=5. Solomon James (South Fremantle) – 76cm
=5. Darcy Dixon (West Perth) – 76cm
=8. Aidan Hall (South Fremantle) – 75cm
=8. Caleb Stephens (South Fremantle) – 75cm
=8. Rohan Scurria (West Perth) – 75cm

Top 10 Average: 77.6cm
State Average:
58.3cm

Running Vertical Jump (R):

1. Chayse Grabe-Paparone (Subiaco) – 100cm
2. Noah Farrow (West Perth) – 95cm
3. Bailey Jenkin (Swan Districts) – 92cm
=4. Zac Trigwell (Peel Thunder) – 91cm
=4. Zac Sanderson (Perth) – 91cm
6. Rohan Scurria (West Perth) – 89cm
=7. Joel Western (Claremont) – 88cm
=7. Corey Warner (East Fremantle) – 88cm
9. Jordan Berry (West Perth) – 87cm
=10. 86cm x3

Top 10 Average: 90.7cm
State Average:
66.7cm

Running Vertical Jump (L):

1. Tristan Hurford (Claremont) – 99cm
=2. Brandon Walker (East Fremantle) – 94cm
=2. James Sullivan (Swan Districts) – 94cm
=4.Seth Roberts (Claremont) – 92cm
=4. Angus Fraser (South Fremantle) – 92cm
6. Joel Western (Claremont) – 91cm
=7. 90cm x5

Top 10 Average: 92.2cm
State Average:
71.3cm

OVERALL TOP 10’s

Standing Vertical Jump:

=1. Tristan Hurford (Claremont) – 84cm
=1. Luke Gaudion (Eastern Ranges) – 84cm
3. Seth Roberts (Claremont) – 82cm
=4. Joel Western (Claremont) – 80cm
=4. Lachlan Squire (GWS GIANTS Academy) – 80cm
=6. Jack Briskey (Brisbane Lions Academy) – 77cm
=6. Zac Meloncelli (Perth) – 77cm
=7. 76cm x6

Running Vertical Jump (R):

1. Chayse Grabe-Paparone (Subiaco) – 100cm
2. Noah Farrow (West Perth) – 95cm
=3. Bailey Jenkin (Swan Districts) – 92cm
=3. Matthew Borlace (Central District) – 92cm
=3. Archie Perkins (Sandringham) – 92cm
=6. Zac Trigwell (Peel Thunder) – 91cm
=6. Zac Sanderson (Perth) – 91cm
=8. 89cm x4

Running Vertical Jump (L):

1. Tristan Hurford (Claremont) – 99cm
=2. Brandon Walker (East Fremantle) – 94cm
=2. James Sullivan (Swan Districts) – 94cm
=4. Riley Buckland (Gold Coast SUNS Academy) – 93cm
=4. Jamarra Ugle-Hagan (Oakleigh) – 93cm
=6. Seth Roberts (Claremont) – 92cm
=6. Angus Fraser (South Fremantle) – 92cm
=8. Henry Read (Sturt) – 91cm
=8. Dominic Bedendo (Murray) – 91cm
=8. Joel Western (Claremont) – 91cm

STATE AGAINST STATE AVERAGES

Standing Vertical Jump:

1. QLD – 60.1cm
2. NSW – 59.8cm
3. SA – 58.5cm
4. WA – 58.3cm
5. VIC – 57.2cm
6. TAS – 56.4cm

Running Vertical Jump (R):

1. QLD – 68.4cm
2. VIC – 67.3cm
3. WA – 66.7cm
4. NSW – 66.2cm
5. SA – 66.1cm
6. TAS – 64.8cm

Running Vertical Jump (L):

1. VIC – 72.2cm
2. QLD – 71.6cm
3. NSW – 71.5cm
4. WA – 71.3cm
5. SA – 70.1cm
6. TAS – 68.9cm

Draft Central All-Star Teams: East Perth

EAST Perth’s All-Star side does not necessarily have the depth of some others, but it has a good core of elite talents through the midfield, and very strong key position players. One of the greatest rucks of the modern era captains the side in Dean Cox after he won the All-Star Player voting via our Instagram stories this week. The Royals have a total of 12 100-game players and the remaining 12 in the best 24 are made up of those who played between 33-98 games. Luke Webster‘s 33 games is the lowest of any player in an All-Star side to-date.

Please note: The All-Star Team is only those players AFL achievements during the AFL Draft era. Therefore, legends such as Polly Farmer or Kevin Murray in East Perth’s case are not included.

THE TEAM:

Looking at the team on face value, it has an elite ruck, some terrific midfielders and a strong spine that would make it difficult to match-up on. Its abundance of talls, or medium-talls who could play as key position players mean it is top-heavy in terms of height, but would stretch any opposition defence.

DEFENCE:

The defence would be centred around 1990 premiership defender, Michael Christian. Standing at centre half-back, the former Magpie played 131 VFL/AFL games and was a tough opponent to beat in duels. Along with Hawthorn captain and three-time premiership talent, Ben Stratton, the duo provide some strong leadership in the back six. The other player to have played more than 100 games in the defence is Marcus Seecamp, who managed 140 games often playing off half-back or pushing up to a wing.

The other three players tip in at just under the century mark, with Essendon key position defender, Tayte Pears playing out of full-back, while 90-game Essendon defender Michael Prior sits at half-back. Matt Clape – 87 games, 62 goals – also makes it into the back six, though he also spent time in other areas of the ground, hence the 62 goals to-boot. Gavin Rose is a player on the bench who could provide some rotation through that back six if required.

MIDFIELD:

The clear strongest point of the side, the midfield has some high quality midfielders led by Cox in the ruck. The West Coast Eagles star won a whopping six All-Australians, as well as a best and fairest in his time across 290 games. Joel Corey (276 games, two All-Australians, two best and fairests and three premierships) and Mitch Duncan (203 games, three premierships) hand the onball brigade plenty of success to drive the rest of the side.

Through the centre line is Eagles’ 2018 Grand Final hero and renowned tagger, Mark Hutchings to provide that defensive role, as well as the inexperienced but talented, Sam Powell-Pepper. Powell-Pepper’s 57 games is the second lowest of any starter in the side, but he adds value to the team. On the other wing is David Bain who played the 98 games and booted 48 goals, but won a best and fairest which earns him the gig over others around the same mark. Rupert Betheras, Paul Peos and Peter Cransberg could rotate through the midfield or forward to provide some extra depth in the area.

FORWARD:

Gigantic. That is one way of putting it with five of the six starters either key position players or just about key position players. Aside from the talented Andy Lovett (88 games, 93 goals), the remainder of the team is considered talls or key position players, led by West Coast champion, Ross Glendinning. He is the centrepiece of the attack, booting 325 goals in 230 games, though he could also play as a key defender too. He won a Brownlow, two best and fairest’s and an All-Australian in his career. He lines up with Craig Starcevich, a Collingwood premiership player and now Brisbane Lions AFL Women’s coach. Starcevich booted 178 goals in 144 games during his career.

Filling out the other three spots are Adelaide’s Ian Perrie, Brisbane and Essendon’s Matthew Leuenberger and West Coast’s Troy Wilson. Leuenberger will play second ruck to Cox after the injury-prone talent managed 137 games during his career. He will share that load and resting forward with Alex Ishchenko (142 games). Wilson played just the 37 games – the least of any starter in an All-Star team so far – but booted 83 goals in that time. Perrie kicked 129 goals in 116 games with the Crows.

DEPTH:

With each player about 30 games used for the team, the depth is not great, though the Royals had a further 10 players reach double-figure VFL/AFL games in their career during the AFL Draft era. Brady Anderson (27 games), Nick Kommer (22) and Stephen Hooper (22) are the next in line in terms of games, while the more recent Jackson Ramsay (17) and Jarrad Oakley-Nicholls (13) also hailed from the club.

Preseason testing analysis: Which State is the most agile?

THE current sporting hiatus serves as somewhat of an extended preseason for the nation’s brightest AFL Draft prospects, who will be itching to get back on the field. Aside from a few scratch matches on the eve of Round 1, much of the 2020 class has had little in the way of competition thus far.

But preseason testing always serves to get the competitive juices flowing, with players from each region and academy coming together to test where they rate athletically. Rookie Me hosted the preseason testing in Victoria, South Australia, Queensland and Tasmania, while the AFL completed testing in Western Australia and NSW/ACT.

In our next analysis of the results from those days around the country, we take a look at the agility test scores and try to answer the question of ‘Which State is the most agile?’. We have compiled the top 10 scores from each State, an overall top 10, and averages from around the nation to help answer the question. Stay tuned for results across each test in the near future.

>> SCROLL DOWN FOR THE OVERALL TOP 10

STATE TOP 10’s

New South Wales:

1. Jordan Endemann (Sydney Swans Academy) – 8.23 seconds
=2. Cooper Wilson (Sydney Swans Academy) – 8.26
=2. Oscar Davis (Sydney Swans Academy) – 8.26
4. Harry Grant (GWS GIANTS Academy) – 8.306
5. Matthew McKenzie (Sydney Swans Academy) – 8.36
6. Fraser Kelly (GWS GIANTS Academy) – 8.367
7. Thomas Longmire (Sydney Swans Academy) – 8.41
8. Harrison Grintell (GWS GIANTS Academy) – 8.414
9. Marco Rossmann (Sydney Swans Academy) – 8.43
10. Kai Watts (GWS GIANTS Academy) – 8.441

Top 10 Average: 8.347 seconds (6th)

The Swans Academy again makes up most of the NSW top 10, with six talents making up the list – including the entire top three. Jordan Endemann again showcased his athleticism with the quickest time, while top-aged academy standout Marco Rossmann also snuck into the rankings. Harry Grant was GWS’ niftiest mover, clocking up a 8.306-second effort, with 2019 Under-16 State MVP Kai Watts rounding out the list. NSW was one of just two states not to boast a time under eight seconds.

Queensland:

1. Tahj Abberley (Brisbane Lions Academy) – 7.84 seconds
=2. Darcy Prest (Brisbane Lions Academy) – 7.86
=2. Caleb Hammond (Brisbane Lions Academy) – 7.86
4. Riley Buckland (Gold Coast SUNS Academy) – 7.97
5. Kirk McGrory (Brisbane Lions Academy) – 8.18
6. Billy Evers (Gold Coast SUNS Academy) – 8.19
7. Damon Eastwell (Brisbane Lions Academy) – 8.22
8. Will Tasker (Brisbane Lions Academy) – 8.23
9. Lochlan Harrop (Brisbane Lions Academy) – 8.24
10. Shaye Walsh (Gold Coast SUNS Academy) – 8.25

Top 10 Average: 8.084 seconds (2nd)

It was hardly a surprise to see Tahj Abberley again not only feature among the elite ranks for Queensland, but to also claim top spot for his scintillating 7.84-second run. A number of players also made their second and third features on top 10 lists with fantastic times, as the Lions’ academy made up for 70 per cent of the top 10, including the entire podium. The Queenslanders’ elites were the second-quickest on average.

South Australia:

1. Lachlan Grubb (Central District) – 7.94 seconds
2. Connor Willsmore (Sturt) – 8.05
3. James Willis (North Adelaide) – 8.06
4. Nasiah Wanganeen (Glenelg) – 8.11
=5. Jordan Kasianowicz (WWT Eagles) – 8.16
=5. Connor Blackwell (West Adelaide) – 8.16
7. Luke Mitton (South Adelaide) – 8.20
8. Jacob Godden (WWT Eagles) – 8.24
=9. Antonio Zappia (Norwood) – 8.25
=9. Riley Hughes (Central District) – 8.25

Top 10 Average: 8.142 seconds (4th)

SA Academy Hub gun Lachlan Grubb utilised every bit of his athletics background to notch his state’s best time as the sole athlete to clock in at under eight seconds. He, and fellow Bulldog Riley Hughes bookended the 10, while the likes of Connor Willsmore and Luke Mitton made yet another appearance among the top ranks. The Croweaters were once again middle of the road overall through, coming in fourth when compared to other states’ best figures.

Tasmania:

1. Isaac Chugg (Launceston) – 8.04 seconds
2. Jayden Hinds (Launceston) – 8.14
3. Will Peppin (North Hobart) – 8.17
4. Kye Chilcott (Launceston) – 8.26
5. Oliver Davis (Clarence) – 8.29
=6. Sam Tilley (Lauderdale) – 8.31
=6. Sam Foley (Launceston) – 8.31
8. Jack Rand (Devonport) – 8.32
9. Patrick Walker (North Hobart) – 8.34
10. Darcy Gardner (Clarence) – 8.38

Top 10 Average: 8.256 seconds (5th)

Former athletics ace Isaac Chugg was yet again the standout for Tasmania with his outstanding time of 8.04 seconds, though he could not quite become the only Tasmanian to sneak in under eight seconds. Allies Academy Hub members Oliver Davis and Patrick Walker put in solid showings with their times of around the 8.30-second mark, while former Academy member Will Peppin featured on the podium.

Victoria:

1. Blake Reid (Geelong Falcons) – 7.76 seconds
2. Charlie Lazzaro (Geelong Falcons) –  7.79
3. Harrison White (Western Jets) – 7.83
4. Oliver Wiltshire (Geelong Falcons) – 7.90
=5. Harvey Gallagher (Bendigo Pioneers) – 7.92
=5. Sam Butler (GWV Rebels) – 7.92
7. Bailey Laurie (Oakleigh Chargers) – 7.97
8. Harrison Keeling (Eastern Ranges) – 7.98
=9. 7.99 x3

Top 10 Average: 7.905 seconds (1st)

The quickest top 10 on average across the nation was Victoria, which was the sole state to have every time clock in at under eight seconds. Geelong Falcons products stood out among the massive talent pool, featuring thrice in the top four, with Blake Reid and Charlie Lazzaro managing the best two times. Oakleigh midfield/forward jet Bailey Laurie also ran well, coming in seventh as one of two National Academy members on the list.

Western Australia:

1. Ty Sears (Swan Districts) – 7.92 seconds
2. Jayden Peak (East Perth) – 8.02
=3. Seth Roberts (Claremont) – 8.08
=3. Zac Sanderson (Perth) – 8.08
5. Bailey Jenkin (Swan Districts) – 8.14
6. Saverio Marafioti (West Perth) – 8.18
=7. Denver Grainger-Barras (Swan Districts) – 8.19
=7. Zach Fleiner (West Perth) – 8.19
=7. Rohan Scurria (West Perth) – 8.19
10. Lyle Sibasado (Swan Districts) – 8.22

Top 10 Average: 8.121 seconds (3rd)

One of the top states in terms of their elite runners was again Western Australia, despite only having one athlete run the test in less than eight seconds. Ty Sears was that player, topping the list as one of four Swan Districts products to feature. Top WA draft hopeful Denver Grainger-Barras was one of three players to manage a time of 8.19 seconds, impressive for a key defender.

OVERALL TOP 10

1. Blake Reid (Geelong Falcons) – 7.76 seconds
2. Charlie Lazzaro (Geelong Falcons) –  7.79
3. Harrison White (Western Jets) – 7.83
4. Tahj Abberley (Brisbane Lions Academy) – 7.84
=5. Darcy Prest (Brisbane Lions Academy) – 7.86
=5. Caleb Hammond (Brisbane Lions Academy) – 7.86
7. Oliver Wiltshire (Geelong Falcons) – 7.90
=8. Harvey Gallagher (Bendigo Pioneers) – 7.92
=8. Sam Butler (GWV Rebels) – 7.92
=8. Ty Sears (Swan Districts) – 7.92

An absolutely rapid top 10 was dominated by Victorians, who made up for each podium place and over half of the list overall. Reid and Lazzaro were joined by Harrison White in the top three, with Queenslander Abberley the best non-Victorian runner, followed by two of his fellow Brisbane Academy teammates. Sears made it three states represented, sneaking into the 10 as the lone West Australian.

STATE AGAINST STATE:

1. Queensland – 8.55
2. Victoria – 8.56
3. Tasmania – 8.69
4. South Australia – 8.76
5. NSW/ACT – 8.82
6. Western Australia – 8.89

While Victoria may have dominated the top 10, having the largest talent pool brought its overall average down – albeit only to second place. Queensland proved the best state for sideways movement, edging into top spot while Tasmania filled out the podium. In a change from the yo-yo and 20m sprint results, Western Australia and NSW/ACT were the worst ranked states, even despite the former boasting a very good top 10.

East Perth Player of the AFL Era: Vote for yours via our Instagram

EAST Perth are up next in our Player of the AFL Era series which will be run through our Instagram channel starting at 12.30pm today. The East Fremantle All-Star voting was completed yesterday with Ben Cousins announced as the winner and co-captain of the Sharks’ All-Star side with fellow finalist, Simon Black. Looking at East Perth’s side, there are a few elite talents that clearly stand out, and then a number of really strong contributors across their AFL careers to make a solid spine. Led by one of the best rucks of the modern era in Dean Cox, East Perth might not have the numbers of successful draftees as others, but have still produced some quality players.

The voting will run over the next four days starting today, with the winner to be decided by Wednesday night (unless extra time and the full 24 hours is needed in the final vote). The next club involved in the voting process is Geelong Falcons starting on Friday. All eligible players were selected thanks to the Draft Guru site.

East Fremantle Player of the AFL Era: Vote for yours via our Instagram

EAST FREMANTLE are up next in our Player of the AFL Era series which will be run through our Instagram channel starting at 12.30pm today. The Eastern Ranges All-Star voting was completed yesterday with Sam Mitchell announced as the winner and captain of the Ranges’ All-Star side. Looking at East Fremantle’s side, it is absolutely bursting with talent, so much so some 200-gamers miss out on the top 16 voting. With nine All-Australians, seven best and fairests, two Brownlow Medals and four premierships between them, Ben Cousins and Simon Black are seeded first and second, while Josh J Kennedy and Aaron Sandilands are among an elite group of talents.

The voting will run over the next four days starting today, with the winner to be decided by Wednesday night (unless extra time and the full 24 hours is needed in the final vote). The next club involved in the voting process is East Fremantle starting on Sunday next week. All eligible players were selected thanks to the Draft Guru site.

AFL Draft Watch: Nathan O’Driscoll (Perth/Western Australia)

IN the build up to football eventually returning, Draft Central  takes a look at some of this year’s brightest names who have already represented their state at Under 17 or Under 18s level in 2019. While plenty can change between now and then, we will provide a bit of an insight into players, how they performed at pre-season testing, and some of our scouting notes on them from last year.

Next under the microscope in our AFL Draft watch is Perth Demons’ product Nathan O’Driscoll, who already looms as one of Western Australia’s top draft prospects for 2020. The 18-year-old has some handy role models to feed off en route to his AFL dream, with older sister Emma already playing at the elite level for Fremantle, while former Perth teammate Deven Robertson was drafted to Brisbane on the back of a Larke Medal-winning campaign for the Black Ducks.

O’Driscoll already has some notable experience under his belt too, having earned All-Australian honours at Under-16 level in 2018, running out as a bottom-ager for Western Australia at last year’s Under 18s carnival, and starred in the Under-17 All-Stars showcase on AFL Grand Final Day. He featured mostly on the outside or off half-back with the step-up in competition, but has his eyes set on some more midfield minutes in 2020.

The 187cm prospect has a penetrating boot which he uses to gain good meterage, making him a fantastic attacking threat from behind the ball or out of the middle. The thing that sets O’Driscoll apart though is the addition of his work going the other way, with hard tackling and shrewd reading of the play also part of his well-rounded game. Having only dropped below 20 disposals once at WAFL Colts level in 2019, O’Driscoll is primed to become a key member of each side he suits up for in 2020.

PRESEASON TESTING HIGHLIGHTS:

Standing Vertical Jump: 67cm
Running Vertical Jump (R/L):
86cm/80cm
Speed (20m): 2.99 seconds
Agility: 8.46 seconds
Endurance (Yo-yo):
21.8

PLAYER PAGE:

Nathan O’Driscoll

Height: 187.0cm
Weight: 76.1kg
Position: Half-back/midfield

2019 WAFL COLTS STATS: 7 games | 25.1 disposals | 4 marks | 7.6 tackles | 0 goals
2019 UNDER 18 NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS STATS: 3 games | 16 disposals | 1.7 marks | 6.7 tackles | 3 clearances | 2.6 inside 50s

Strengths: Contested ball, kick penetration, tackling, endurance, burst

SCOUTING NOTES:

2019 Under 17 Futures All Star game

By: Peter Williams

Spread well to win the ball in all thirds of the ground and found plenty of it, particularly early. He took a strong mark at half-forward in the first term and then won a lot of his touches at half-back as the game turned against his side. He would play the defensive side of the wing to mop up and kick long, providing a release option for his side going forward.

2019 WAFL Colts Round 17 vs. Subiaco

By: Lenny Fogliani

The 2018 AFL Under 16s All-Australian defender showed off his versatility by playing as a midfielder for the Demons. Against Subiaco, O’Driscoll collected a team-high 29 possessions, laid an equal-game high 10 tackles, grabbed five marks and recorded three inside 50s to be Perth’s best on a tough morning.

2019 Under 18 National Championships vs. Vic Country

By: Lenny Fogliani

Another bottom-age prospect, O’Driscoll was brilliant on the half-back line for the Sandgropers. He finished with 21 possessions, six tackles, four marks, four inside 50s and two rebounds, providing good zip on the outside and damaging run forward.

2018 WAFL Colts Round 21 vs. Subiaco

By: Lenny Fogliani

The Northam product was superb in the midfield for the Demons with 27 possessions, eight tackles and two marks. On a bleak day for Perth fans, O’Driscoll was a beacon of light with his ball-winning ability, composure, and skill execution all on display.

AFL Draft Diary: Jack Allen

AS the nation waits in anticipation for COVID-19 restrictions to be eased, young draft hopefuls hope that they will be able to return to competitive action in the second half of 2020 and playing the game that comes naturally to them.

Following the excellent AFL Draft Diary by Swan Districts midfielder Zane Trew last month comes another entry by a fellow Black Duck in Jack Allen. The 18-year-old is an athletic ruck-forward who has also spent time deep in defence. A main strength of the youngster lies in his tremendous vertical leap which he uses to his advantage as he can take the footy at the highest point.

In 2019, Allen combined Colts with Swans with school footy duties at Guildford Grammar and it was there that he developed full confidence in his game. He then brought that momentum back to Swan Districts where he was consistently one of their best players in the latter part of their season.

Allen displays his love of footy throughout this fascinating reflective piece, as does his appreciation for the individuals that he has learnt from in his footy journey to date and his excitement in reuniting with his teammates once more.

AFL Draft Diary by Jack Allen

For me, footy has always been more than just game day.

It has been about spending time with my teammates, training together, refining my craft, working on my fitness, and supporting my teammates to do the same.

The start of the 2020 football season has been the exact opposite of this. It has been about the individual, it has been about training in isolation, pushing myself to do better than I did the day before. It has been about reflecting on my skillset, identifying what I need to work on, identifying the best training drills to improve these areas, and then putting those adjustments in place.

In isolation has this been hard? Absolutely.

I have been running before work, and completing training drills and bodyweight drills after work. I have taken my footy down to the local oval and practiced kicking goal after goal from a range of different positions across the 50, refining my skills.

And most of these times it has been eerily quiet at the oval, just me and my footy. It is such a direct contrast to the sounds of mates having a kick-to-kick, and teammates both screaming for the ball and taking screamers on each other during team training sessions.

Do I think this period of isolation will make me a better footy player? Absolutely.

Why? Because while I have always been driven, and while I have always loved the game of football, this period of isolation has given me an even greater appreciation for the game. I miss football. I miss what it is, what it means and how it makes me feel.

I have been part of the Swan Districts Football Club for the past five years, after joining their development program at 14 years of age.

I have really enjoyed my time with the club and have been appreciative of the opportunities they have afforded to me. I have especially enjoyed the opportunities to work with the different coaching staff, and of course club stalwart Percy Johnson.

Percy has had a huge impact on my development as both a footballer and as an individual. I am very thankful of the time that he has invested in my development and am looking forward to training with him again when the current restrictions end.

2020 has been identified as the year I need to make an impact and demonstrate to those that have been scouting me that I can play AFL football. 2019 had seen me play limited WAFL football for my club Swan Districts due to PSA sporting commitments at Guildford Grammar.

While Guildford may not have had a very successful year, I was very happy with the growth in my game, both on and off the field, and I am looking forward to a successful 2020 with Swan Districts Football Club. I am looking forward to demonstrating my skills as both an individual player, and as a team player.

And, finally, I cannot wait to train with my teammates, support my teammates, continue to develop my skill set and run out onto the oval for that very first game this season.

That first touch on the field, that first goal- it will make it all worth it.

Like it always does.

Newcomer Viney grows in short space of time

EIGHTEEN months ago, Rebecca Viney was running around for North Beach Football Club in Western Australia. While the Tigers are considered Western Australia’s most successful amateur team, it was a far cry from the AFL Women’s competition which at that stage was in its second season. It is hard to believe just two years later, Viney could be running around in just that – the elite level competition – after producing a remarkable rise to represent her state at the Under-18 Championships.

“I started footy last year in an amateur league,” Viney said. “So I played for North Beach Football Club and I just did it because I wanted to have a go at footy and I really enjoyed it and had a lot of fun and I managed to at the end of the season win the best player of the whole comp which was really surprising, but that’s what lead me on to go further and take the State Academy and come here.”

Viney said she loves running around with her teammates and experiencing the camaraderie that comes with Australian rules football. While she has the ultimate goal of getting drafted, she is not getting too far ahead of herself given her limited experience in the code.

“I’d love to go as far as AFLW but right now I just want to keep improving my skills and getting the best out of what I can,” she said. “My strengths are mainly are on the ground picking up ball and using my speed. “I want to keep improving my skills, my handballs, getting that efficiency.”

Viney said she was lucky in the sense she did not have as much travelling to do as some of her West Australian teammates, hailing from the city. But when she did cross the country for the Under-18 Championships, she loved it.

“(It’s a) whole new experience and I’m loving it,” Viney said. “Especially being exposed to the Victorian girls and their game and see how we compare to them. “I just want to keep improving my game like I said and each game keep improving on what I’m doing and learning from the coaches and implementing that in a game.”

As for an inspiration to follow, she has looked at her local West Australian Women’s Football Leagu club, Subiaco.

“Personally I think I look up to some of the AFLW girls,” Viney said. “At the moment playing at Subi, there’s Dana Hooker down there sometimes and she’s a really good player and I love watching her and it’s really cool.”

Late bloomer O’Driscoll eyes elite level

ONLY still new to footy Emma O’Driscoll is taking each moment as it comes and enjoying the ride despite being an overager. O’Driscoll was a late bloomer to the sport and has not put a foot wrong since her inception into the game, steadily developing and posing a dominant threat credit to her skill.

“So I only started playing footy last year, so in Year 12 – which was in 2017 – I went to school country week,” O’Driscoll said. Just a week of football at the school country week and then one of the ‘Deggers’ – Clint Degebrodt came up to me and gave me a state invitation and I thought I’ll go and try out for the state 18s and that summer I did their academy and then made it to the state 18s team last year, and then I made it again this year as an overager so that was really exciting.

The talented footballer is hoping to remain in her home state with the Eagles and Dockers both viable options considering her breakout season and connection to both clubs with the youngster receiving text messages and calls from the rival clubs throughout the WAFL season.

“I think it’s great, I think it just shows that the game is developing so much and obviously it gives us girls in WA a lot more opportunity having two teams to be able to go to,” she said. “I was part of the West Coast Eagles Academy so I was training with those girls and signed girls every Tuesday throughout the season which was great, got feedback from the coaches constantly. “Freo have been the exact same, ringing me, checking up on me if I did get injured and they were always making sure everything was all good and I was looked after which has been amazing. Both clubs were very supportive.”

Despite going for the Eagles her whole life, O’Driscoll is open to the chance of either Western Australia side to pick her up and has been inspired by a host of AFLW players along the journey.

“AFLW is a bit different, I literally support everyone, Tayla Harris is probably my favourite player so there’s a bit of Carlton there but I love the Dockers in the AFLW,” she said. “Kara ‘Juddy’ [Donnellan], she’s the captain of the Dockers, she was my Swan Districts coach at my WAFL club, she’s just been amazing, calls me ‘champ’, will message me all the time. “Checks up on me and we just have that good kind of communication going so I’ll message her if I can’t come to training and things like that, yeah she’s been a really really great help.”

Having spent a large portion of her life playing netball the switch to footy was slightly challenging for the Western Australian with the sport posing a heap of new challenges physically and mentally.

“Most importantly my kicking, was the main thing I got told to work on, fitness-wise it would be the 2km, I haven’t been used to running that long distance you know, I’ve had a 30m court that I’ve had to run on instead of a big oval so they were the main things and feedback that I got back from the coaches,” she said.

Aware of her areas of improvement O’Driscoll has toiled away to address the issues in her game play to further develop her skills and become a commanding figure on the footy field.

“I definitely think I have been working harder this year, I think because last year was my first season I was kind of settling in and getting to know everyone whereas this year I know the game a lot better so being able to implement those things at training was a lot easier for me to do and I was more familiar with the coaches,” she said. “I think I am fitter, in terms of my 2km I’ve cut my time down which was one of my major goals, not comparing myself to other people and just trying to work on my own 2km time trial so that was good. In terms of kicking I’m getting there, slowly, but I think by having more exposure to the game I’ll be able to improve that a lot more.”

Gifted with the opportunity to play for and represent Western Australia, O’Driscoll has loved every moment taking on a leadership role of sorts and injecting herself into the footy culture.

“Oh it’s been amazing, probably one of the best experiences I’ve ever had,” she said. “I think the first year it was a lot different to obviously netball, so coming over and just the footy culture is fantastic and I’ve enjoyed every minute of playing in the State 18s with the girls and I think this year being older in that team has kind of allowed me to have a leadership role which I’ve really enjoyed so yeah it’s been great,” she said.

With the league expanding and the possibility of two clubs vying for her services the 19-year-old’s main aim is to get drafted and put her best foot forward highlighting her hard work and skill across the oval.

“I think I really just want to push myself and show that I have a really good work ethic and I’m willing to work as hard as I can and kind of step up to the level of AFLW,” she said.

Scouting notes: AFL U18 Championships – Allies vs. Western Australia

IN a see-sawing game, Western Australia ran out the stronger of the two sides in the game against the Allies, who booted three of the first four goals before the Sandgropers piled on seven consecutive majors to take home their second win from three games. Peter Williams checked out the game and his opinion-based notes on some of the standouts are below.

Allies:

#3 Connor Budarick

So composed with ball in hand, Budarick showed a terrific burst out of the middle early in the game to kick inside 50 to a dangerous spot. He applied defensive pressure throughout laying a massive number of tackles, and rose high to clunk a big contested grab on the wing. Budarick had a shot on goal in the third term after being the quickest to react to a Noah Cumberland mark, but his shot missed. Had another chance in the final term from a tight angle and tried to set it up to a teammate, but the Western Australia defence saw it coming and spoiled it over the line.

#4 Malcolm Rosas Jr

The highlights package, and almost-highlights from this game was unbelievable. Time and time again, Rosas Jr looked like he was about to tear the game open, whether it be through his blistering runs, his terrific side steps, or his high-flying grabs. He pulled out all the tricks in an eye-catching performance. Rosas kicked an early goal in the first term after contesting a ball in midfield and running forward, then set Josh Gore up for another after selling candy and dancing around a couple of players to kick perfectly into space. A couple of other chances in the first half were either marked or hit the post, but he looked ever dangerous. In the third term, Rosas Jr took a five-bounce run from half-forward deep into attack but took one too many bounces and lost control. He followed up with a couple of tackles, but the run was terrific. He did it again in the final term, taking a number of bounces of half-back, burning an opponent then side-stepping another and giving it off. Flew high in his final act of the game, could not quite take it then laid a big tackle.

#5 Braeden Campbell

Just a really clever player and one who looks dangerous in the forward half. He can hurt opposition players in the air or at ground level, and does not need much time and space to create something. He reads the taps and attempts to spin out of trouble, quickly putting boot to ball. Had a chance to do so in the second term for a major but it was touched on the way through, then had another chance in the third term through a snap but hit the post. Finished with a couple of behinds, but looked dangerous.

#9 Mitch O’Neill

A standout four-quarter performance from the Tasmanian who brings others into the game with his elite kicking and decision making. O’Neill is so composed under pressure and clean at ground level or in the air, and takes the risky kick that can backfire, but with his skill often puts pressure on the opposition defence. An example was his spearing pass straight down the guts to Noah Cumberland who took a huge mark. Often O’Neill dictates to his teammates down the field where to lead or when to fly for marks by his kicks. Made very few mistakes in a really outstanding performance.

#22 Tom Green

Played his usual role with some time in defence as well, mostly using his big frame to outmuscle the West Australian midfielders. He won a number of important clearances and dumped the ball forward, winning a lot of possessions around the ground. His work rate is terrific and showed off his versatility by playing in defence in the final term. He does not take a backwards step and has terrific hands in close, continually working hard.

#31 Hamish Ellem

Continually battled hard in the forward 50, spending time in the ruck and more so after Sam Gaden went off early in the third term. He had a number of opportunities but again could not capitalise, kicking a few behinds. He did set Josh Gore up for a goal in the final term, putting the ball nicely in front of him to convert the chance. He held his own in the ruck contests when he did and had a heavy workload at times against the highly rated Luke Jackson.

#37 Josh Gore

A talented forward, Gore is not a huge possession winner, but he makes the most of his opportunities. He slotted a great goal in the opening term, then broke the drought early in the fourth with a terrific goal. He was tight against the boundary line, used strength at the hips to shrug off an opponent and snap around his body to put it through the middle. He had another set shot in the second term after dispossessing West Australian captain Deven Robertson, but missed to the right.

#44 Nicholas Brewer

Held his own against the dangerous Elijah Taylor, even though Taylor did get off the chain more late in the game. He produced the top defensive effort of the match by running down the electric Taylor, continuing to chase 40m even after the forward had eluded him once, and his work rate saw him drag him down as he kicked to save a goal.

#51 Sam Gaden

Came off the ground early in the third term after what had been a really impressive performance against Luke Jackson in the ruck. While he knew Jackson had the athleticism, Gaden had the body strength and used it to his advantage at stoppages, working hard particularly at boundary throw-ins to outmuscle his opponent and give the midfielders first touch. He used the ball pretty well around the ground and was able to have a couple of inside 50s to dangerous positions. It was no surprise Western Australia got on top once he came off and Jackson had a lot more free reign at the stoppages.

Western Australia:

#3 Tyrone Thorne

There is not much of the lightweight forward, but his ability to hook the ball around the goal when having set shots from tight angles on his left was almost “Bend it like Beckham” style. He finished the game with three goals from four set shots, and while he was not a huge possession winner, played the role of permanent small forward perfectly.

#4 Riley Garcia

An accumulator by hand, Garcia wins a lot of his touches with deft handballs in close. He did his best work running hard on the outside and trying to take the game on, moving nicely around the stoppages. He almost sold himself into trouble at one stage in the third term, but remained composed and gave off the handball to a running teammate whilst Garcia was being hemmed in by three opponents. He hit up a teammate inside 50 in the final term and kicked it long down the wing well.

#5 Liam Henry

Another player in the game who looked always dangerous whenever the ball was in his area, the Fremantle Next Generation Academy Player had some really impressive touches at both ground level and in the air. He dropped an early mark and was turned over, but the next chance he got he learnt from the first error and clunked it at the highest point. He later roved a ball well off a pack and kicked it to a teammates’ advantage whilst Henry was under pressure. A quick thinker, Henry used the ball well, setting up a Tyrone Thorne goal in the second term and a Callum Jamieson goal in the fourth term with perfect kicks to their advantage. He only needs a second to dispose of the ball, and has lightning quick hands. At one stage he thought a bit too quickly in the first term, overrunning the ball or “spending it before he had it” but did back up with a defensive effort. He had a shot on goal in the final term but the shot went across the face in the dying seconds. A prospect who has a lot of upside.

#6 Cameron Anderson

Really stepped up into the game in the second term, working between the arcs with some impressive runs. He sold some candy and got past an opponent running inside 50 but his shot was touches on the line. He showed neat skills across half-back and then spent time up forward to lead out and take a good mark. He set up the leading Logan McDonald with a nice pass in the third term, then began a scoring chain in the fourth quarter with the nous to take on the man on the mark to draw an opponent and handball away to give the outnumber up the field.

#10 Deven Robertson

A work horse who put in a four-quarter performance once again. His strengths include his hands around the stoppages and his no-fear attitude towards the contest. He has game smarts and class to know his surroundings, and a high level of spacial awareness which was exemplified by his ability to wheel around in the final term and hit-up Tristan Hobley in space. There are still areas to develop, with Robertson dispossessed on a number of occasions, and the kicking under pressure was scratchy at times. What was impressive about Robertson’s game was he was able to take the game on from half-back and kept trying to gain metres for his side going forward. He was solid with the ball when having time and space. Has very quick hands and was important at the clearances.

#17 Jeremy Sharp

Had a mixed bag performance on the day, with some terrific vision and slicing 45-degree passes, and then some strange out-on-the-full kicks. His vision and delivery when given time and space is very impressive, and is clean at ground level. It is his kicking under pressure when forced to rush in congestion, or when at full speed being hunted down by opposition players that could be tightened up. He worked hard throughout and found the ball plenty in the first three quarters, roaming in all thirds of the ground. Set up a number of scoring chains and had lightning hands to give to a teammate with the disguised handball in close, before finishing the game off with a long-range goal from outside 50 in the dying seconds of the third term.

#19 Elijah Taylor

An exciting forward who was always looking like kicking a bag, and while he was well contained in the first half by Nicholas Brewer, got off the chain in the second half. His first goal did come in the first term from kicking across his body after missing a set shot 40m out when it hit the behind post. He had a chance for a second by leading into space 30m out on a 45-degree angle but his kicked just missed to the right. After half-time his influence on the game blew up, selling candy for a terrific goal. He took a mark, looked to play-on to his right, waited for his opponent to commit, then swung back to his left and never looked liked missing with a terrific kick. He booted his third in the dying minutes with a snap around the body. He dropped a potential mark, but followed up with a clean one-grab off the ground and snap off his left around the body. Taylor knows how to use the ball well under pressure.

#25 Logan McDonald

A talented bottom-age key forward, McDonald showed some great signs inside 50. He lead out at the right times and looked sure with his hands. He did kick out on the full from a snap early in the game, but worked into the match with a goal from a set shot 35m out on a tight angle. He had another chance on the opposite side but pulled it to the far left. He worked hard up the ground to take a couple of nice marks leading out along the wing and half-forward.

#32/#37 Luke Jackson

Had a jumper change midway through the game, and ended up coming from the field after an unlucky clash in the dying minutes deep in attack. Early on he had an intense battle with Sam Gaden, outmuscled at times at the stoppage, but was doing well around the ground with some good tackles and nice work at ground level to fire away quick handballs. He stamped his authority on the game in the second half once Gaden was off the ground, too athletic and nimble for Hamish Ellem and Liam Delahunty who were forced to play a more part-time shared role through the ruck rather than pinch-hit as they had before.

#35 Trent Rivers

Uses the ball well and had a solid game, with a big first quarter and a quieter second term, before working hard throughout the third and fourth quarters to win the footy. He has great vision and game awareness to set up scoring plays, and is able to use his slick skills to hit-up teammates leading out up forward. He won a vital one-on-one contest against Hewago Paul Oea on the wing, which would have been dangerous for the West Australians if he lost with a paddock in front of Oea. Rivers bumped his opponent off the ball and then with pressure coming, he had the composure to handball to a teammate and keep it moving. Remains composed with ball-in-hand and makes the right decisions.

#36 Denver Grainger-Barras

Another bottom-age tall who will hold the West Australian side in good stead for next year, he has some neat defensive and offensive attributes. He killed a contest at half-back with a great spoil across the line, and proceeded to be an intercepting defender throughout the game, saving a number of dangerous forward entries by dropping into the hole. Most importantly, he remained composed under pressure and looks like a promising prospect for next year, pushing up the ground to kick inside 50 at one stage late in the game.