Tag: vic country

AFLW U18 Championships Team Profile: Vic Country

AFTER the Victorian sides were announced yesterday, we take a look at how the Vic Country players performed this season statistically and some of their key traits. The Country side has some strong midfielders and a consistent defence, as well as some classy players. Among those leaders in the side are Lucy McEvoy, Molly McDonald, Millie Brown and Sophie Molan who all captain their respective sides. The 29-player squad includes a number of middle-agers (not eligible for the draft until next year) who have been marked with an asterisk.

#1 Elise Vella
Geelong Falcons | Outside Midfielder | 156cm

The speedy winger might not be tall, but she provides the Falcons with some great run on the outside, and adds a point of difference to a midfield that has plenty of potency. Works well between the arcs, getting the ball from midfield inside 50.

NAB League Girls

SeasonTeamKHBDMCPUPTHOCLRI50R50GLGMKHDMHOTGDC Points
2019Geelong Falcons6541106110021002351106.54.110.61.10.02.10.137
Total-6541106110021002351106.54.110.61.10.02.10.137

Career Total

SeasonKHBDMCPUPTHOCLRI50R50GLGMKHDMHOTGDC Points
20196541106110021002351106.54.110.61.10.02.10.137
Total6541106110021002351106.54.110.61.10.02.10.137

 

#2 Teagan Brett
Murray Bushrangers | Balanced Midfielder | 157cm

Buzzes around the contest and manages to get out of contested situations due to her size and ability to slip free of tackles. Gets to the right positions to win the ball and get it forward.

NAB League Girls

SeasonTeamKHBDMCPUPTHOCLRI50R50GLGMKHDMHOTGDC Points
2019Murray Bushrangers733210511002400105098.13.611.71.20.02.70.038
Total-733210511002400105098.13.611.71.20.02.70.038

Career Total

SeasonKHBDMCPUPTHOCLRI50R50GLGMKHDMHOTGDC Points
2019733210511002400105098.13.611.71.20.02.70.038
Total733210511002400105098.13.611.71.20.02.70.038

 

#3 Paige Sheppard
Geelong Falcons | Balanced Midfielder | 158cm

Another Falcons midfielder who wins the ball on the inside or outside, and can give her forwards best opportunities. A terrific kick, she is able to hit-up targets with pinpoint passes going inside 50, averaging more than five inside 50s a game, but also works hard defensively, laying four tackles per game.

NAB League Girls

SeasonTeamKHBDMCPUPTHOCLRI50R50GLGMKHDMHOTGDC Points
2019Geelong Falcons1165517120004500461031011.65.517.12.00.04.50.364
Total-1165517120004500461031011.65.517.12.00.04.50.364

Career Total

SeasonKHBDMCPUPTHOCLRI50R50GLGMKHDMHOTGDC Points
20191165517120004500461031011.65.517.12.00.04.50.364
Total1165517120004500461031011.65.517.12.00.04.50.364

 

#4 Renee Saulitis*
GWV Rebels | Small Forward/Defender | 163cm

A small forward who has been tested down back, the bottom-age talent from the Rebels uses the ball well and has quick disposal by hand or foot. Saultis moves well and provides Country with the versatility to play her up either end. One of the highest goalsenses going around.

NAB League Girls

SeasonTeamKHBDMCPUPTHOCLRI50R50GLGMKHDMHOTGDC Points
2019GWV Rebels5296114001900122495.81.06.81.60.02.10.430
Total-5296114001900122495.81.06.81.60.02.10.430

Career Total

SeasonKHBDMCPUPTHOCLRI50R50GLGMKHDMHOTGDC Points
20195296114001900122495.81.06.81.60.02.10.430
Total5296114001900122495.81.06.81.60.02.10.430

 

#5 Luka Lesosky-Hay
Geelong Falcons | Midfielder | 164cm

A huge work ethic, Lesosky-Hay is a natural ball winner who can play inside or outside, and offers good tackling pressure to her side. She has averaged more than five tackles per game in the NAB League Girls this season.

NAB League Girls

SeasonTeamKHBDMCPUPTHOCLRI50R50GLGMKHDMHOTGDC Points
2019Geelong Falcons128671952200500025601012.86.719.52.20.05.00.064
Total-128671952200500025601012.86.719.52.20.05.00.064

Career Total

SeasonKHBDMCPUPTHOCLRI50R50GLGMKHDMHOTGDC Points
2019128671952200500025601012.86.719.52.20.05.00.064
Total128671952200500025601012.86.719.52.20.05.00.064

 

#6 Laura Gardiner*
Geelong Falcons | Balanced Midfielder | 164cm

Gardiner is a tackling machine who might not win the same numbers as some of her teammates, but plays an important role, usually off a wing, and is often key in getting the ball free and to teammates running down the ground. Averages almost six tackles per game.

NAB League Girls

SeasonTeamKHBDMCPUPTHOCLRI50R50GLGMKHDMHOTGDC Points
2019Geelong Falcons6467131100053001731106.46.713.11.00.05.30.140
Total-6467131100053001731106.46.713.11.00.05.30.140

Career Total

SeasonKHBDMCPUPTHOCLRI50R50GLGMKHDMHOTGDC Points
20196467131100053001731106.46.713.11.00.05.30.140
Total6467131100053001731106.46.713.11.00.05.30.140

 

#7 Ella Wood
GWV Rebels | Inside Midfielder | 164cm

An inside midfielder who cracks in at every opportunity, Wood missed the AFLW Under 18 Championships last year due to injury but has enjoyed good consistency this year, only missing the one game. Wood is able to play forward or back, and covers the ground well.

NAB League Girls

SeasonTeamKHBDMCPUPTHOCLRI50R50GLGMKHDMHOTGDC Points
2019GWV Rebels7632108200019001414189.54.013.52.50.02.40.150
Total-7632108200019001414189.54.013.52.50.02.40.150

Career Total

SeasonKHBDMCPUPTHOCLRI50R50GLGMKHDMHOTGDC Points
20197632108200019001414189.54.013.52.50.02.40.150
Total7632108200019001414189.54.013.52.50.02.40.150

 

#8 Elizabeth Snell*
Bendigo Pioneers | Small Forward | 165cm

Had a huge day out against Gippsland Power, booting five goals and looking lively in attack earlier in the season. She can play through the midfield, but has the goal sense and smarts inside 50 to play as that small forward who can dart into open space and cause headaches.

NAB League Girls

SeasonTeamKHBDMCPUPTHOCLRI50R50GLGMKHDMHOTGDC Points
2019Bendigo Pioneers741892230023001851089.32.311.52.90.02.91.354
Total-741892230023001851089.32.311.52.90.02.91.354

Career Total

SeasonKHBDMCPUPTHOCLRI50R50GLGMKHDMHOTGDC Points
2019741892230023001851089.32.311.52.90.02.91.354
Total741892230023001851089.32.311.52.90.02.91.354

 

#9 Darcy Moloney*
Geelong Falcons | Midfielder/Forward | 165cm

A medium midfielder forward who has a touch of class about the way she plays, and is always an option in transition. She can tend to be the player who spots up a target in a better position going down the ground, or centring the ball.

NAB League Girls

SeasonTeamKHBDMCPUPTHOCLRI50R50GLGMKHDMHOTGDC Points
2019Geelong Falcons8873161180036001974108.87.316.11.80.03.60.453
Total-8873161180036001974108.87.316.11.80.03.60.453

Career Total

SeasonKHBDMCPUPTHOCLRI50R50GLGMKHDMHOTGDC Points
20198873161180036001974108.87.316.11.80.03.60.453
Total8873161180036001974108.87.316.11.80.03.60.453

 

#10 Sophie Locke
Murray Bushrangers | General Defender | 166cm

Not a high possession winner, but a great lockdown defender who can push up the ground. Often tasked with taking on the opposition’s best general forward, and is good at nullifying opponents due to her high athletic capabilities. Loves a tackle and averages almost five per game.

NAB League Girls

SeasonTeamKHBDMCPUPTHOCLRI50R50GLGMKHDMHOTGDC Points
2019Murray Bushrangers66127814004210713097.31.38.71.60.14.70.032
Total-66127814004210713097.31.38.71.60.14.70.032

Career Total

SeasonKHBDMCPUPTHOCLRI50R50GLGMKHDMHOTGDC Points
201966127814004210713097.31.38.71.60.14.70.032
Total66127814004210713097.31.38.71.60.14.70.032

 

#11 Brooke Hards*
Bendigo Pioneers | Inside Midfielder | 166cm

The absolute definition of a tackling machine. Hards averaged 9.9 tackles per game this season, and was often tasked with going head-to-head against the opposition’s best midfielder, while trying to create attacking plays as well. Won Bendigo Pioneers’ Best and Fairest award for her consistency this season.

NAB League Girls

SeasonTeamKHBDMCPUPTHOCLRI50R50GLGMKHDMHOTGDC Points
2019Bendigo Pioneers6761128120089001620197.46.814.21.30.09.90.146
Total-6761128120089001620197.46.814.21.30.09.90.146

Career Total

SeasonKHBDMCPUPTHOCLRI50R50GLGMKHDMHOTGDC Points
20196761128120089001620197.46.814.21.30.09.90.146
Total6761128120089001620197.46.814.21.30.09.90.146

 

#12 Tyanna Smith*
Dandenong Stingrays | Midfielder | 167cm

Has an eye-catching burst of speed out of a stoppage and is a big-game player. A number of times she has stood up when her team needs her in crunch moments, and was one of Vic Country’s best at the AFL Women’s Under 16 Championships last year.

NAB League Girls

SeasonTeamKHBDMCPUPTHOCLRI50R50GLGMKHDMHOTGDC Points
2019Dandenong Stingrays7343116700250029117710.46.116.61.00.03.61.062
Total-7343116700250029117710.46.116.61.00.03.61.062

Career Total

SeasonKHBDMCPUPTHOCLRI50R50GLGMKHDMHOTGDC Points
20197343116700250029117710.46.116.61.00.03.61.062
Total7343116700250029117710.46.116.61.00.03.61.062

 

#13 Molly McDonald
Dandenong Stingrays | Midfielder | 168cm

Already on an AFLW list, McDonald has not let her imminent future phase her this season, putting in a consistent performance week-in, week-out for the Stingrays. Not always the highest disposal winner, McDonald’s one percenters would be as high as anyone in the league, and she creates opportunities for her teammates.

NAB League Girls

SeasonTeamKHBDMCPUPTHOCLRI50R50GLGMKHDMHOTGDC Points
2019Dandenong Stingrays702696110026102762710.03.713.71.60.13.70.353
Total-702696110026102762710.03.713.71.60.13.70.353

Career Total

SeasonKHBDMCPUPTHOCLRI50R50GLGMKHDMHOTGDC Points
2019702696110026102762710.03.713.71.60.13.70.353
Total702696110026102762710.03.713.71.60.13.70.353

 

#14 Abbey Chapman
Geelong Falcons | Key Defender | 170cm

One of the most consistent key defenders in the competition, Chapman will likely pair with Kate Douglass in the back 50. Being in the Geelong back 50 is often a blessing considering how strong the midfield is, but it has not stopped Chapman rebounding more than four times a game.

NAB League Girls

SeasonTeamKHBDMCPUPTHOCLRI50R50GLGMKHDMHOTGDC Points
2019Geelong Falcons852511019008104471108.52.511.01.90.10.80.142
Total-852511019008104471108.52.511.01.90.10.80.142

Career Total

SeasonKHBDMCPUPTHOCLRI50R50GLGMKHDMHOTGDC Points
2019852511019008104471108.52.511.01.90.10.80.142
Total852511019008104471108.52.511.01.90.10.80.142

 

#15 Nikia Webber
Gippsland Power | Key Forward | 170cm

The Gippsland Power key forward has an elite kick and with a strong midfield in front of her, Webber could be a real key in the side roaming up to half-forward. Last year she played well inside 50 with Lucy McEvoy, and now McEvoy could be kicking it to her inside 50.

NAB League Girls

SeasonTeamKHBDMCPUPTHOCLRI50R50GLGMKHDMHOTGDC Points
2019Gippsland Power682088100031101414588.52.511.01.30.13.90.643
Total-682088100031101414588.52.511.01.30.13.90.643

Career Total

SeasonKHBDMCPUPTHOCLRI50R50GLGMKHDMHOTGDC Points
2019682088100031101414588.52.511.01.30.13.90.643
Total682088100031101414588.52.511.01.30.13.90.643

 

#16 Renee Tierney*
Geelong Falcons | General Forward | 168cm

A consistent goalkicker who will likely play that third tall role in attack, Tierney became a premiership player in her bottom-age year last year, and has continued her form, pairing with Mia Skinner this year and averaging a goal a game. Has pushed more up the ground this year to averaged 15 disposals as well.

NAB League Girls

SeasonTeamKHBDMCPUPTHOCLRI50R50GLGMKHDMHOTGDC Points
2019Geelong Falcons8962151320047102019108.96.215.13.20.14.70.958
Total-8962151320047102019108.96.215.13.20.14.70.958

Career Total

SeasonKHBDMCPUPTHOCLRI50R50GLGMKHDMHOTGDC Points
20198962151320047102019108.96.215.13.20.14.70.958
Total8962151320047102019108.96.215.13.20.14.70.958

 

#17 Mia Skinner
Geelong Falcons | Key Forward | 170cm

The NAB League Girls leading goalkicker has been remarkable this season, booting 18 goals in nine games, and regularly kicking multiple goals in a game. She can turn a game with an impressive quarter, and has high footy IQ and goal sense inside 50. Can play tall or small.

NAB League Girls

SeasonTeamKHBDMCPUPTHOCLRI50R50GLGMKHDMHOTGDC Points
2019Geelong Falcons11425139180037180310191011.42.513.91.81.83.71.964
Total-11425139180037180310191011.42.513.91.81.83.71.964

Career Total

SeasonKHBDMCPUPTHOCLRI50R50GLGMKHDMHOTGDC Points
201911425139180037180310191011.42.513.91.81.83.71.964
Total11425139180037180310191011.42.513.91.81.83.71.964

 

#18 Kate Douglass
Bendigo Pioneers | Key Defender | 171cm

A consistent key defender who has had some stints in attack over the past 12 months, but is most notable for her ability to mark overhead, rebound and kick long. Can be a secure selection at full-back, rotating with Chapman and Zoe Hill.

NAB League Girls

SeasonTeamKHBDMCPUPTHOCLRI50R50GLGMKHDMHOTGDC Points
2019Bendigo Pioneers72148610001020138098.01.69.61.10.21.10.035
Total-72148610001020138098.01.69.61.10.21.10.035

Career Total

SeasonKHBDMCPUPTHOCLRI50R50GLGMKHDMHOTGDC Points
201972148610001020138098.01.69.61.10.21.10.035
Total72148610001020138098.01.69.61.10.21.10.035

 

#19 Brooke Vernon
Dandenong Stingrays | General Defender | 172cm

The prime rebounder in the NAB League Girls competition, Vernon has averaged more than five rebounds in the season so far and has been one of the most consistent players in the Stingrays’ line-up. Expect her to be tasked with the kick-outs at the championships.

NAB League Girls

SeasonTeamKHBDMCPUPTHOCLRI50R50GLGMKHDMHOTGDC Points
2019Dandenong Stingrays91281191900127012421811.43.514.92.40.91.50.158
Total-91281191900127012421811.43.514.92.40.91.50.158

Career Total

SeasonKHBDMCPUPTHOCLRI50R50GLGMKHDMHOTGDC Points
201991281191900127012421811.43.514.92.40.91.50.158
Total91281191900127012421811.43.514.92.40.91.50.158

 

#20 Zoe Hill*
Dandenong Stingrays | Key Defender | 173cm

The middle-age key defender is consistent to a tee, and is another option alongside the two top-age defenders in Chapman and Douglass back there. Another nullifying defender who will just lockdown on the opposition’s best forward. A long kick of the football.

NAB League Girls

SeasonTeamKHBDMCPUPTHOCLRI50R50GLGMKHDMHOTGDC Points
2019Dandenong Stingrays43216411002100117085.42.68.01.40.02.60.028
Total-43216411002100117085.42.68.01.40.02.60.028

Career Total

SeasonKHBDMCPUPTHOCLRI50R50GLGMKHDMHOTGDC Points
201943216411002100117085.42.68.01.40.02.60.028
Total43216411002100117085.42.68.01.40.02.60.028

 

#21 Sophie Molan
GWV Rebels | Midfielder/Forward | 175cm

A natural-born leader who has good size and can play anywhere, Molan will rotate between the midfield and forward. Averages more than 20 touches a game and lays almost five tackles. Will be a key leader in the side.

NAB League Girls

SeasonTeamKHBDMCPUPTHOCLRI50R50GLGMKHDMHOTGDC Points
2019GWV Rebels9966165900381027105812.48.320.61.10.14.80.669
Total-9966165900381027105812.48.320.61.10.14.80.669

Career Total

SeasonKHBDMCPUPTHOCLRI50R50GLGMKHDMHOTGDC Points
20199966165900381027105812.48.320.61.10.14.80.669
Total9966165900381027105812.48.320.61.10.14.80.669

 

#22 Millie Brown
Murray Bushrangers | Defender/Midfielder | 175cm

Has found a great niche in defence and can play tall or small due to her strength overhead and ability to create plays from down the field. Will be a key player at the National Championships.

NAB League Girls

SeasonTeamKHBDMCPUPTHOCLRI50R50GLGMKHDMHOTGDC Points
2019Murray Bushrangers94551491200150015280713.47.921.31.70.02.10.069
Total-94551491200150015280713.47.921.31.70.02.10.069

Career Total

SeasonKHBDMCPUPTHOCLRI50R50GLGMKHDMHOTGDC Points
201994551491200150015280713.47.921.31.70.02.10.069
Total94551491200150015280713.47.921.31.70.02.10.069

 

#23 Lucy McEvoy
Geelong Falcons | Tall Utility | 172cm

The Falcons captain has been a highly-touted prospect for some time and looms as Vic Country’s top prospect this year with her pure consistency, ball-winning ability and versatility to play anywhere on the ground. She was a star at last year’s AFL Women’s Under 18 Championships, playing in attack and having a couple of bags of goals to her name.

NAB League Girls

SeasonTeamKHBDMCPUPTHOCLRI50R50GLGMKHDMHOTGDC Points
2019Geelong Falcons123711943400629034192913.77.921.63.81.06.90.280
Total-123711943400629034192913.77.921.63.81.06.90.280

Career Total

SeasonKHBDMCPUPTHOCLRI50R50GLGMKHDMHOTGDC Points
2019123711943400629034192913.77.921.63.81.06.90.280
Total123711943400629034192913.77.921.63.81.06.90.280

 

#24 Isabella Simmons*
GWV Rebels | Key Forward/Midfielder | 181cm

A raw talent who is tall enough to play key forward, but athletic enough to roam up to a wing and through the midfield. Still a middle-age player, but would provide height in the forward half.

NAB League Girls

SeasonTeamKHBDMCPUPTHOCLRI50R50GLGMKHDMHOTGDC Points
2019GWV Rebels45105514001100107276.41.47.92.00.01.60.334
Total-45105514001100107276.41.47.92.00.01.60.334

Career Total

SeasonKHBDMCPUPTHOCLRI50R50GLGMKHDMHOTGDC Points
201945105514001100107276.41.47.92.00.01.60.334
Total45105514001100107276.41.47.92.00.01.60.334

 

#25 Olivia Barber*
Murray Bushrangers | Key Utility | 184cm

Barber has played everywhere in her short career, and coming from a basketball background she has some natural abilities such as her leap. Her leading patterns and marking is also strong, and she can chop out Maggie Caris in the ruck when required.

NAB League Girls

SeasonTeamKHBDMCPUPTHOCLRI50R50GLGMKHDMHOTGDC Points
2019Murray Bushrangers46176322001012063767.72.810.53.72.01.71.251
Total-46176322001012063767.72.810.53.72.01.71.251

Career Total

SeasonKHBDMCPUPTHOCLRI50R50GLGMKHDMHOTGDC Points
201946176322001012063767.72.810.53.72.01.71.251
Total46176322001012063767.72.810.53.72.01.71.251

 

#26 Isabella Shannon
Dandenong Stingrays | Midfielder/Forward | 178cm

Another pre-listed AFLW player, Shannon is a tall forward who can play through the midfield. She is a prolific tackler and creates a point of difference at half-forward, always creating a contest and bringing the ball down for her teammates.

NAB League Girls

SeasonTeamKHBDMCPUPTHOCLRI50R50GLGMKHDMHOTGDC Points
2019Dandenong Stingrays7634110140031002685710.94.915.72.00.04.40.761
Total-7634110140031002685710.94.915.72.00.04.40.761

Career Total

SeasonKHBDMCPUPTHOCLRI50R50GLGMKHDMHOTGDC Points
20197634110140031002685710.94.915.72.00.04.40.761
Total7634110140031002685710.94.915.72.00.04.40.761

 

#27 Shanara Notman
Gippsland Power | Key Defender | 178cm

A raw talent in defence, Notman had a big game in the final round and provides another option as a key defender in the Country side. Notman is good overhead and can rebound the ball outside 50, willing to take the game on.

NAB League Girls

SeasonTeamKHBDMCPUPTHOCLRI50R50GLGMKHDMHOTGDC Points
2019Gippsland Power271239900520015046.83.09.82.30.51.30.037
Total-271239900520015046.83.09.82.30.51.30.037

Career Total

SeasonKHBDMCPUPTHOCLRI50R50GLGMKHDMHOTGDC Points
2019271239900520015046.83.09.82.30.51.30.037
Total271239900520015046.83.09.82.30.51.30.037

 

#28 Georgia Howes
Dandenong Stingrays | Ruck/Key Forward | 183cm

Each side is only allowed one overage player in the squad and after Rene Caris was that player last year, it is Georgia Howes this year. She provides a stronger body at the ruck stoppages and can rest forward as well. Does not mind a tackle too.

NAB League Girls

SeasonTeamKHBDMCPUPTHOCLRI50R50GLGMKHDMHOTGDC Points
2019Dandenong Stingrays412566140030118095594.62.87.31.613.13.30.643
Total-412566140030118095594.62.87.31.613.13.30.643

Career Total

SeasonKHBDMCPUPTHOCLRI50R50GLGMKHDMHOTGDC Points
2019412566140030118095594.62.87.31.613.13.30.643
Total412566140030118095594.62.87.31.613.13.30.643

 

#29 Maggie Caris*
GWV Rebels | Ruck | 188cm

The standout ruck throughout the NAB League Girls competition, Caris is the tallest Victorian player selected and also has represented her state at netball. She is clean below her knees and nearly always gets first hands to it in a ruck contest.

NAB League Girls

SeasonTeamKHBDMCPUPTHOCLRI50R50GLGMKHDMHOTGDC Points
2019GWV Rebels29235230010140036064.83.88.70.523.31.70.049
Total-29235230010140036064.83.88.70.523.31.70.049

Career Total

SeasonKHBDMCPUPTHOCLRI50R50GLGMKHDMHOTGDC Points
201929235230010140036064.83.88.70.523.31.70.049
Total29235230010140036064.83.88.70.523.31.70.049

Victorian AFL Women’s Under 18 Championship teams announced

REIGNING premiers, Geelong Falcons have dominated the Victorian representation with nine players in the Vic Country 29-player squad, while minor premiers Northern Knights, finalists Eastern Ranges and fifth placed Oakleigh Chargers have six apiece in the 30-player Vic Metro squad. Of the other sides, Dandenong Stingrays also has six players in the Country team, meaning more than half the squad are Falcons or Stingrays, including St Kilda pre-listed duo, Molly McDonald and Isabella Shannon. Greater Western Victoria (GWV) Rebels and Sandringham Dragons have five players each in the Country and Metro squads respectively, while Murray Bushrangers and Western Jets have four apiece. Bendigo Pioneers and Calder Cannons have three players in their representative squad, while Gippsland Power has the two.

Vic Country has included eight middle-agers (not eligible to be drafted until next year) in its squad, while Vic Metro has seven. The two coaches will have more than their fair share of AFL and AFLW experience, with Nathan Burke taking the reigns at Vic Metro, while Aasta O’Connor will coach Vic Country. The sides face off on June 22, before squads are reduced to fly to Gold Coast for three games against other states from July 8-12. AFL Draft Central will be on the ground in Queensland providing you all the latest.

State Talent Manager Paul Hamilton said the Championships gave Victoria’s best emerging female footballers the chance to highlight their skills on a big stage.

“The NAB AFL Women’s Under-18 Championships have the potential to put our up-and-coming female players firmly on the radar of AFL Women’s clubs,” Hamilton said. “Our Vic Country and Vic Metro girls will have access to some of the best coaching resources in women’s football in order to develop their games and will be able to experience playing at elite-level venues against the best talent the rest of Australia has to offer. “Travelling to the Gold Coast in July will also provide them an extra opportunity to bond with girls who share a common goal of furthering their careers within the elite talent pathway.”

The Country vs Metro under-18 match on June 22 will be part of a double-header along with an under-16 Country vs Metro clash (commencing at 12pm), with the initial squads for those teams to be announced next week. All the non-Victorian state lists will be posted once the final team lists are completed, with some out, while others are yet to be released.

Tomorrow we will provide more details on each of those players selected in the Victorian squads.

VIC COUNTRY

NO. NAME   DOB HT NAB LEAGUE GIRLS CLUB
1 Elise Vella 05-Sep-01 156 Geelong Falcons
2 Teagan Brett 08-Feb-01 157 Murray Bushrangers
3 Paige Sheppard 23-Apr-01 158 Geelong Falcons
4 Renee Saulitis 14-Aug-02 163 GWV Rebels
5 Luka Lesosky-Hay 07-Jan-01 164 Geelong Falcons
6 Laura Gardiner 21-Nov-02 164 Geelong Falcons
7 Ella Wood 14-Feb-01 164 GWV Rebels
8 Elizabeth Snell 14-Mar-02 165 Bendigo Pioneers
9 Darcy Moloney 20-Nov-02 165 Geelong Falcons
10 Sophie Locke 24-Apr-01 166 Murray Bushrangers
11 Brooke Hards 19-Jul-02 166 Bendigo Pioneers
12 Tyanna Smith 29-Oct-02 167 Dandenong Stingrays
13 Molly McDonald 04-May-01 168 Dandenong Stingrays
14 Abbey Chapman 15-Apr-01 170 Geelong Falcons
15 Nikia Webber 29-Aug-01 170 Gippsland Power
16 Renee Tierney 23-May-02 168 Geelong Falcons
17 Mia Skinner 30-Jan-01 170 Geelong Falcons
18 Kate Douglass 19-Jul-01 171 Bendigo Pioneers
19 Brooke Vernon 20-Oct-01 172 Dandenong Stingrays
20 Zoe Hill 13-May-02 173 Dandenong Stingrays
21 Sophie Molan 24-Mar-01 175 GWV Rebels
22 Millie Brown 15-Jan-01 175 Murray Bushrangers
23 Lucy McEvoy 13-May-01 172 Geelong Falcons
24 Isabella Simmons 19-Apr-02 181 GWV Rebels
25 Olivia Barber 14-Jul-02 184 Murray Bushrangers
26 Isabella Shannon 30-Jun-01 178 Dandenong Stingrays
27 Shanara Notman 27-Jul-01 178 Gippsland Power
28 Georgia Howes 26-Jul-00 183 Dandenong Stingrays
29 Maggie Caris 21-Dec-02 188 GWV Rebels

 

VIC METRO

NO. NAME   DOB HT NAB LEAGUE GIRLS CLUB
1 Olivia Meagher 10-Dec-02 158 Eastern Ranges
2 Felicity Theodore 14-Mar-01 159 Calder Cannons
3 Gemma Lagioia 03-May-01 160 Oakleigh Chargers
4 Nicola Xenos 08-Mar-01 161 Oakleigh Chargers
5 Elisabeth Georgostathis 17-Oct-01 162 Western Jets
6 Madeleine Edwards 19-Jan-01 164 Eastern Ranges
7 Amelia Van Oosterwijck 08-Nov-01 164 Oakleigh Chargers
8 Mimi Hill 04-Oct-01 165 Oakleigh Chargers
9 Bella Eddey 02-Nov-02 165 Sandringham Dragons
10 Alana Barba 26-Sep-01 166 Calder Cannons
11 Tarni Brown 26-Mar-02 166 Eastern Ranges
12 Alice Burke 10-Mar-02 166 Sandringham Dragons
13 Britney Gutknecht 20-Apr-01 167 Northern Knights
14 Laura McClelland 03-Jul-01 169 Eastern Ranges
15 Alyssa Bannan 13-Apr-02 169 Northern Knights
16 Emily Harley 04-Dec-01 169 Oakleigh Chargers
17 Georgia Patrikios 30-Mar-01 170 Calder Cannons
18 Emma Horne 29-Nov-01 170 Eastern Ranges
19 Marguerite Purcell 27-Jul-01 170 Sandringham Dragons
20 Sarah Sansonetti 02-Aug-01 172 Northern Knights
21 Ellie McKenzie 17-Oct-02 173 Northern Knights
22 Sarah Hartwig 04-Dec-02 173 Sandringham Dragons
23 Nell Morris-Dalton 05-Apr-01 174 Northern Knights
24 Isabella Grant 21-Sep-01 174 Western Jets
25 Tahlia Merrett 08-Jan-01 174 Eastern Ranges
26 Gabrielle Newton 31-Aug-01 175 Northern Knights
27 Molly Denahy Maloney 25-Feb-01 175 Sandringham Dragons
28 Isabelle Pritchard 08-Mar-02 176 Western Jets
29 Cleo Saxon-Jones 04-Nov-01 181 Western Jets
30 Amelia Peck 13-Jan-00 183 Oakleigh Chargers

Scouting notes: Victorian trials

VICTORIA’S top talents in the 2019 and 2020 draft crops took to Ikon Park yesterday with two trial games in front of Victorian selectors and AFL club recruiters in a bid to impress for selection ahead of the National Under 18 Championships. We took a look at 15 of the top performers from both sides across the two games.

 

VIC COUNTRY:

By: Ed Pascoe

Lachlan Ash (Murray Bushrangers)

Ash was a strong performer down back, he rarely missed a target all day and his run and carry throughout the game was a huge factor in the Country team getting the win. Ash showed his dash with some huge runs down the wing, often taking the game on and his constant sideways movement and composure made him a nightmare to tackle for the opposition. Ash often took the kick outs and was extremely organised and often picked the right option and worked hard to again link up.

Ned Cahill (Dandenong Stingrays)

Cahill started the game through the midfield – winning the ball on the inside and outside. He had a nice bit of play in the first quarter winning a contested ball on the wing and then a good handball to is teammate. Cahill would go forward on a few occasions, kicking a nice running goal in the second quarter and a nice pass inside 50 to teammate Josh Smith in the third quarter, he would crumb a contest in the last quarter and showed his dash away from the contests and delivered the ball well by hand.

Sam De Koning (Dandenong Stingrays)

De Koning looked lively early down back, taking the ball at every opportunity and showing some real class with his pickups at ground level – exceptional for a 200cm player. His rebound work was solid and whenever he was around the ball he did some nice things and looked to play with good intent.

Kyle Dunkley (Gippsland Power)

Dunkley looked best inside the contest using his quick and clean hands at stoppages to release to his running teammates and he did well doing the bulk of the contested work through the midfield. It was not a prolific day stats wise for Dunkley but he would add a nice goal to his name with a long bomb from 50 meters.

Sam Flanders (Gippsland Power)

Flanders was busy through the midfield winning clearances and pumping the ball inside 50. Flanders usually has a big impact up forward so it was good to see him getting some midfield time where he contributed well. He had a nice bit of play in the third quarter, taking a mark inside 50 and quickly kicking to the advantage to teammate Sam Conforti which lead to a goal.

Elijah Hollands (Murray Bushrangers)

Hollands was seriously impressive up forward, he was a constant threat and was often minded by one of 2019’s top prospects Dylan Williams. He kicked his first goal in the first quarter running into open goal and he set up others with his kicking inside 50 all class. One of his standout features was his ability to keep strong in the contest and get his arms up, and his second goal came from a classy snap goal 40 metres out in the third quarter. His best bit of play also came in the third quarter where he worked hard to keep the ball in play on a wing and used the ball well with a long handball to a running teammate inboard.

Mitch Martin (GWV Rebels)

Martin did some really nice things through the midfield, he won some great clearances and showed plenty of class with ball in hand with his best movement coming in the first quarter with a bullet pass inside 50 to teammate Fraser Phillips. Martin was good at stoppages and won some nice clearances.

Fraser Phillips (Gippsland Power)

Phillips looked lively early with a nice lead up mark but missing the set shot, he would look bests setting up others with his laser left foot with some impressive kicks inside 50 in the third quarter with one to the smallest player for Country in Jye Chalcraft and tallest, Aaron Gundry.

Jay Rantall (GWV Rebels)

Rantall has had a fantastic start to the year and that trend continued with an impressive showing for Country through the midfield. Rantall’s clean hands and quick handballs at stoppages were a highlight and he was a consistent performer winning plenty of the ball over the four quarters. Rantall added a goal after a 50 metre penalty, he would quickly play on and kick the running goal.

Mitchell Riordan (Dandenong Stingrays)

Riordan was one of Country’s more impactful midfielders showing his class and composure around the ball and working hard to move the ball on and attack at any opportunity. He had a lovely kick inside 50 in the first quarter and showed some dash in the third quarter with a great run through the middle of the ground and kicking long inside 50.

Caleb Serong (Gippsland Power)

Serong was a really strong player through the midfield and Country’s obvious standout in the second game. His work through the midfield was first class with his clean and hard attack on the ball and his movement to avoid tacklers to get a handball out. Serong would kick a terrific long goal from 50 meters which showed his class and why he is considered one of Country’s better prospects for the 2019 season.

Brock Smith (Gippsland Power)

Smith was solid down back doing well in one on ones and working hard to rebound ad move the ball forward. Smith played his role well down back doing everything required and showing strong leadership showing why he was named the Gippsland captain.

Cody Weightman (Dandenong Stingrays)

Weightman did not get a lot of the ball but he always looked dangerous both in the air and at ground level constantly throwing himself up for marks and making defenders panic at ground level with his run and excitement, Weightman had his best quarter in the last with some very nice things around the ball.

Cameron Wild (Murray Bushrangers)

Wild was a solid player through the midfield, working hard inside and outside the contests to stay involved over the four quarters. He kicked a goal from a set shot after winning a free kick in the first quarter, and Wild showed his toughness with a hard tackle winning a free kick in the third quarter and then kicking wide with lovely delivery to his teammates advantage.

Hayden Young (Dandenong Stingrays)

Young started slow down back but really lifted in the second quarter with some great work under pressure and some good link-up play. He would work really hard for the rest of the game doing his best to win every contest he was near and run off to be an option and use his lethal left boot. Young was often used for kick outs where he was effective at hitting short and long passes with ease.

 

VIC METRO:

By: Peter Williams

Noah Anderson (Oakleigh Chargers)

Finished the game a bit sore after a ripping first half where he showed good hands under pressure, in one instance giving it off to Carafa in the third term to give him time and space. Kicked a goal in the same quarter after running into the hole and taking a mark uncontested then converting the set shot. Showed off his nice penetrating kick at times.

Trent Bianco (Oakleigh Chargers)

The classy ball magnet was deployed off half-back and just used the ball so well. He was busy early and able to hit up targets with ease on his left. He showed great composure in traffic and got to the outside and had an impact.

Louis Butler (Sandringham Dragons)

After a fumble or two early, Butler came into his own as the game went on, looking very impressive off half-back – running off his opponent to get forward and creative scoring opportunities for teammates. He had a terrific kick out in front of a leading Billy McCormack who capitalised with a goal, and had the ball on a string throughout the second half. An impressive performance.

Ryan Byrnes (Sandringham Dragons)

Was played on the outside most of the game, often playing off a wing. He used quick hands and showed nice speed out of a stoppage using his opposite foot to find a target inside 50.

Adam Carafa (Northern Knights)

Was hit and miss by foot at times, but performed throughout the four quarters, setting up a few players inside 50 including neat kicks to Curtis Brown and Josh May in the second half. Just kept battling and giving his all throughout the game.

Charlie Dean (Sandringham Dragons)

The Sandringham Dragons forward shines as the clear standout key position forward from the Victorian perspective, with his leading patterns and work rate impressive. He pushes up the ground and finds the ball, and can double back and make second leads where required. He did have a set shot to forget missing the lot early, but capped it off with some goals including the easiest of attempts alone in the goal square and another from long range which bounced through.

Cody Hirst (Eastern Ranges)

The half-forward had a number of strong chances, going in hard and providing plenty of defensive pressure, booting a goal for his efforts after protecting the ball drop inside 50 then putting it straight through the middle. One of the more memorable moments was spoiling a kick and nullifying a contest against three opponents.

Emerson Jeka (Western Jets)

After a quiet start to the game, Jeka came into his own in the final term, booting three goals and hitting the post to almost single-handedly take the game away from Country. He showed good aggression going for his marks and took a couple of great contested grabs. Jeka showed a good presence and while he did go to ground a number of times, when marking took the ball at the highest point.

Harrison Jones (Calder Cannons)

Not a huge possession winner but took a number of good marks playing at half-back. Spread to dangerous positions and took a great intercept mark at centre-half back in the second half.

Jack Mahony (Sandringham Dragons)

The big disposal winner played a multitude of roles across the ground, winning the ball on the wing, in defence and even getting forward to kick a goal and set up another. He has neat skills and particularly stepped up in the second half, pushing hard along the wing to win a chain of possessions from the back pocket to forward pocket. Just keeps running all day.

Mitch Mellis (Eastern Ranges)

The energetic small was clean at ground level and moved well throughout the game. Mellis showed good composure and good vision and was able to use his hands on the inside with quick hands. Was solid throughout.

Daniel Mott (Calder Cannons)

A big game from the Calder Cannons midfielder who was second to Matt Rowell across the four quarters. He and Rowell combined well through the middle and he was able to capitalise on the outside using his slick skills to get the ball forward. He won his fair share of his own footy as well and was able to use quick hands to keep the ball moving. Mott also had a number of scoring assists and kicked a terrific goal in the final term off a step.

Brodie Newman (Calder Cannons)

Got better as the game went on and was strong in the back 50 showing composure coming off half-back and using his penetrating kick to clear defence. Was often mopping up throughout the back half and getting it cleanly to teammates. Peeled off when needed but was accountable at the same time.

Matthew Rowell (Oakleigh Chargers)

Going from strength to strength is the star midfielder. Hardly puts a foot wrong and is just a complete all-round player not dissimilar to Sam Walsh last year. Rowell took a number of strong marks around the ground, won plenty of the football and clearances, then capped off a stunning performance with a couple of goals. Kicked his first with a perfect kick on his left straight through the middle, then did it again later in the game where he seemingly cruised out of a stoppage and just put it straight through. No doubt suffered leather poisoning in a best on ground performance.

Lachlan Stapleton (Eastern Ranges)

Kicked a couple of goals throughout and had a crack, a quick snap through in the first half got him on the board then snuck inside 50, took an uncontested mark and kicked a good goal.

Opportunity becomes a reality for Webster

REBECCA Webster first joined TAC Cup Girls side, the Murray Bushrangers as a 14 year-old.

At that point in time, Webster admits the opportunity to play in a nationwide female Australian Rules competition was looking unlikely. But four years later, the 18 year-old is living out her dream; drafted by Geelong at pick seven.

“I’m really lost for words,” Webster said. “I never thought the day would come that we’d be sitting in there, so to get my name read out with the Geelong Cats was something I’ll remember forever and cherish.”

The occasion was even more special for Webster, as she had turned 18 the day before she got drafted, prompting a perfect birthday present. Before draft day though, Webster had contact with the Cats and says they were very engaging when trying to get her to the club.

“They were really good people and I know quite a lot of girls from Geelong,” Webster said. “They were very inviting. “They just wanted regional girls that were going to produce some great use coming through and I think that they’ve really done that with the picks they’ve picked.”

Webster joins the club alongside fellow Vic Country representatives such as Nina Morrison, Sophie Van De Heuvel and Georgia Clarke. She knows all these players well and looks forward to continuing her football journey with them.

“All the girls that are going to be playing down at Geelong, they’re really good girls and they know how to play footy,” Webster said. “We’ve got a really good bond so I think playing alongside them will be really good.”

Representing Vic Country over the years has been a valuable experience for Webster, who has modelled her game off one particular teammate who is now on an AFL Women’s list.

“I think I’m quite an individual but I’d love to think that I play kind of like Darcy Guttridge, she’s quite an attacking half-back player,” she said.

Like many up and coming players do, Webster also has some football idols. While Webster’s admired female footballer is a common admired name, she looks up to one of the more interesting characters of the men’s game.

“Probably Daisy Pearce (is my football idol),” the 18 year-old said. “From the males, (I like) Jason Akermanis. “When I was younger, I just thought he was cool.”

Webster spent some time this year with Melbourne University. While it was a big step-up, she says it was a valuable experience.

“The step was more so body size to get used to but other than that, I really enjoyed it and thought I fitted in pretty well,” Webster said.

The midfielder/ defender had to balance this along with playing in other teams, going to school and working. This can be a stressful prospect for anyone, but Webster admits she learnt how to juggle these commitments through football.

“With Year 12 and studies and all that sort of stuff alongside footy and work commitments, it’s obviously a very big juggle,” she said. “But with the footy side of things, I’ve learnt a lot of time management so that’s really helped this year.”

Now looking ahead to 2019, Webster hopes to use these lessons at her new AFL Women’s club. She also hopes to utilise her strengths in her game to make the most of her time at the Cats.

“I’m quite happy playing half-back flank down there,” Webster said. “But playing in different positions is something that I look forward to trying out and definitely with senior footy, you can be chucked anywhere.”

Collingwood draftee, Jordyn Allen “couldn’t think of a better club to be at”

JORDYN Allen had been in contact with a couple of clubs heading into the AFL Women’s Draft.

But she had no idea which club would pick her up. The Pies ended up selecting Allen at pick five, and the 18 year-old is overwhelmed about her opportunity to pull on the black and white.

“I kind of just burst into tears when my name got called out,” Allen said. “I didn’t expect to have that sort of reaction but I honestly couldn’t think of a better club to be at and absolutely stoked to be in the black and white.”

Allen plays a similar role to Collingwood’s reigning Best and Fairest winner, Chloe Molloy. Both are attacking half-backs, but offer versatility through the midfield as well. The Dandenong Stingrays captain hopes she can make a similar impact to Molloy.

“I offer the half-back, a bit of attacking so I look up to Chloe in terms of her versatility,” Allen said. “So just like she got put forward and through the midfield, I hope that I can perform the same role for Collingwood.”

Allen led the Stingrays this year in the TAC Cup Girls competition and was named in the best in seven out of the eight games she played. She says Dandenong has played a huge part in helping her get to where she is today.

“The Stingrays have given me so much support,” Allen said. “It’s been phenomenal. “It’s sad to leave them I guess but I’ll always be connected to the Stingrays and always be a Stingray girl at heart.”

Being the club captain enabled Allen to add a new element to her game. She developed her leadership skills remarkably and was rewarded with a chance to captain Vic Country this year. Now, she has the opportunity to one day be a leader at the Pies.

“Being a leader’s definitely another aspect of my game that you have to kind of bring beyond your footy skills and it’s been awesome, you get to know people really well,” Allen said. “You get to see a different side of people that you don’t get to really see and create those bonds you don’t usually get to make so it’s been awesome and the footy’s been amazing this year. “We’ve had some really awesome opportunities and couldn’t be more thankful for all of the people who got me here.”

At Collingwood, Allen has the opportunity to play alongside former Vic Country representative, Darcy Guttridge. The 18 year-old is looking forward to playing alongside one of her favourite teammates at an elite level.

“I played a fair bit of junior football with her and watched her get drafted last year,” Allen said. “She didn’t play due to injury but played a bit of VFL (Victorian Football League) with her this year and she’s probably one of the best teammates I could have. “She’s definitely someone I look up to and I can’t wait to play with her again.”

As a junior, Allen knew that she was always going to do whatever her brother did. So when he picked up a football, so too did Allen. Now, she will be picking up a football in the highest level of female football in Australia, in what is truly a dream come true for the talented leader.

Football culture wins over Denby Taylor

DESCRIBED as “Dad’s only son”, Denby Taylor has forged her own sporting pathway after growing up balancing both football and netball. Taylor said he father was a “footy nut” and could not be prouder that the Geelong Falcons star had followed football.

“I’d probably say my dad has been the biggest influence,” she said. “I suppose getting four daughters, given he’s a footy nut, wasn’t the best thing I suppose, for him, I think now he’s pretty happy and proud of where I’ve come. “I finished netball last year so I was playing that for about maybe nine years or so. “I followed my sister’s footsteps in the netball path, and sort of made my own pathway in the football. ‘Dad’s only son’ I get called.”

Taylor said she loved the fact that football just focused on the sport itself, and enjoyed the physical nature of the contest compared to other codes she had tried.

“The difference in the games obviously so much more physical and there’s the culture as well,” she said. “I think netball and a lot of other sports can get a little bit political, but footy just focuses on the footy and I really like that. “Footy for me is probably the culture that keeps me coming back, I really like how much of the culture and the tight knit community that the club provides. I suppose the physicality of the game as well, it’s quite different to most other games, it’s quite enjoyable.”

Taylor was kicking a football around from a young age, but then gave up the sport to pursue netball, before returning once Youth Girls had begun to rise in popularity.

“I started with Auskick, dad brought me down to the local club and started playing there and then after a couple of years I wasn’t very keen on playing with the boys so I gave up the footy and then started again when I was about 13 with the youth girls,” Taylor said. “Then I continued playing Youth Girls up until last year, and then representative footy as well along the way. “(I) did Geelong Falcons for the past couple of years and the national carnivals for a couple of years as well. “Between that I was playing netball as well for Newtown and Chilwell.”

While Taylor had been known best as a rebounding defender this season, her stints up forward were actually a throwback to where she had played the last few seasons.

“I’ve only recently started playing back and I’ve been loving it so, it’s a really great experience to switch up roles, but I suppose I’m comfortable down forward, it’s where I played a lot of my footy,” Taylor said. “It’s quite a big transition but I’m really happy being down back now.”

Upon reflection, Taylor said she and the rest of her Geelong Falcons teammates had enjoyed the 2018 premiership following a perfect, undefeated season, but now her focus was purely on the draft. In particular, the versatile utility said she was working hard to build her fitness ahead of the AFL Women’s Draft Combine next month. She knows the competition has intensified at both TAC Cup Girls and AFL Women’s Under 18 Championships.

“I think some of my family comes and watches the games,” Taylor said of the TAC Cup Girls. “They say every year it lifts so much, the quality and the community and how everyone’s getting around it is just getting a lot better. “It (the AFL Women’s Championships) was in Queensland again. “I had family up there who hadn’t seen football for a whole year between the last championships and they pretty much just said ‘wow, that’s unbelievable how much it’s changed and how much it’s changed since last year’ so I think that really put it into perspective, because i get to see it every day I suppose.”

Outside of her football, Taylor enjoys spending the majority of her time outdoors getting plenty of fresh air.

“I do woodwork as a subject at school, that’s something I really enjoy doing outside of school as well,” Taylor said. “That and I’m also into bike riding and skating so yeah, pretty much all the outdoorsy sort of things. “Next year I’m going to take a gap year and just work and sort out what I might want to do and I think sort of what’s on the plate at teh moment, is a teaching degree. maybe teaching sport or something along those lines, something I’m comfortable with.”

But the most immediate goal for Taylor is clear – get drafted onto an AFL Women’s list.

“I think for me footy was more of a social thing for a long thing and then once I started playing rep footy and started getting a bit better, I was like ‘oh this could be fun’,” Taylor said. “I might keep going, and once I got put in the National Academy I thought ‘alright I might as well give it a go’. “I’ve got the opportunity, I didn’t want to let it go.”

Webber rises to success against the odds

AS a youngster who loved to watch her brother play football, Nikia Webber asked her dad if she could do the same.

He was against the idea because he perceived football as a masculine sport at the time. But after persistence from a young Webber, she got the opportunity to kick a footy around in a local team.

“Dad wouldn’t let me play because I was a girl,” she said. “Then I sort of just kept asking and asking and he sort of just gave in so then I played my first game in under 12s and then from there on, I just loved the game.”

Webber concedes that her father was not happy with the idea of his little princess playing football, but came around to it eventually.

“Because I’m his little princess, obviously he was pretty upset when I said I wanted to play footy, it wasn’t a girls sport at the time,” she said. “But now that he’s seen how far I’ve gone, he sort of agrees with what I’m doing now so that’s probably a positive out of that one.”

Her Dad also now takes time out of his weekend, along with her Mum, to take her wherever she needs to be, helping her to achieve her dream of playing AFL Women’s. Webber said that representing Vic Country at this year’s AFL Women’s Under 18 Championships made her want to seriously chase this dream and make it a reality.

“That experience made me want to pursue my dream and play AFLW,” the 17 year-old said. “It was a really good confidence-builder.”

She also admits that the experience was surreal, as she got to play with and against some of the most talented female footballers in the country.

“It was overwhelming up there” the Gippsland forward said. “It didn’t feel real until I was actually up there playing in those colours against all the other teams. “It was a really good experience because I’m such a young age so it was really good.”

Despite being a young age, Webber found herself stepping up as a leader in the Gippsland Power side. Although it was a big step-up, she benefited from being able to pass on her knowledge to the young, up-and-coming players.

“This year was a big step-up,” she said. “Obviously I was one of the older ones so all the new girls that we had come into the program, I sort of got to show them around, (show them) what I did and where I started from. “It gave them an opportunity and gave them an open mindset to be who I am.”

She realised she had leadership capabilities thanks to a stellar year in the forward line where she kicked 12 goals in eight games.

“In previous years, I was sort of quiet and now this year, I sort of realised that I can be one of those players who stands up and obviously kick a few goals and be a team leader, even though I wasn’t in the leadership group,” the 17 year-old said.

Webber has certainly come a long way since her first year in the Power program as a 14 year-old. She admits that it was pretty daunting to start playing for an elite side, but is thankful that she had an older player, who was her mentor, to show her the ropes.

“In that environment with the older girls, I didn’t know what to do or what I was in for,” the Vic Country representative said. “It was pretty weird. “I had a mentor so one of the older girls took me under their wing and sort of showed me around, what to do, what not to do. “It was really good. “If I didn’t have the mentor, I would be lost. “I was so nervous going in through those doors, seeing all those high-skilled girls and they were all older than me, so yeah I was pretty nervous.”

Before receiving this opportunity, Webber was a dedicated basketballer, venturing off to the sport after her Dad said she couldn’t take up football. She says her training was intense, and after getting sick of the high-pressure environment, she decided to pursue a career in football instead.

“I was training for that (basketball) non-stop,” Webber said. “I had a personal trainer, I went into all the basketball camps and then decided that I didn’t want to play basketball anymore so that’s when I took on footy.”

She has not looked back since then, and has had a breakout year in 2018. After being the Power’s leading goal kicker during the TAC Cup Girls season, she went on to represent Vic Country up on the Gold Coast to cap off a wonderful football season. 

Scouting notes: U17s – Vic Country vs Queensland

IN the first game at Ikon Park yesterday, Vic Country defeated Queensland in an exciting contest. We review all the players from both teams.

Vic Country:

By: Peter Williams and Craig Byrnes

#1 Kobe Brown

Had an early shot on goal on the run, but had an unlucky bounce and it went to the wrong side and out of bounds. A highlight-worthy moment came later in the game when he cleanly picked up the ball off the deck and side-stepped an opponent on the forward 50 arc. Fantastic agility.

#2 Jye Chalcraft

One of the more impressive Country players, Chalcraft showed fantastic strength and composure inside the forward 50 arc. We already knew he had top-class agility, but he went out with a real desire to hunt the football and the ball carrier in a contested brand of football. Spent a little bit of time through midfield, but majority inside 50, booting a goal in the final term to ice the game for Country. Laid some fantastic tackles and almost had a goal early in the game but just missed on the run.

#4 Jarryd Barker

Had one of the best clearances out of the middle early on, managing to burst away and hit-up a teammate lace-out in the first term by lowering the eyes. From then on it was a workman-like performance, laying some big tackles and he did well by hand or foot, lowering the eyes going inside 50. He had a shot on goal in the final term, but missed to the right. He still accumulated the footy, but a lot of it was in the contest, and often feeding it out to teammates, playing an important role at the stoppages.

#5 Flynn Perez

An exciting talent who oozes X-factor. His consistency throughout games still needs to improve, but when he has the ball he can do some magical things with it. He lowers his eyes going inside 50 and hit-up Fraser Phillips coming through the midfield when he was coming off half-back. Clean hands at ground level and his closing speed is top-notch. He was used in transition going forward, and was rewarded for hard running by playing deeper, marking 35m out and converting the set shot.

#6 Riley Baldi

An absolutely huge first half, having the ball on a string and seemingly covering the ground with ease. He was strong at the packs, winning clearances, cracking in hard at the contested ball and just extracting the ball to teammates in space. He was moved around in the second half, from half-back to half-forward and did not have as much impact as the first half through the guts, but he was still very solid and got to the right positions when required.

#7 Mitch Martin

Some players seem to step up at the higher level, and Mitch Martin was one of those players today. At the Rebels, Martin is always solid, but with the extra time and space, and plenty of midfield minutes, he thrived on the open spaces of Ikon Park. His kicking was sublime and equally matched by his vision. He is not a huge accumulator, but every time he won it, he seemed to use it well, setting up Flynn Perez for a goal in the third term. He almost kicked one himself after a good mark but missed to the right.

#8 Lachlan Williams

Cracked in hard and while he was another who did not win a lot of it, he had a couple of ‘wow’ moments in the third term. He used great vision to kick inside to Fraser Phillips, then teamed up with Phillips again with a pin-point pass to his teammates’ advantage amongst a pack of Queensland opponents who had zoned off in defence.

#9 Fraser Phillips

Building a rich vein of form of late and that continued on the weekend, with some really good play inside 50. He is a good runner and moved up to half-forward well, kicking inside 50 with good precision. He lowers the eyes when entering the 50 and gave his teammates chances to score. Booted a goal early in the peace by running back with the flight and nailing the short-range set shot, and just missed a couple of chances later on in the game.

#10 Leo Connolly

Provided good pressure on his opponents to force turnovers, and in one instant, took a mark off the next possession from the turnover. Laid a massive tackle early to bring his opponent to ground and keep the ball in the middle.

#12 Isaac Wareham

Not his best game, but was playing a defensive role in the back half. Just kept a close eye on his opponent at all times.

#13 Izaac Grant

Ultra-impressed with what Grant showed at IKON Park. Coming into the game I hoped to see if he could play a role other than the pigeonholed small forward which he has been thus far, and he showed some serious intent, not just in the midfield, but in contested situations as well. He was a lovely kick in space and not only used quick hands, but blocked an opponent while handballing to a teammate to give his teammate an extra couple of seconds. One of the better field kicks out there, and still showed his vertical leap. Did not kick a goal which is his forte, but his game was better than matches where he has kicked multiple goals – another string to his bow.

#14 Tye Hourigan

He plied his trade in defence as he usually does for Gippsland with commitment. While he only stands at 188cm, Hourigan is very capable in a key position role and is difficult to move off the ball. He generally reads the ball before his opponent, as shown during the third term when he took a strong intercept mark. More of a stopper at this stage, but I feel there is another offensive gear in him.

#15 Jake Van der Plight

Was in and out of the game a bit, but generally produced quality moments when he got his hands on the ball. Starting mostly on the wing, he ran up and down the ground, winning an excellent ground ball in the defensive 50 during the third term which was sharply released by hand. He is a lovely size at 188cm and is capable of playing multiple positions. He is another Gippsland bottom ager to keep an eye on next year.

#16 Jesse Clark

Clark looks an interesting type behind the ball. He was particularly calm when he gained possession in the defensive arc, displaying good skills and well thought out decisions. During the second term he was given the ball under pressure deep inside defensive 50, but found a teammate in the corridor by foot with minimal fuss to release the immediate pressure. I’m looking forward to having a closer look over the next 15 months or so.

#17 Riley Ironside

After a relatively quiet first half, Ironside came to life in the third term with a lovely left foot pass inside 50 to Martin. That classy piece of play saw him become more involved and while he shanked a set shot not long after, he started having an influence at the stoppages and spread to offensive positions. He hit another brilliant left foot pass inside 50 to Williams in the final quarter to show he has some forward of centre weapons at his disposal.

#19 Jimmy Boyer

Boyer was another player who was dangerous running out of the back half, moving the ball forward with speed whenever he got the opportunity. Vic Country looked likely of scoring when he had the ball and his kicking was first rate on most occasions. While his offensive football was what immediately stood out, he also laid a heavy tackle in the third term to earn a holding the ball free kick.

#20 James Schischka

The Bendigo Pioneer was one of Vic Country’s better players on the day, controlling things in defence with his ability to read the play quickly and peel off his man when required. He took two strong intercept marks in the first term that appeared to spark his confidence to get to as many aerial contests as he could. While there were times he had to play deep KPD, when the opportunity presented he would look to swap with an opponent and get in the dangerous space. He laid a vital tackle in the final term to finish off a very solid outing.

#21 Darcey Chirgwin

Chirgwin was one of Vic Country’s more impressive performers and arguably produced the most transferrable AFL attributes. He is a tall inside midfielder who stands 190cm and while he looked lanky at times, he presented moments of class and time under pressure that would have excited the club representatives in the stands. In the first half he spun around an opponent with ease to kick inside 50. Later in the game after being disposed, he gathered the ball cleanly, regained balance and brilliantly hit a target near the arc. He looks a likely type.

#22 Sam De Koning

Battled well by manning some of Queensland’s taller forwards. He killed a few long Queensland entrances and took the kick outs on occasions. He perhaps would have liked to use the ball better at times, but is usually a reliable kick.

#23 Zac Skinner

Having lacked opportunities at Gippsland due to so many other tall options, Skinner would have enjoyed the chance to spend more extended periods on the ground. He started the game well, taking a mark on the lead inside 50 early in the first term. He was then rotated in the ruck, showing a soft touch in the air and was especially clean below his knees for a 199cm kid. He has composure with the ball and often makes good decisions by hand.

#24 Bigoa Nyuon

The 195cm Nyuon provided some eye catching athleticism with his minutes forward and in the ruck, especially the latter where his outstanding vertical leap often won him the hit out. He gave his midfielders some excellent taps to advantage without breaking stride and competed defensively when the ball hit the ground. He didn’t win much of the ball, but that will come with further development.

#25 Josh Smith

The big, bullocking forward had a day out inside 50, kicking four goals and had a huge influence on the result. He made his presence known early in the game, taking a strong mark in the pocket and kicking truly with a brilliantly executed banana set shot. He demanded the ball all day and took a huge contested mark inside 50 during the third quarter. His work wasn’t all done in the air either, as he cleanly picked up a ground ball in the fourth term to set up a scoring chain. His fourth goal gave Vic Country the lead to end a great outing in the best possible way.

#26 Aaron Gundry

The 198cm Bendigo tall struggled to get consistently involved, but showed signs throughout the game forward and at times in the ruck. His best moment came deep inside in the pocket where he cleanly collected the ball and handballed to Smith for a goal assist.

Queensland:

By: Michael Alvaro and Ed Pascoe

#1 Danial Davidson

Davidson was slow to come into the game but began to rack up more possessions as the contest wore on. His tackling was good as a smaller midfielder, and he showed a willingness to attack the ball when the game was up for grabs in the second half.

#3 Hawego Paul Oea

The smooth moving forward posed a threat throughout the game with his pace and ability to find space in good areas. With ball in hand, Oea looked to move it on more often than not and was a valuable link between the wing and forward 50. He provided a smart assist to Will Martyn with a cutting ball from near the boundary in the fourth term, putting his smarts on full show.

#5 Corey Joyce

Joyce covers the ground really well and showed a solid work rate from the wing. While he didn’t rack up as much of the ball as in previous Maroons outings, Joyce was clean in possession and showed good agility in traffic. He has the potential to play above his size too, as he gets himself in handy positions to intercept and impact contests around the ground.

#6 Jack Wingrave

Wingrave was entrusted with the kick-out duties early on and spent most of his time in the defensive half. His long kicking out of the back is an asset, and he used it to good effect when clearing his own arc. A highlight of Wingrave’s game was a tough tussle with Country’s Fraser Phillips late in the piece, where the two battled hard for the ball deep in Country’s 50 with little separating the sides, showing his willingness to compete.

#7 Lachlan Barry

Sporting a yellow headband, Barry did not find huge amounts of the ball in his deep forward role but had a decent last quarter. He laid a hard tackle in the final term and hit up big-man Samson Ryan with a pin-point pass into the forward 50, which was his best moment.

#8 Coby Williams

Williams was another who was quiet until later on, but he made his presence felt with a big tackle on Country star Jye Chalcraft in the fourth quarter, as well as a nice intercept mark in the centre square to cap off his day.

#9 Connor Budarick

The skipper was one of the Maroons’ best throughout the day with an all-round performance from midfield. The Allies and Gold Coast Academy star has good speed around the contest and showed tenacity to win much of his own ball from the stoppages. He may be small in stature, but Budarick is solid and stood up in tackles – despite being caught holding the ball once in the third term. He bounced back from that with a nice take-on and run from half-back not long after.

#10 Jack Moseley

Moseley showed glimpses of promise from half-back, looking a natural footballer. Despite starting off with a crude in the back free kick against him, he went on to prove his worth with displays of agility and a cool head in traffic. His highlight was managing to deliver a perfect kick to Hawego Paul Oea after keeping his hands up and evading a tackler, showing off a bit of class.

#14 Will Martyn

Martyn was arguably his side’s best in an industrious midfield shift. While he was fumbly early on, the Brisbane Academy member continued to crash in and win the ball out of the stoppages through brute force. Martyn’s kicking improved alongside his handling as the game progressed, with some good balls inside 50 providing scoring opportunities. His final term was particularly impressive, as he stood courageously under a loopy ball to take a mark and slot his first goal, backing it up shortly after with a second set shot major to put his side in front, with an early celebration to boot.

#15 Bruce Reville

The wingman was another Maroon to really impress with good athletic traits and a knack for finding the footy in dangerous areas. Reville has good handles and can gather the ball at pace, highlighted by a nice gather at speed from a third term centre bounce. Based on the wing for most of the game, Reville had a brief stint at the centre bounces to start the second half, but quickly moved back outside where he continued to assist his forwards with effective inside 50 entries.

#16 Campbell Aston

Aston was quiet but battled hard in the back half, recording nine disposals. His highlight was a solid grab against the highly touted Riley Baldi in the first term where he showed good attack on the footy.

#17 Josh Gore

Gore continued his good form in the Queensland jumper with another effective display up forward. While he only managed the one major this time around, Gore had plenty of opportunities and was able to find the ball inside 50 well. His goal came from a decent mark backing deep towards the goalsquare in the second term, and he converted the set shot. Gore worked to find the ball further up the ground in the second half and proved calm when delivering the ball forward. He also laid a solid holding the ball tackle in the third quarter to cap an all-round game.

#18 Brandon Deslands

Deslands started the game in defence and was trusted with a kick out, you used his solid kicking up the ground more in the third and fourth quarter. Deslands managed to get some time in the midfield in the last quarter getting involved and laying a nice tackle.

#19 Gracen Sproule

Sproule played as a forward and he showed great movement and skill throughout the day. His best quarter came in the second when he kicked a nice long goal from beyond 50. What stood out from Sproule was his clean takes on the run and clean use by hand and his ability to move through traffic.

#21 Matthew Fraser

Had a quiet day but he looked good at ground level with his front and square work really impressing, he read the ball well and was clean at ground level. Fraser was not afraid to tackle and have an impact when the ball was in his area.

#22 Thomas Jeffrey

Jeffrey was impactful with his strong marking ability and long kicking being used to effect all over the ground. He had a lovely kick inside 50 in the 2nd quarter and got involved in a nice passage of play in the last quarter showing both his good marking and kicking ability.

#23 Sam Butler

A good user of the ball throughout the day, his best moment came with a good long kick to the hot spot in the first quarter hitting up teammate Matthew Conroy. Butler was neat with his handballing and his kicking was sound.

#24 Nickolas Haberer

Haberer played well down back taking some nice intercept marks and providing some good spoils and using his body well in one-on-one contests. Haberer did the defensive acts well with good tackling and spoiling while also using the ball well down back.

#26 Matthew Conroy

Conroy made a statement in the first half kicking a nice set shot goal in the first quarter and kicking a long bomb in the second quarter which hyped up his team. He competed well in the ruck and up forward before a quieter second half.

#27 Ashton Crossley

Queensland’s best player on the day, Crossley was industrious through he midfield using his strong body to crash packs and win the contested ball. Early in the game he had a few long kicks which were not accurate, but he improved as the game went on with one of his kicks in the last quarter coming from a nice mark and then unleashing a long penetrating kick out wide. His strong marking and contested ability was important for Queensland around the ground and he was a solid four-quarter player.

#28 Max Newman

Newman did some nice things down back with some timely spoils with one on the last line in the third quarter. Not a huge game but played his role well. 

#30 Joshua Hammond

Hammond was one of the better defenders for Queensland with some fantastic spoiling efforts especially in the first quarter where he was most prominent. Hammond did not get much of the ball but he did not give his opponents an inch and if he was not spoiling he was tackling hard and blocking for teammates. With a bit more confidence it would be good to see how well he could rebound himself to really make him a more complete modern day defender. 

#32 Thomas Wischnat

Wischnat was a permanent forward often giving good leads but wasn’t always rewarded. He kicked a nice snap goal in the first quarter and he took a nice lead up mark in the 2nd although he missed the set shot. Wischnat could have done more at ground level but also could have hit the scoreboard harder with better supply from teammates.

#33 Sampson Ryan

The 203cm Ryan not only use his height to his advantage in the ruck, but also managed to keep involved all over the ground working into defence to intercept and also resting forward, providing a good option despite spraying many of his opportunities at goal. What stood out with Ryan was his smarts around the ground for a ruckman with some nice visions by hand and even a solid opposite foot kick in the last quarter.

Country girl Caris passing on lessons from “amazing experiences”

WHEN the siren sounded at the end of last year’s Herald Sun Shield Grand Final, Ballarat Grammar’s Rene Caris joined her teammates in rejoicing the win. It was not just a one-point victory, it was the result of many years of hard work and a close bond between the players.

“I first started when I moved away to boarding school in Year 10 and then a few of us all us boarders from farms in the country, we all just decided to start playing footy,” Caris said. “So we just joined the footy team at school, it wasn’t very high standard or anything but we just did it for a bit of fun. “When we were in Year 12 and we worked for three years to win the Herald Sun Shield and I was with all my best friends that I’d been in the boarding house with, and we ended up winning that game by a point – that was probably one of my most favourite experiences.”

Hailing from Quantong, a small town 15km west of Horsham, Caris knows the challenges associated with living in a rural area more than most.

“I did Auskick as a kid obviously,” she said. “Dad was the coach so I went along to that, but kind of stopped when I was about 12 I think. “You couldn’t obviously play girls footy past 14 so obviously that limits a lot of opportunities but yeah moving to Ballarat was the next best step I think so now I’ve eventually moved to Melbourne and there’s even more opportunities there.”

Caris is using the experience of playing with the Greater Western Victoria (GWV) Rebels, Vic Country and the AFL Women’s Academy to help teach others how to improve and play to their full potential.

“It’s been an amazing experience,” Caris said. “I’ve learnt so much and I think it’s just great how us three girls from the Academy (Caris, Sophie Van De Heuvel and Georgia Clarke) can learn stuff at such a high level and teach these girls when we come back. “Even take it even further back when we go back to our clubs at home, like in Horsham. “So I feel like the word about playing girls footy has spread out a bit which is good.”

The strength in girls football is improving rapidly, and Caris cannot help but smile at how many aspiring female footballers are taking up the sport at her home club.

“Yeah definitely (it’s improving),” Caris said. “Last year I was part of Horsham girls. “Horsham Saints had a team, and you can already see how much the girls love it, they want to play, but there just really isn’t much of an opportunity and now there is. “There’s so many little Year 7s running around, it’s amazing.”

Caris is an athletic ruck who has stood out since returning from a back injury that kept her out of the early games in the TAC Cup Girls season. She played for the AFL Women’s Academy against Geelong Victorian Football League (VFL) Women’s side at GMHBA Stadium, and represents Carlton in the same league.

The 19 year-old recalls her first training session at Ikon Park.

“It will be incredible (playing for Carlton),” she said. “Just been at the trainings, I was already star-struck with Darcy Vescio being my training partner in the warm-up. It’s going to be incredible to learn from these girls.”

After a successful stint as Vic Country’s ruck at the AFL Women’s Under 18 Championships, and showing off her versatility around the ground, Caris is hoping to finish the year on a high and improve her strength and marking, something she admits will come “hand-in-hand”.

With height and athleticism at a premium in the AFL Women’s, like every talented Victorian representative, everyone will be keeping a close eye on the country girl who is turning heads in the big smoke.

Raw ruck talent learns to juggle workload

FINDING diamonds in the rough are what every recruiter and talent manager looks for, and if Geelong’s VFL Women’s and Geelong Falcons’ trial days are anything to go by, they are finding plenty of future footballers. For ruck Zoe Inei, it was about swapping the round ball for it’s oblong counterpart.

“I played soccer for six years and then I went to the VFL Cats Women’s Trial Day and then from that I just got into it for a bit of fun with one of my friends from school,” she said. From that (Trial Day), [Geelong Falcons Female Talent Manager] Katie (Geerings) came up to me and asked if I wanted to play and was talking to me a bit about the soccer. “Then I got an email asking if I wanted to play Falcons, so that was my first season and then I played local last season and now I’ve played my second season of Falcons.”

In 2018, Inei has been a key contributor to the Falcons’ outfit, providing a strong presence around the ruck contests, but also covering the ground with her athletic nature on show. Having had the extra season under her belt, Inei is feeling more comfortable playing at the level.

“It’s been really good.,” Inei said. “It’s very good because it’s longer, last season was five weeks and now it’s nine. “So it’s been really good just so we can have extra time with the other girls, and the coaching has been really good as well, the team’s really fun.”

A raw talent with plenty of improvement left, Inei said she knew there was plenty to work on, and she was striving towards becoming the best possible player she could be.

“I think (what I’m) looking to improve on is just a bit more skills and bit more speed and decision making with the skills,” she said. “Then I think a strength of mine is more encouraging my teammates and going hard at it.”

Her decision making and balancing is something she has had to get better at, as the workload between school and football increases and she learns how to deal with everything thrown her way.

“It’s alright because I have quite a few spares at school so I get most of my stuff done at school,” Inei said. “It’s good because I just come to footy and I just squish in whatever else around other times.”

Still unsure of what she wants to do as a career pathway, she knows where she wants to go with her football.

“Well so far, I just know after that (Vic Country representation) finishes I’ll be going to play local Under 18s comp and from there I’ll just see what happens,” she said.

Her dream is to play AFL Women’s like so many others, and she has been building a nice resume in the process as she looks to become as versatile as possible.

“So I have been playing ruck mostly,” she said. “But this season Jason (Armistead, Geelong Falcons Girls coach) has been putting me forward for a rest. “That’s been good, I’m happy to just go wherever they want.”

Now Inei will focus on finishing off the year and hopefully chasing that dream she has followed since she jumped codes.