Tag: Trent Bianco

Draft Central Player of the Week: NAB League Boys – Round 11

SANDRINGHAM Dragons’ Darcy Chirgwin made more than just a successful return to NAB League Boys action, earning our Draft Central Player of the Week nomination for Round 11. Chirgwin returned to the Dragons’ side for their top-of-the-table clash with Eastern Ranges, having missed the first half of the season due to injury. Needing to get back to have any chance of playing in Vic Country’s last couple of matches in what could be a successful national carnival for the side, Chirgwin excelled.

The Ranges got the points on the day, but Chirgwin’s ability to not only win the footy with ease, but lay a massive 16 tackles in his return was hailed by his side. He finished the Round 11 match with 32 disposals, five marks, three inside 50s and two rebounds, as well as his match-high tackle count. He won our Player of the Week nomination after winning the Facebook poll against Gippsland Power’s Fraser Phillips. Chirgwin becomes the first Sandringham Dragons player to take out the nomination this season, but remarkably the ninth metropolitan-based club member. He does have a tie to Country however, moving from Geelong Falcons – and famous club St Mary’s – to board at Melbourne Grammar, which is why he is eligible for Vic Country at the national carnival.

DRAFT CENTRAL PLAYER OF THE WEEK:

ROUND 1: Noah Anderson (Oakleigh Chargers)
ROUND 2: Mitch Mellis (Eastern Ranges)
ROUND 3: Matt Rowell (Oakleigh Chargers)
ROUND 4: Tom Green (GWS GIANTS Academy)
ROUND 5: Zakery Pretty Eastern Ranges)
ROUND 6: Trent Bianco (Oakleigh Chargers)
ROUND 7: Sam Conforti (Bendigo Pioneers)
ROUND 8: Darcy Cassar (Western Jets)
ROUND 9: Lucas Rocci (Western Jets)
ROUND 10: Jordan Jaworski (Eastern Ranges)
ROUND 11: DARCY CHIRGWIN (SANDRINGHAM DRAGONS)

Anderson and Rowell star as Vic Metro claims first championship win

HEADLINED by top-rated draft prospects Noah Anderson and Matt Rowell, Vic Metro sealed its first win for the 2019 Under 18 Championship carnival with a grinding 17 point victory against South Australia at Alberton Oval. The score line was kind to the Croweaters as an inaccurate Metro kept the door slightly ajar for a South Australian comeback.

Both sides started slowly with Vic Metro’s Hugo Ralphsmith breaking through to kick the first goal of the game. South Australia responded as South Adelaide’s Daniel Sladojevic combined with club teammate Darnell Tucker to kick SA’s first for the contest. Metro took a slight advantage into the first break as theme of low scoring continued from the Western Australia and Allies match-up in the curtain raiser. The second quarter saw Vic Metro come firing out of the blocks with Rowell and Jack Mahony dominating clearances and the ground ball with Mahony hitting the scoreboard with a goal to extend Metro’s lead. Emerson Jeka profited from frequent inside 50 entrances with two marks from commanding leads but was unable to convert, kicking minor scores. Anderson showed his effectiveness when pushed up forward taking a solid mark inside 50, but was also unable to convert. South Australia’s Karl Finlay and Will Day stood strong in defence despite the constant Vic Metro inside 50 entries, resulting in Metro only leading by 18 points at the main break.

After the main break, South Australia roared into contention as Sturt’s Jed McEntee kicked truly from the set-shot after intercepting a wayward Metro kick in their defensive 50. Glenelg’s Brady Searle got another for the Croweaters and suddenly South Australia closed the gap to single goal with underager Luke Edwards’ brilliant checkside-snap goal. Unfortunately for South Australia, that’s where their best period of the match ended as Metro’s star quality shone through as the Big V powered away to a 30-point lead at the final break. Josh Worrell’s forward pressure was a sight to behold for a player of his size as a direct smother inside 50 resulted in a momentum-changing goal for Metro. Anderson then kicked his first for the match, kicking a great goal off one step from 45 meters out and Jeka was able to kick his first goal of the championships. The final quarter proved to be South Australia’s, kicking three goals to Vic Metro’s one but still unable to give Metro a scare. Tucker kicked a great goal from a tight angle as Searle kicked his second for the game. Sturt’s Josh Shute was eye-catching in the final quarter with his inside 50 entries but was overshadowed by the class of Rowell who continued to win every ball at ground level he contested. Anderson kicked another great goal from across his body just inside the 50 to top off a wonderful performance. Oliver Grivell kicked a consolation goal for the Croweaters which saw SA handed their first loss in the Championships since 2017.

Metro skipper Anderson was best afield finishing with 27 disposals, seven inside 50s and two goals, while Oakleigh teammate Rowell was outstanding once more with 26 touches, seven marks and four clearances. After four goals in the loss to Western Australia, Worrell continued his goalkicking form adding another three to his tally. Mahony provided support to Rowell with 22 disposals and eight inside 50s, while Trent Bianco and Lachlan Potter also provided plenty of run off half-back. Harry Schoenberg was tireless for South Australia leading the stat sheet with 29 disposals, seven marks and seven tackles. Finlay and Day were impressive in defence for SA, as defensive lieutenant Will Gould was continually moved across defence and forward. Port Adelaide father-son Jackson Mead was consistent with 25 disposals and nine tackles while Sturt pair McEntee and Shute were also serviceable.

Next round, both teams will travel to GMHBA stadium, with South Australia facing Vic Country and Vic Metro face winless Allies.

SOUTH AUSTRALIA 1.2 | 1.3 | 4.4 | 7.8 (50)
VICTORIA METRO 1.4 | 3.9 | 8.10 | 9.13 | (67)

GOALS

South Australia: Searle 2, Edwards, McEntee, Grivell, Sladojevic, Tucker
Vic Metro: Worrell 3, Anderson 2, Mahony, Mott, Ralphsmith, Jeka

BEST

South Australia: H.Schoenberg, W.Day, J.Mead, K.Finlay, J.Shute, B.Searle
Vic Metro: N.Anderson, M.Rowell, J.Mahony, J.Worell, T.Bianco, D.Mott

Scouting notes: AFL U18 Championships – South Australia vs. Vic Metro

THE highly-fancied Vic Metro team finally got on the board with an impressive 17-point win over South Australia away from home. Tom Wyman was on hand to review the action, and take some opinion-based notes on the outstanding players.

South Australia:

#1 Kysaiah Pickett

Much like the first game, ‘Kossie’ showed glimpses of his brilliant talent but was unable to have a genuine influence on the game for long enough. He presented himself well, had sharp hands in-close and looked threatening when the ball was in his vicinity, but it was ultimately not his day with Metro on top.

#7 Dylan Stephens

The Norwood midfielder gathered 18 touches playing a typical inside/outside role in the South Australian midfield. However his ball use for much of the day was inaccurate with many leading to turnovers. Despite this, he worked hard all day, but will be looking to improve in the remaining two matches.

#10 Joshua Shute

The South Australian wingman was amongst his side’s best on the day, collecting 19 disposals. He showcased excellent vision to pinpoint a kick inside-50, leading to a shot on goal in the final term, before following it up minutes later with a strong contested mark. There are a number of traits to like with Shute, who would have impressed a few on the day.

#12 Will Day

Day produced yet another strong performance in defence for the Croweaters. His athleticism and aerial ability are fast becoming trademarks of his game, with his intercept marking and ball use excellent for the majority of the afternoon. Although his light frame saw him taken to ground on multiple occasions, there is a reason why recruiters view Day as a high-potential pick once he is able to add size.

#15 Harry Schoenberg

Woodville-West Torrens on-baller Harry Shoenberg was the leading possession winner on the ground, finishing with 29 disposals. Perhaps the Croweaters’ best performer in an otherwise uninspiring showing, Shoenberg was seemingly everywhere, with a strong tackle in the opening term leading to a holding the ball. His ability to find the ball at will should appeal to AFL recruiters.

#18 Jackson Mead

Potential Port Adelaide father/son Jackson Mead was again effective through the middle for South Australia. Early in the first term he set the tempo with multiple clearances and a strong tackle. However, like many of his teammates, Mead wasted the ball on multiple occasions, with a momentum killing inside-50 turnover particularly standing out. Was strong in the contest throughout, however, opposed to a talented Metro midfield brigade.

#19 Luke Edwards

Potential Crows father/son Luke Edwards showed why he should be included amongst the top prospects in the class of 2020. At 187cm he is a good size which allows him to compete strongly one-on-one against the top-aged boys. With 18 disposals, Edwards had no issues finding the football. He generally used it well, playing across half-back (at times stationing himself in ‘the hole’ in-front of the key forwards) and also in an inside midfield role. Dribbled home a goal in the third term in an attempt to kickstart SA after half-time. Certainly one to watch for next year.

#22 Harrison Magor

North Adelaide on-baller Harrison Magor spent time on Metro stars Matthew Rowell and Noah Anderson at different stages throughout the day. He was particularly busy early on and finished the day with 18 disposals.

#23 Brady Searle

Searle did some handy things for South Australia, including nailing two shots and taking a strong mark, however his impact was admittedly limited until the final term with the game almost beyond doubt. Likely did enough to hold his position for the next game.

#24 Will Gould

Gould was solid, if unspectacular, in the 17-point loss. Starting the day forward, he was unable to get going early on but returned to the backline soon enough, where he was able to get his hands on the football. With the likes of Karl Finlay and Dyson Hilder taking the key forwards, Gould was able to play his natural role as the ‘kicker’ out of half-back. He was composed and hit most of his targets by foot.

#35 Karl Finlay

Full-back Karl Finlay stood up well despite his side conceding a multitude of inside-50’s. With his socks pulled up in typical fashion, Finlay reinforced his claim as one of the leading key defenders in the draft class.

Victoria Metro:

#1 Jack Mahony

Small forward/midfielder Jack Mahony was busy early and concluded the outing with 22 disposals with his pressure and intensity key features. A run-down tackle, backed up by an accurate set-shot got the Vics going in the second quarter.

#5 Trent Bianco

Bianco was again impressive in his role as a small defender off half-back for Metro. He collected 25 disposals, with many of them providing meaningful damage from defence. His run and carry was crucial in driving his side forward.

#11 Matthew Rowell

It was another typical, workmanlike day at the office for star Matthew Rowell. His enormous work-rate was evident throughout the day as he battled hard, doing a high proportion of the grunt work for Metro. He finished the outing with 26 disposals, with his run and carry, strength overhead and efficient hands in-tight of particular note.

#24 Noah Anderson

Anderson, skipper of the victorious Metro side, led from the front in what was likely a best on ground performance. Clearly a class above his opponents, Anderson nailed two goals for the visitors, with his sharp kicking (over long and short distances), vision and decision-making standing out. He collected a team-high 27 disposals and was also an aerial threat up forward, doing his pick one aspirations no harm.

#29 Fischer McAsey

The Sandringham Dragon defender was solid all throughout the contest, playing as a key defender. McAsey did some of his best work in the air, taking multiple big grabs and completing a series of intercepts. Despite SA being renowned for their backline, McAsey was arguably the best defender on the ground as his stocks continue to rise.

#31 Joshua Worrell

After booting four goals against WA the week before, Josh Worrell added another three to his tally. The tall utility was dangerous in attack all day, constantly posing a threat to the South Australian defence. After South Australia kicked the opening two goals of the second half and appeared to be gaining the upper hand, Worrell’s smother and goal from the square halted the surge and swung the momentum back in favour of the Vics. His overhead marking was also notable.

#36 Emerson Jeka

In his first game of the Championships, Western Jet Emerson Jeka presented well at full-forward for the Victorians. Jeka took numerous marks on the lead however he could well have made a greater impact on the scoreboard, missing multiple set-shots. He proved difficult to contain, despite South Australia’s strong key defensive options.

Metro and Allies continue search for opening championships win

A BUMPER double-header sees the Under-18 national carnival hit South Australia, with the Allies and Vic Metro looking to get on the board against Western Australia and South Australia respectively. Check out all the teams and a preview for both games below.

ALLIES vs. WESTERN AUSTRALIA
Saturday June 22, 10:30am
Alberton Oval, South Australia

Western Australia will look to regain a positive record in the 2019 AFL National Under 18 Championships when they face the winless Allies on neutral territory to kick off a South Australian double-header.

The Sandgropers started magnificently in their Round 1 win against Vic Metro, but fell short on home turf against the fast-finishing South Australia last time out. They are set to maintain a relatively consistent starting lineup coming into this clash, with the all-important core of the team again remaining in tact. While Luke Jackson has consolidated his status as the nation’s best Under 18 ruck, the likes of skipper Deven Robertson and Riley Garcia have benefitted from his silver service at the stoppages to dominate that area. Runners like Jeremy Sharp and Trent Rivers have also shown flashes of brilliance off half-back, and bottom-ager Logan McDonald looks to have stamped his claim as the side’s number one forward after impressing in game two.

Perhaps the most exciting part of the game will be the x-factor in each side’s forward half, with Elijah Taylor and Liam Henry finding plenty of goals so far for WA, while the Allies have included Gold Coast Academy pair Hewago Paul Oea and Josh Gore in hopes of creating some spark inside 50. After conceding 18.8 against Vic Country, the Allies have also bolstered their back six with a couple of overagers – namely Dirk Koenen and James Peatling, while shifting Braeden Campbell to his more natural half-forward spot. Connor Budarick is another who faces a move from half-back, set to spend more time running through the middle among a formidable Allies engine room set-up which should be able to match up well against WA’s. Big-bodied Suns product Ashton Crossley will add to their contested ball-winning capabilities, and over-age GWS/Oakleigh mover Jeromy Lucas could find a spot on the wing or flanks at either end. The top-end class looks to be on WA’s side in this clash, but you cannot count the talented Allies out, with match-winners in the midfield and forward of centre who will look to lift the team after a disappointing first outing.

TEAMS

Allies:

B: 21. Luke Parks, 52. Dirk Koenen, 8. Tom Griffiths
HB: 36. Sam Thorne, 44. Nicholas Brewer, 42. James Peatling
C: 9. Mitch O’Neill, 15. Will Martyn, 1. Errol Gulden
HF: 5. Braeden Campbell, 31. Hamish Ellem, 4. Malcolm Rosas jnr
F: 37. Joshua Gore, 26. Liam Delahunty, 47. Jeromy Lucas
R: 51. Samuel Gaden, 22. Tom Green, 3. Connor Budarick
Int: 24. Joel Jeffrey, 20. Matt McGrory, 2. Hewago Paul Oea, 46. Noah Cumberland, 12. Ashton Crossley

In: D. Koenen, N. Brewer, J. Peatling, J. Gore, J. Lucas, H. Oea, S. Gaden, J. Jeffrey, A. Crossley
Out: N. Murray, J. Barling, M. Conroy, S. Collins, J. Rayner, O. Davis, B. Reville, W. Chandler, S. Ryan

Western Australia:

B: 13. Ben Johnson, 21. Jake Pasini, 36. Denver Grainger-Barras
HB: 17. Jeremy Sharp, 26. Trey Ruscoe, 35. Trent Rivers
C: 12. Regan Clarke, 10. Deven Robertson, 9. Tristan Hobley
HF: 18. Jai Jackson, 30. Reuben McGuire, 19. Elijah Taylor
F: 5. Liam Henry, 25. Logan McDonald, 39. Callum Jamieson
R: 32. Luke Jackson, 14. Chad Warner, 4. Riley Garcia
Int: 6. Cameron Anderson, 20. Jaxon Prior, 3. Tyrone Thorne, 24. Ronin O’Connor, 22. Max Murphy

 

SOUTH AUSTRALIA vs. VIC METRO
Saturday June 22, 12:50pm
Alberton Oval, South Australia

In the fixture that shaped early in the year as the game of the national carnival, South Australia and Vic Metro are set to lock horns in Saturday’s second game, with the sides showing quite differing form.

The hosts kicked off their title defence in style last week after a Round 1 bye, running over the top of WA away from home to pick up an impressive win. They will be without the only multiple goal kicker from that match though in Cameron Taheny, with the exciting forward picking up a groin injury. That means the likes of Kysaiah Pickett and Josh Morris will need to provide that spark inside 50 against a dynamic Metro defence, with Brady Searle also a handy front six inclusion. The balanced SA midfield looks quite set, with Jackson Mead consolidating his spot on the centre line, while Dylan Stephens and Jed McEntee add even more class and Will Day should be an important runner on the outside. Bottom-age talent Luke Edwards remains in the side after a promising display, joined by fellow ’02 birth Zac Dumensy as the only other bottom-ager in the team.

There is notable talent on each line for SA, putting them in good stead to compete across the board – but the midfield battle looks primed for Metro to win. The Victorians have made six changes as they continue to search for a win having come into the carnival as arguable favourites. Much of that is down to the individual brilliance of the likes of Noah Anderson and Matt Rowell, who have stood up in both games despite suffering two losses. The midfield remains relatively untouched, with a shuffle in the forward line seeing Emerson Jeka, Jamieson Rossiter, and Dylan Williams all coming into the team, while surprise leading goal kicker Josh Worrell stays on the forward flank. Northern’s Adam Carafa gets another chance alongside Andrew Courtney, while Carafa’s Knights teammate Nikolas Cox is one to watch as an athletic, tall wingman. The likes of Trent Bianco, Louis Butler, and Darcy Cassar – who all like to dash from defence – will all be kept accountable by the SA forwards, so may be tested once again for form. Up the other end, they will hope for a much bigger goal haul given their inclusions and the greater team balance they look to have. Expect a tense start, but plenty of highlights given the talent on paper from either side.

TEAMS

South Australia:

B: 30. Oliver Grivell, 35. Karl Finlay, 4. Jordan O’Brien
HB: 24. Will Gould, 33. Dyson Hilder, 19. Luke Edwards
C: 7. Dylan Stephens, 18. Jackson Mead, 10. Joshua Schute
HF: 23. Brady Searle, 43. Jamie Coff, 15. Harry Schoenberg
F: 1. Kysaiah Pickett, 32. Daniel Sladojevic, 17. Josh Morris
R: 37. Lachlan Burrows, 8. Jed McEntee, 20. Lachlan McNeil
Int: 22. Harrison Magor, 16. Zac Dumensy, 5. Darnell Tucker, 31. Jordan Moore, 12. Will Day, 11. Callum Park, 28. Oliver Shaw, 34. Jack Carpenter

In: J. Moore, B. Searle, Z. Dumensy, J. Coff, J. Carpenter, O. Shaw
Out: C. Taheny (injured), C. Durdin, D. Freitag

Victoria Metro:

B: 16. Darcy Cassar, 33. Corey Watts, 26. Ryan Sturgess
HB: 15. Louis Butler, 29. Fischer McAsey, 5. Trent Bianco
C: 24. Noah Anderson, 11. Matthew Rowell, 22. Miles Bergman
HF: 31. Joshua Worrell, 28. Jamieson Rossiter, 1. Jack Mahony
F: 23. Dylan Williams, 36. Emerson Jeka, 2. Mitch Mellis
R: 40. Nick Bryan, 25. Finn Maginness, 8. Adam Carafa
Int: 37. Andrew Courtney, 18. Lachlan Potter, 13. Daniel Mott, 21. Hugo Ralphsmith, 35. Nikolas Cox
Emg: 30. Harrison Jones, 9. Will Phillips

In: E. Jeka, A. Courtney, D. Williams, J. Rossiter, A. Carafa, N. Cox
Out: O. Lewis, J. Bell, H. Jones, J. Honey, C. Dean, J. Ross (all rotated)

BYE: Victoria Country

Draft Central Player of the Week: NAB League Boys – Round 10

A SEVEN-goal haul to Eastern Ranges’ Jordan Jaworski has seen the forward earn the Draft Central NAB League Boys’ Player of the Week nomination for Round 10. Jaworski becomes the third Eastern Ranges’ player this season, equalling fellow metropolitan side, Oakleigh Chargers for the most nominations this season. Jaworski’s 18-disposal, nine-mark, two-tackle and seven-goal game – the most goals kicked by an individual this season in the competition – saw him easily nominated, and then win the Facebook poll against fellow goalkicker, Oakleigh Chargers’ Jamarra Ugle-Hagan who booted five goals himself.

The game was just Jaworski’s third for the season, booting three goals in his first two games that came against Brisbane Lions Academy in Round 4, and Geelong Falcons in Round 9. He is averaging 14.3 disposals, 5.7 marks, 3.3 tackles, and now 3.3 goals. Jaworski follows the nominations of teammates, Mitch Mellis and Zakery Pretty earlier in the season, and snaps the back-to-back nominations by Western Jets. The Player of the Week nominations have been dominated by metropolitan sides this season, making up eight of the 10 nominees.

DRAFT CENTRAL PLAYER OF THE WEEK:

ROUND 1: Noah Anderson (Oakleigh Chargers)
ROUND 2: Mitch Mellis (Eastern Ranges)
ROUND 3: Matt Rowell (Oakleigh Chargers)
ROUND 4: Tom Green (GWS GIANTS Academy)
ROUND 5: Zakery Pretty Eastern Ranges)
ROUND 6: Trent Bianco (Oakleigh Chargers)
ROUND 7: Sam Conforti (Bendigo Pioneers)
ROUND 8: Darcy Cassar (Western Jets)
ROUND 9: Lucas Rocci (Western Jets)
ROUND 10: JORDAN JAWORSKI (Eastern Ranges)

Western Australia dashes Vic Metro’s title hopes with 17-point win

WESTERN Australia (WA) got its AFL Under 18 Championships off to the perfect start with a 17-point victory over Vic Metro at Lathlain Park.

WA 2.6 | 4.9 | 9.12 | 12.14 (86)
VIC METRO 2.2 | 4.5 | 5.7 | 10.9 (69)

GOALS
WA:
Henry 3, Johnson 2, Taylor 2, Thorne 2, Bennell, Rivers.
VM: Worrell 4, Jones 2, Rowell, Bianco, Honey, Dean.

BEST
WA:
Robertson, L. Jackson, Garcia, Rivers, Ruscoe, Pasini, Henry, Sharp, Taylor, Warner
VM: Rowell, Worrell, Mott, Butler, Sturgess, McAsey, Bianco

WA got off to a blistering start when Elijah Taylor took a strong contested mark inside 50 on the end of a Riley Garcia pass. Taylor went back and coolly slotted the first goal of the game, but Josh Worrell scored the reply for the visitors. WA then missed a host of chances, and Harrison Jones made them pay when he slotted Vic Metro’s second goal of the game. Late in the quarter, Jarvis Pina won himself a free kick, played on immediately and speared a pass to Callum Jamieson. Jamieson in turn, then found Jai Jackson inside 50. Jackson duly converted his set shot to give the Sandgropers a four-point lead at quarter time.

At the start of the second quarter, Liam Henry out-marked his opponent before playing on and drilling through his first goal of the game. Under siege for a period, Vic Metro tried to rebound the ball out of their defensive 50 via a number of handballs, but came unstuck when Ryan Bennell stole the ball off them, weaved his way past a couple of defenders and nailed another goal for WA. Matt Rowell and Worrell both kicked late goals to keep Vic Metro within touching distance of the home team.

After the main break, the Sandgropers came out firing with Trent Rivers kicking a long-range bomb in the second minute of the third term. Defender Ben Johnson then nailed two goals from outside 50 after receiving handballs from players who had just taken marks. Liam Henry and Tyrone Thorne both kicked goals soon after to give the home team a five goal lead at three quarter time.

Taylor produced a moment of magic early in the last quarter, when he gathered the ball, evaded an opponent, shrugged off another opponent and kicked brilliant snap from 50 metres. Worrell (twice) and Josh Honey kicked goals for the visitors, but Thorne and Henry both scored instant replies to push the margin back out to 23 points. In the dying stages of the game, Trent Bianco kicked a consolation goal for the visitors.

Captain Deven Robertson led the way for the Sandgropers with 31 possessions, seven clearances, five rebound 50s, five marks and four inside 50s. He was well supported by Garcia (21 possessions and seven clearances), Luke Jackson (12 possessions, 35 hit-outs and six clearances) and Rivers (22 possessions and a goal).

For Vic Metro, Rowell showed why he is considered a top three prospect, trying his heart out in the middle to will his team over the line. He finished with 24 possessions, eight clearances, six inside 50s and a goal. Other notable performers for the Big V included Worrell (18 possessions, six marks and four goals), Daniel Mott (24 possessions and eight clearances) and Louis Butler (23 possessions and seven rebounding 50s).

Next week WA host South Australia at Optus Stadium, while Vic Metro will use the bye to try and freshen up for their encounter with the Croweaters at Alberton Oval in Round 3 of the AFL Under 18 National Championships.

Scouting notes: AFL U18s – Western Australia vs. Vic Metro

WESTERN Australia started its AFL U18 Championships campaign with a stirring 17-point victory over the highly-fancied Vic Metro at Lathlain Park. It is the first time since 2015 that the Sandgropers have secured victory over their Victorian counterparts.

Below were the best players from either side.

Western Australia:

#4 Riley Garcia

The WA Leadership group member produced a performance that highlighted his credentials as one of the best prospects from WA this year. Against the Big V, Garcia collected 21 possessions, won an equal team-high seven clearances, laid four tackles, recorded four inside 50s and took three marks to be one of the best players on the ground. His kicking skills in the wet conditions were elite for someone his age.

#10 Deven Robertson

The WA Captain was inspirational for the Sandgropers, crashing his way through stoppages to win the ball for his team. He finished with a game-high 31 possessions, an equal team-high seven clearances, a team-high five rebound 50s, five marks, four inside 50s, and three tackles to be best afield. A highlight of his game was when he went back with the flight of the ball and took a courageous mark, before crashing into an opponent and team-mate.

#15 Liam Henry

The Fremantle Dockers NGA member was electrifying in the forward half for the Sandgropers, using his noted speed, dazzling agility and precise skills to provide an x-factor inside 50. He finished with 14 possessions, six tackles, four marks, four inside 50s and three goals in a dominant display. A highlight of his performance came in the second quarter, when he out-marked an opponent before playing on and drilling a goal from outside 50.

#17 Jeremy Sharp

The 2018 AFL U18s All-Australian was dynamic on the wing for the Sandgropers, often using his pace and skill to carve up the defence of Vic Metro. He collected 20 possessions, took three marks and recorded two inside 50s to be one of the best players on the ground.

#19 Elijah Taylor

The electrifying forward showed why he is being labelled as a possible draft bolter, showing flashes of brilliance in the forward half. He finished with 13 possessions, three inside 50s, two marks, two tackles and two goals. The highlight of his game came in the fourth quarter, when he cleanly picked up the ball, darted around an opponent, shrugged off another opponent and snapped through a goal from about 50m out.

#21 Jake Pasini

The key defender was exceptional in defence for the Sandgropers, winning many one-on-one contests, intercepting Vic Metro’s attacking forays and rebounding with class. The Swan Districts product finished with 10 possessions and six marks, while restricting Charlie Dean to just four possessions and a goal.

#26 Trey Ruscoe

Stationed at centre half-back, Ruscoe proved why WA officials rate him highly, with a stunning performance playing primarily on Harrison Jones. Ruscoe finished with 18 possessions, seven marks, three tackles and three rebounding 50s in a pivotal performance for the Sandgropers.

#32 Luke Jackson

The highly-touted ruckman produced a performance that indicated why he is considered to be a potential first-round pick. Up against Nick Bryan, Jackson gathered 12 possessions, won 35 hit-outs, won six clearances, laid three tackles, took two marks and recorded two inside 50s to stamp his authority on the game. His follow-up work around the ground has dramatically improved, making him an even more dangerous player.

#34 Ryan Bennell

A late addition to the WA U18s team, Bennell produced a performance that indicated he could be another bolter. The South Bunbury product finished with 11 possessions, five tackles, five inside 50s and a magnificent goal. Late in the second quarter, Vic Metro looked to rebound the ball out of defensive 50 via a number of handballs, but Bennell was able to steal it from them, weave his way past a couple of defenders and then drill through the goal from just inside 50.

#35 Trent Rivers

The East Fremantle product was outstanding off the half-back line and through the midfield for the Sandgropers. Rivers gathered 22 possessions, took four marks, laid three tackles, recorded three rebound 50s and two inside 50s, and kicked a telling goal in the third quarter. His composure and skill-level when under duress is outstanding for someone his age.

 

Vic Metro:

#5 Trent Bianco

The Oakleigh Chargers product showed why he is considered to be one of the best small rebounding defenders in this year’s draft pool. He finished with 17 possessions, six rebound 50s, four marks, four tackles, two inside 50s and a goal to be one of Vic Metro’s best. His run and carry, combined with his precise skills, make him a damaging player from the back half.

#11 Matthew Rowell

The much-fancied Rowell showed everyone why he is so highly touted. He gathered 24 possessions, won an equal game-high eight clearances, recorded six inside 50s, took four marks, laid four tackles and kicked a goal to be Victoria Metro’s best. His contested work around the stoppages was elite.

#13 Daniel Mott

The Maribynong Park junior was outstanding in the midfield for the Big V, often putting his head over the ball to get it going forward. He accumulated an equal team-high 24 possessions, won an equal game-high eight clearances, took seven marks, recorded three inside 50s and three rebound 50s, and laid two tackles in a powerful performance.

#15 Louis Butler

Stationed on the half-back line, Butler was prominent for the visitors with 23 possessions, seven rebound 50s, and four marks in a classy and polished performance. In a tough outing for the Victorian defenders, Butler showed excellent composure under duress, intercepted a host of WA’s attacking forays and displayed his penetrating kicking skills.

#24 Noah Anderson

The Victorian Captain tried to will his team through the middle with 16 possessions and seven clearances. His spread from the contest, work-rate, vision, decision-making and skill execution were all on display.

#26 Ryan Sturgess

The Northern Knights player tried his heart out for Victoria with a solid performance in defence. He finished the game with 17 possessions, seven marks, five rebound 50s and two tackles. His defensive marking and spoiling were a feature of his game, as was his reading of the play.

#29 Fischer McAsey

Stationed a centre half-back, McAsey was rock solid in defence for the Vics, intercepting a host of WA’s attacking forays. He finished with 11 possessions, six tackles, four marks, and two rebound 50s to arguably be Victoria’s best defender.

#31 Joshua Worrell

The Haileybury College student was Vic Metro’s most potent forward with 18 possessions, six marks, three inside 50s and four goals. Usually a defender for the Sandringham Dragons, Worrell showed excellent signs further afield with his leading patterns, set shot routine, and overhead marking all strong.

Draft Central Player of the Week: NAB League Boys – Round 9

WESTERN Jets’ captain Lucas Rocci has earned the nomination for Player of the Week for his superb effort in defence over the weekend. The Jets knocked off the Bendigo Pioneers at Downer Oval, and Rocci led from the front in his best game to date. Rocci claimed the Draft Central Player of the Week spot after winning the Facebook poll against Sandringham Dragons’ Kyle Yorke.

Rocci finished the outing with 34 disposals at 76.4 per cent efficiency, and of which 35.7 per cent were contested, as well as 12 marks, one clearance, one inside 50 and 12 rebounds. Coming into the match, Rocci had averaged the 13.7 disposals, 3.3 marks and just under two rebounds per game, but an increased role in the defensive half saw him star in the Jets’ victory. His nomination made it back-to-back nominations for the Western Jets after Darcy Cassar was the Draft Central Player of the Week in Round 8. He also becomes the seventh Metropolitan player to be nominated this season.

DRAFT CENTRAL PLAYER OF THE WEEK:

ROUND 1: Noah Anderson (Oakleigh Chargers)
ROUND 2: Mitch Mellis (Eastern Ranges)
ROUND 3: Matt Rowell (Oakleigh Chargers)
ROUND 4: Tom Green (GWS GIANTS Academy)
ROUND 5: Zakery Pretty Eastern Ranges)
ROUND 6: Trent Bianco (Oakleigh Chargers)
ROUND 7: Sam Conforti (Bendigo Pioneers)
ROUND 8: Darcy Cassar (Western Jets)
ROUND 9: LUCAS ROCCI (WESTERN JETS)

Draft Central Power Rankings: June 2019

AFTER a massive 2018 which saw so many talented players realise their dreams, we turn our attention to the 2019 AFL Draft crop. In the second edition of our monthly Power Rankings which is posted on the first Monday of every month, we have compiled our top 20 players at this stage of the year. So much changes over the next 12 months, with only bottom-age form and the first couple of months of the seasons to go by so far. Take note that the order is based purely on opinion and ability, not on any AFL club lists or needs. For our May monthly rankings, check out this link.

#1 Matthew Rowell

Oakleigh Chargers/Vic Metro | Inside Midfielder
01/07/2001 | 178cm | 75kg

Easily the most consistent player in the 2019 draft crop, having barely ever played a bad game. The inside midfielder is a tackling machine, averaging double-figure tackles at NAB League Boys level, while also racking up a massive 7.3 clearances per game. What is remarkable about Rowell is not only his ability to win the ball, but his ability to bring teammates into the game. Rowell is always looking to provide possession to a teammate in a better position, but when he needs to step up, Rowell is more than capable of finishing on his own. When at forward stoppages, Rowell has a nous of breaking away and snapping off his left as he did twice against Casey Demons on the MCG. There are plenty of candidates to the number one pick this year, but Rowell looks the 2019 equivalent of Sam Walsh – consistent across the board and just ticks all the boxes. He will spend the year playing school footy outside his National Under 18 Championships commitments before returning to the Chargers’ for their finals campaign.

May Ranking: #1

Last month: Rowell has been playing for Carey Grammar in the APS competition,  and was named best on ground in Carey’s 44-point victory over St Kevin’s in Round 2, where he booted four goals. Starred on the MCG as expected for Vic Metro in the loss to Vic Country on Saturday after a quiet start, but recovered to finish with 28 disposals and eight marks. Has not put a foot wrong this season.

#2 Noah Anderson

Oakleigh Chargers/Vic Metro | Inside Midfielder/Forward
17/02/2001 | 190cm | 87kg

In what was thought to be an anomaly last year with Henley High pairing Jack Lukosius and Izak Rankine touted as potential pick one and two, Anderson and Rowell both attend Carey Grammar, making it a daunting combo for any other APS school. Anderson is different to Rowell in the sense he is taller, has the ability to break open a game in a quarter, and has a booming kick that easily travels greater than 50 metres. He has enjoyed a consistent start to the year and has not done too much wrong, with his field kicking an area he could improve on at times. When inside the forward half, Anderson is one of the most damaging prospects in the draft crop, and expect him to have an impact around goals at the National Under 18 Championships for Vic Metro. His game-breaking ability is as good as anyone’s in the draft crop.

May Ranking: #2

Last month: Similar to Rowell, Anderson has not done too much wrong, being amongst the best for Carey Grammar in their strong season thus far in the APS competition. On the MCG, he and Rowell were the two best with the tall midfielder working hard for 25 disposals, five marks, five clearances and eight tackles, most importantly with 11 of his 16 kicks being effective.

#3 Hayden Young

Dandenong Stingrays/Vic Country | General Defender/Inside Midfielder
11/04/2001 | 188cm | 82kg

One of the prime movers last season and a player who has the potential to be a deadly half-back. He has elite kicking skills coming out of defence, aided by the fact he has a penetrating kick that can clear 50m with ease. He just gets to the right positions and pushes up the ground where he takes a number of intercept marks. He will contest any marking contest regardless of opponent, and is a composed user in defence. He was tried in the middle early in the season, but his greatest influence is in the back half. After an okay start to the year without being anything dazzling, Young reminded everyone of his talent on the MCG, starring alongside Rowell and Anderson, taking a number of crucial intercept marks and setting up scoring plays. A hard edge with terrific kicking skills, Young is one to certainly keep in mind for Pick 1.

May Ranking: #3

Last month: If Saturday’s opening game of the Under 18 National Championships is anything to go by, Young is the clear third best prospect, if not closing the gap to two above. The standout player on the ground, Young showed off his elite kicking skills with 29 disposals, seven marks, seven rebounds and two inside 50s – both of which came in the first term along with 10 touches when the heat was on. Importantly wins a lot of his touches from intercept marks, rather than handball receives and is the best kick in the draft crop.

#4 Lachlan Ash

Murray Bushrangers/Vic Country | General Defender
21/06/2001 | 186cm | 80kg

Along with Young, Ash is the other standout Country prospect in defence. The Murray Bushrangers runner has few flaws to his game, owning the defensive 50 with a massive amount of intercept marks and rebounds, while slicing up opposition zones with his elite kicking ability. He is a player that just catches the eye, gets himself into the right positions, and can set up teammates around the ground or in attack. He has hardly put a foot wrong this season, and while his performance on the MCG had its ups and downs, his NAB League form is not to be questioned. He will be a massive chance for the Morrish Medal if he stays fit, and is a crucial part of the Murray Bushrangers outfit. The noticeable advantage with Ash compared to a lot of half-backs is he can win his own ball, and while he might only win a third of his possessions in a contest, he is comparably low with handball receives, almost winning more touches from marking than from handballs. If he and Young both play off half-back at the National Under 18 Championships, expect Country to have plenty of run and penetration.

May Ranking: #5

Last month: If Young is the best kick in the draft crop, then this powerful user is the next best with terrific penetration and a variety of ways to hurt you coming out of defence or through the midfield. He racked up 21 disposals, at greater than 90 per cent efficiency, while also haveing five marks, two inside 50s and three rebounds for Vic Country on the weekend. Earned a spot higher in the rankings for his efforts as a clean ball user and damaging player.

#5 Tom Green

GWS GIANTS Academy/Allies | Inside Midfielder
23/01/2001 | 188cm | 85kg

The inside hard nut has drawn comparisons to Patrick Cripps in the way he excels at the contested ball, bullying his way to a truckload of possessions and clearances. He has clean and quick hands on the inside and a long kick, while having no issues whatsoever finding the pill. In the opening few NAB League games, Green racked up an average of 33 disposals and 10.25 clearances, still going at more than 60 per cent efficiency despite running at greater than 60 per cent contested. Across the board he is very consistent – similar to Cripps – in order to have an influence on the contest. He will be the top pure tall inside midfielder in the draft, with adding more scoreboard pressure the key between Green and the likes of Rowell and Anderson.

May Ranking: #4

Last month: The inside midfielder again acquitted himself very well over the weekend, backing up an impressive Academy Series by standing up against AFL-listed players in the GWS GIANTS’ win over Gold Coast in the NEAFL. Green had 28 disposals, three marks, four tackles, two inside 50s and two rebounds while booting a goal, to be one of the most consistent players this season. He might not be as flashy as others, but just gets the job done each and every week and is readymade for AFL football.

#6 Sam Flanders

Gippsland Power/Vic Country | Inside Midfielder/Forward
24/07/2001 | 182cm | 81kg

After playing as a damaging forward in 2018, Flanders has moved into the midfield this season and been one of the more prolific extractors. While it could be argued his greatest impact is around goals – where he seems to kick the impossible at times – he also has the nous in the midfield to find the ball at stoppages and kick long inside 50, or sweep the handball out to a running teammate. Gippsland has missed his influence and strength in attack, but he has added another dimension to a deep Power midfield. Flanders is a player who will divide draft watchers as he could be top five, or later first round depending on what you look at. He plays taller than his 182cm, and is strong overhead or at ground level. Another top-end Country prospect to watch this year.

May Ranking: #7

Last month: Rated highly for his match-winning ability, Flanders has also added a no-fuss approach to his game this season with some terrific inside work. He has some of the cleanest hands going around at ground level, with his kicking being a knock when he can blaze away by foot. He is doing everything right defensively, laying nine tackles at the MCG on Saturday, as well as 21 disposals and four marks, but will be keen to sharpen up his set shots, hitting the post on one occasion on his way to 1.2.

#7 Dylan Stephens

Norwood/South Australia | Balanced Midfielder
08/01/2001 | 182cm | 70kg

Stephens is another lightly built midfielder who despite being just 70kg has forced his way into the SANFL League side for Norwood already in season 2019. Given the Redlegs’ tendancy to restrict kids from being exposed at the top level – see Luke Valente last year – it is a credit to Stephens – and teammate Taheny, to already earn their stripes. He has held his own too, admitedly playing a very outside game, but with many bigger bodies at the Redlegs, Stephens has terrific skills and moves well in transition, able to win the ball in midfield, take off and kick perfectly inside 50. He still has to add bulk to his frame, but he showed when taking on his peers he is capable of playing an inside role as well. Expect him to be the prime mover for South Australia at the Under 18 Championships and raise his stocks with a big couple of months.

May Ranking: #12

Last month: Played his best SANFL League game to date on the weekend in Norwood’s big win over West Adelaide, posting up 25 disposals, six marks, five tackles, two clearances and six inside 50s. In season 2019, Stephens has averaged 17.6 disposals at 91 per cent efficiency, while averaging four marks, three tackles and 3.8 clearances. Has jumped to the top of the South Australian contingent.

#8 Caleb Serong

Gippsland Power/Vic Country | Small Forward/Midfielder
09/02/2001 | 178cm | 83kg

A tireless worker, Serong missed the opening game of the NAB League season and has been working his way back into the year finding plenty of the ball around the ground. For a smaller player, Serong never takes a backwards step and seems to find the ball in all three areas of the ground, having plenty of influence around the stoppages, particularly in the forward half. He is very strong overhead and brings his teammates into the game. Both he and close mate, Sam Flanders lead the Gippsland Power charge for draftees in what should be a big year for them. Will miss most of the NAB League season due to school and state commitments, but will be a welcome return come finals time.

May Ranking: #13

Last month: Was one of the best Country players in the Vic Country win over Vic Metro at the MCG on Saturday. So powerful on the inside for a smaller player, Serong racked up 22 touches, five clearances and laid seven tackles, pumping the ball inside 50 on four occasions as well. Is a player who can play midfield or forward and always brings the heat to the contest. Co-captain of Vic Country with Lachlan Ash as well.

#9 Will Gould

Glenelg/South Australia | Key Position Defender
14/01/2001 | 191cm | 98kg

The key defender is the player likely to be the big point of difference in the top-end of the rankings, but I rate him as the standout tall in the draft. At 191cm he is a tad undersized for a key position player, but he has the ability to play small or tall, and has been working on his tank to play midfield at times. He wins plenty of the ball at half-back and averages almost eight rebounds per game at League level for Glenelg – holding his own against bigger bodies and dropping into the hole with his game smarts reading the ball in flight well. He has leadership tendancies and captained the Australian Under 18s at the MCG against Casey Demons and will be a prime candidate for the South Australian job as well. Gould has put on seven kilograms since the championships last season, enabling him to take the more monster key forwards, and while he might still be undersized, he just competes and has a massive work rate which stands out each time he plays.

May Ranking: #6

Last month: Gould has remained in the Glenelg League side in the SANFL and is holding his own with 20 disposals, 5.7 marks and 6.7 rebounds playing in defence. A natural-born leader, Gould is the standout key position defender in the draft, and while talls often drift a bit, it will be interesting to see how he performs at the National Under 18 Championships.

#10 Dylan Williams

Oakleigh Chargers/Vic Metro | General Utility
01/07/2001 | 185cm | 81kg

After having a terrific second half of the year playing as a medium forward, Williams has spent time mixed between attack and defence in season 2019. He is definitely more suited to attack where he has a high vertical leap and is dangerous around goals. He is as strong overhead as anyone and certainly impressive for a player of his size. Not a huge ball winner, Williams just needs to find four quarter consistency this season as he is the player that can boot four goals in a term and take the game away from the opposition. He also has terrific skills, and hits three out of his four targets despite finding half his possessions in a contest. When at stoppages, Williams is more than capable of winning clearances as he showed against Dandenong, bursting away and pumping the ball long. One area of improvement is his defensive work, which is why he has been played in defence at times to build that area of his game. In the wet at Craigieburn against Calder Cannons in Round 2, Williams had eight out of 12 disposals effective, running at a much higher efficiency than his teammates. Does not have APS school commitments so will play the full year at NAB League Boys level with the Chargers, co-captaining the side with Trent Bianco.

May Ranking: #10

Last month: He did not have the greatest of starts to his championship campaign, injured in Vic Metro’s loss to Vic Country, and finishing with just the four disposals and two tackles. The week before he won the game for the Chargers with two final-quarter goals to get over the Knights, also amassing 18 disposals and five marks. Still hot and cold at times, Williams has that potential that shows he cannot drift that far from the top 10.

#11 Cameron Taheny

Norwood/South Australia | General Forward
03/08/2001 | 184cm | 80kg

The medium forward is an excitment machine who lit up the National Under 16 Championships in 2017. He continued that form in his bottom-age year for Norwood, booting six goals in a game last year to show off his talents inside 50. Similar to Dylan Williams, Taheny has his ups and downs, but his best is as good as anyone else’s in the draft crop. A good season could propel him into the top half of the first round, and he is a player who could turn a match on its head which will be crucial for South Australia at the National Under 18 Championships. Has already broken into the League side for Norwood and booted three goals on debut. One to watch through the year as someone who could rise.

May Ranking: #11

Last month: Has consolidated himself in the League side for Norwood along with Dylan Stephens, which has not been an easy thing to do for a forward. Taheny has benefited from a talented midfield, capitalising on his opportunities with 11 goals in three games at senior level, including a bag of five on the weekend where he also had six marks. He is knocking on the door of this top 10, and a good championships will see him leap into that group.

#12 Trent Bianco

Oakleigh Chargers/Vic Metro | Outside Midfielder
20/01/2001 | 176cm | 70kg

Arguably quite underrated given his size and the ability of his highly touted Oakleigh teammates, Bianco is one of the best ball users in the draft crop this season. Like Lachlan Ash, Bianco rebounds off half-back and can go into the middle when required, a place he will no doubt spend a lot of time this season having wrapped up his Year 12 studies last year. The co-captain of the Oakleigh Chargers is an outside ball user, and finding more contested ball could be an area he looks to in season 2019, but his skills are good enough that he could easily play as that outside user, especially considering his size. A versatile player, expect Bianco to be one of the Morrish Medal contenders this season when he is not running around for Vic Metro. He had a massive game against Tasmania Devils, racking up 42 disposals, although he did have seven clangers on the day. Keeps rising and despite being smaller, just finds the ball and uses it well more often than not.

May Ranking: #9

Last month: After a massive 42-disposal game back in Round 6 for the Chargers, Bianco had a quieter 17-disposal outing against the Knights, albeit laying 10 tackles in a great defensive effort. He was subdued on the MCG by his standards, finishing with 14 disposals, four marks, three clearances and four rebounds. Will no doubt have more impact going forward, and still looms as a crucial player in the Metro side.

#13 Mitch O’Neill

Tasmania Devils/Allies | Balanced Midfielder
21/02/2001 | 178cm | 69kg

The top Tasmanian prospect was an All-Australian in his bottom-age year, and has a nice blend of inside and outside capabilities. Given his lightly built frame, expect O’Neill to stick to the outside during the National Under 18 Championships, but he can win his own ball at the same time. He reads the taps well and is able to spread to the outside, pumping the ball inside 50 to set up scoring chains. Having spent time in defence last year, O’Neill has moved into the midfield and found just as much of the ball, and is a crucial ball user on the outside. He will be the player most analysed by opposition sides when playing Tasmania Devils in the NAB League, and O’Neill will enjoy added freedom at the National Under 18 Championships for the Allies.

May Ranking: #8

Last month: O’Neill returned from his ankle injury to play the last couple of matches for Tasmania Devils in the NAB League Boys competition. Slowly building back into it, O’Neill finished with 15 disposals and two goals drifting forward against the Stingrays in Round 8, before having 20 disposals on the weekend against the Rebels in the Devils’ win. O’Neill showed his clean ball use and running ability for the Allies in the trial matches against Victoria a fortnight ago and will have the benefit of an outside role at the championships.

#14 Jackson Mead

WWT Eagles/South Australia | Outside Midfielder
30/09/2001 | 183cm | 83kg

The son of Port Adelaide inaugural Best and Fairest winner, Darren has made a promising start to the 2019 SANFL season, starting in the Reserves and impressing, showing that a League debut would be in the not-too-distint future. Mead will team up with Stephens at the National Under 18 Championships to lead the side through his penetrating kick and good skills, spreading around and using the ball well forward of centre. Not as prolific a ball winner as some others, Mead has good smarts and does not waste too many disposals. Importantly, Mead hits the scoreboard as a midfielder, and can win his own ball on the inside when required. He might play more of an inside role at the National Championships, but South Australia will be keen to give him time and space to impact the contest best.

May Ranking: #14

Last month: Continues to play consistent football in the SANFL Reserves for Woodville-West Torrens, meaning a League call-up cannot be too far away. Mead has averaged 20.7 disposals at 74 per cent efficiency, while also averaging 3.3 marks, 4.0 clearances, 4.5 inside 50s and 2.8 tackles. Another player whose stocks will depend on how he fares at the championships.

#15 Brodie Kemp

Bendigo Pioneers/Vic Country | Tall Utility
01/05/2001 | 192cm | 82kg

Kemp is a player that will be looked at as a long-term prospect, and one who could be moulded into nearly anything. At 192cm, he has played a hybrid role over the past few years, rotating between attack and midfield, and even some time in defence. He knows how to hit the scoreboard and has a long kick but could tidy it up when at full-speed. His ability to get to the outside and move in transition is a strength. He is a smooth mover who looks like an outside player, but wins the majority of his possessions at the coal face. Another player who will miss the majority of the NAB League season due to his school football commitments, but will be one to watch at the National Under 18 Championships.

May Ranking: #16

Last month: Moves up a place on the back of a strong showing for Vic Country at the MCG on the weekend. His kicking at top-speed is still a concern, but the way he bursts off half-back and can split through opponents with ease is eye-catching. Played in defence on the weekend despite his best role being an inside midfielder, but had 16 disposals, four marks and six rebounds.

#16 Josh Worrell

Sandringham Dragons/Vic Metro | Key Position Defender
11/04/2001 | 193cm | 78kg

The Sandringham Dragons defender has had an impressive past few weeks after not having to do too much in the Dragons’ obliteration of Calder in the opening round of the NAB League season. On the MCG against Casey Demons, Worrell stood tall in defence, showing an ability to remain calm under pressure and use the ball well. At 193cm, Worrell will be a player that clubs look at differently, being that few cms smaller than the current trend for key position defenders, which is fine considering Worrell’s ability to provide run and carry out of defence. He is still lightly built, but he is strong overhead and has the potential to develop into a tall midfielder or one who roams off half-back and sets up attacking plays. A player who will spend the season at Haileybury College and Vic Metro before returning to the Dragons for the finals series.

May Ranking: #15

Last month: Worrell continues to show some nice signs, not one of the best but sitll a solid contributor at times for Metro in their loss to Country at the MCG on Saturday. Had 10 touches, five marks and three inside 50s playing higher up in defence, and will be used as that rebounding type more-so than his key position nature, but will still have the defensive abilities to nullify an opponent.

#17 Connor Budarick

Gold Coast SUNS Academy/Allies | General Utility
06/04/2001 | 176cm | 70kg

The Gold Coast SUNS Academy player could draw comparisons to Ned McHenry in both his stature and defensive pressure. Budarick played as a forward last year, and has spent more time in the midfield in 2019, but will likely rotate between both at the National Under 18 Championships. Weighing in at about 70kg, Budarick is outside leaning when in the midfield and just has little bursts where he wins the football. In the exhibition match against Casey Demons, Budarick played in defence and held his own back there, but his best comes forward of centre where he lays an average of seven tackles per game, and forces turnovers close to goal. He runs hard between the arcs and will likely cost Gold Coast a top 30 pick based on his skills and work rate.

May Ranking: #20

Last month: Hardly puts a foot wrong with anything he does. Was one of the Allies’ best in the trial game against Victoria, and despite his size, still plays an important role through the midfield. He will have the freedom to play on the outside and use his slick skills to advantage. The Allies line-up against Vic Country this weekend in what should be a cracker, and Budarick will be a key player.

#18 Jeremy Sharp

East Fremantle/Western Australia | Outside Midfielder
13/08/2001 | 187cm | 79kg

One of a number of East Fremantle potential draftees, Sharp is a skilled midfielder who is capable of playing off half-back as well as along the wing. He is not a massive ball winner, but he is a terrific kick of the footy and is a run-and-carry player. Along with Jackson, Sharp is a potential top 10 player who is a good size at 187cm and has added some bulk to his frame over the off-season. He is one of just three players who earned All-Australian honours as a bottom-ager last season following a magnificent Under 18 Championships. Sharp is one of those players you want the ball in their hands going forward as he will likely pinpoint a target inside 50. One to watch if he can go to another level at his top-age championships.

May Ranking: #17

Last month: The talented mover and ball user is one who will retain a place in the top 20 until he can have a crack at the championships, because he showed some terrific signs last year, and in the WAFL so far this season. Plenty of guys pushing up in the West Australian side, and will have an important distribution role over the next month.

#19 Cooper Stephens

Geelong Falcons/Vic Country | Inside Midfielder
17/01/2001 | 188cm | 83kg

The Geelong Falcons midfielder unfortunately fractured his fibula in in Round 3 and will miss a few months, hoping to return in time for a big second half of the year. Stephens is a huge loss for Vic Country as Falcons Talent Manager Mick Turner said he would not take part in the National Under 18 Championships next month.  Stephens is a neat user of the ball, recording 65 per cent by foot, and in the two games before his injury, Stephens averaged 26 disposals, 3.5 marks, 4.0 clearances and ran at more than 60 per cent contested possessions. The question mark will be how he returns from his injury, but with the injury not being season-ending, expect him to come back and be a crucial player in the final couple of months for the Falcons.

May Ranking: #18

Last month: Has been injured, but was named vice-captain of Vic Country despite not being able to play in the national championships. Might slide over the next month, but hopefully will remind recruiters of his talent later in the year.

#20 Luke Jackson

East Fremantle/Western Australia | Ruck
29/09/2001 | 197cm | 93kg

The athletic West Australian ruck picked Australian Rules over basketball last year despite donning the green and gold on the court. Jackson plays like an extra midfielder when moving around the ground and has been plying his trade at Colts level in the WAFL given the strength of ruck stocks at East Fremantle. Jackson looms as a potential first round pick, even though rucks are traditionally taken later. He would be viewed as a long-term prospect, and certainly if his two National Under 18 Championships games from 2018 are anything to go by, he has plenty of talent at his disposal. Clubs will like the fact he is not out of the contest once the ball hits ground level, and was solid against Casey Demons’ bigger-bodied rucks on the MCG. The standout ruck in the 2019 draft crop in a crop that does not have as many top-end talls as last year.

May Ranking: #19

Last month: Like many of his highly-touted East Fremantle teammates, has not played over the past month at WAFL level, but was dominent in his last match a month ago with 17 disposals, 28 hitouts, five marks and two goals proving quite a handful. All eyes will be on Jackson when he takes on fellow talented ruck Nick Bryan at the championships.

#21 Nick Bryan

Oakleigh Chargers/Vic Metro | Ruck
22/10/2001 | 202cm | 87kg

The super athletic ruck has come on in leaps and bounds this year, and posts a 2.91-second 20m sprint and 78cm running vertical leap, making him an elite speedster, let alone for his size. He has not spent as much time in the elite system with the AFL Academy as others, and still needs to keep building his tank, but Bryan has a huge upside, which is what will attract recruiters to him. He is also capable of going forward and impacting the scoreboard when required, and was plucked out to play in the AFL Academy game against Casey Demons, taking on mature-aged rucks and holding his own. At 202cm, he is the right size for a ruck, and could well be the first ruck chosen this year, depending on how he and Luke Jackson go at the national championships.

May Ranking: N/A

Last month: Has been playing school football for St Kevin’s since the APS competition started, and then had went out and competed for Vic Metro at the MCG on Saturday. He had his colours lowered by a red-hot Charlie Comben on the day, but Bryan still showed enough to suggest he will be vital in the upcoming championships. He will have a terrific duel against Luke Jackson next round, and will be keen to put in a strong effort against the other standout ruck in the draft crop.

#22 Darcy Cassar

Western Jets/Vic Metro | General Utility
31/07/2001 | 183cm | 79kg

As a bottom-ager last year, Cassar thrived as a half-forward/wing who would move the ball in transition and show power in his running to be able to impact for his side going inside 50. He is capable of hitting the scoreboard while playing in the forward half, but as he has shown so far in season 2019, he is just as adaptable in defence. Cassar has spent the season in the backline for the Western Jets, averaging a massive 28.2 disposals, 6.8 marks and 6.9 rebounds per game. He has added that element to his game, and expect him to be a versatile player at the national championships for Vic Metro, playing up whichever end is required of him, while also being able to play in the midfield.

May Ranking: N/A

Last month: Played in attack for Metro on the weekend in their loss to Vic Country. He set up the opening goal to teammate Josh Honey, then kicked one of his own in the first term. Was quieter from then on, but still showed glimpses and his season form this year has been nothing short of exceptional..

#23 Trent Rivers

East Fremantle/Western Australia | Inside Midfielder
30/07/2001 | 189cm | 84kg

It is a good year for East Fremantle, with prospects basically growing on trees, and Rivers is another touted top 30 prospect along with Jeremy Sharp and Luke Jackson. Rivers is a natural-born leader who thrives on the contest and is as consistent as they come, racking up more than 20 disposals in most outings. He loves to tackle and put his body on the line, and is a crucial key to the inside midfield of Western Australia at the national championships. Unlike a lot of other top-end midfielders this year, Rivers has the size on him, standing at 189cm and 84kg, and readymade for senior football.

May Ranking: N/A

Last month: Was named in Western Australia’s leadership group last week and is perparing to tackle Vic Metro at home next weekend. Was close to making the top 20 last month and is thereabouts this month with the extension to 25.

#24 Kysaiah Pickett

WWT Eagles/South Australia | Small Forward
02/06/2001 | 170cm | 68kg

Arguably the most naturally gifted player in the draft, the nephew of Port Adelaide and North Melbourne premiership player Byron, is small in stature but big on X-factor and his ability to do the impossible. He is clean at ground level, has high-level goal sense, and despite being so lightly built, was able to force his way into the Woodville-West Torrens League side courtesy of a massive six-goal game against North Adelaide in the first round of the SANFL Reserves competition. Adds an extra dimension to the South Australian forward line and will be one that could light up the big stage over the next month.

May Ranking: N/A

Last month: Pickett has managed two League games for the Eagles, booting a goal on debut against Sturt, before seeing what it was like playing on AFL-listed players in the Eagles’ loss to Adelaide.

#25 Fraser Phillips

Gippsland Power | General Forward
15/05/2001 | 186cm | 71kg

A lightly built medium forward, Phillips has some really exciting traits that he has begun to show more often than not as he builds his consistency. He started the season slowly, but has built into his role at Gippsland Power, and can launch goals from just about anywhere inside 50. He is clean at ground level, has a nice turn of foot and great goal sense, as well as applying defensive pressure whenever he gets a chance. A good size who will develop as he adds more bulk to his frame to compete more one-on-one against stronger defenders.

May Ranking: N/A

Last month: Coming into the national championships, Phillips averaged 13.3 disposals and 2.0 goals at NAB League Boys level, but his past two games were particularly eye-catching with 24 disposals, five marks and two goals against GWV Rebels, following on from a deeper forward role with four majors against Calder Cannons. Building form nicely, he had a quieter game on the weekend for Vic Country, but while he did not win a heap of the ball, never stopped putting in effort – laying six tackles and winning a crucial late hardball get to set up a goal.

Names to watch:

 

Charlie Dean (Sandringham Dragons/Vic Metro)

The key position forward made a promising start to his year at the Dragons, and could have been a potential leading goalkicker this season had it not been for APS football commitments with Wesley College. Works hard up the ground.

Ned Cahill (Dandenong Stingrays/Vic Country)

Had a big role in the second half for the Country side in the win over Vic Metro, and just has great game sense and nous around goals.

Finn Maginness (Sandringham Dragons/Vic Metro)

The underrated midfielder just keeps on going strong and was solid in Metro’s loss to Vic Country. A player to keep tabs on as the season develops.

Cody Weightman (Dandenong Stingrays/Vic Country)

Has some really nice traits with a penetrating kick and ability to impact forward of centre. Could easily be considered top 25.

Will Day (West Adelaide/South Adelaide)

Talented half-back returning from a hamstring injury to play school footy with Sacred Heart. Able to use both sides of his body well.

Liam Henry (Claremont/Western Australia)

Had a good start to the season in Western Australia and is a member of Fremantle’s Next Generation Academy (NGA).

Scouting notes: AFLU18s – Vic Metro vs. Vic Country

A Victorian derby opened the 2019 Under 18 National Championships, with the Country side coming away with an upset 9.10 (64) to 7.9 (51) win over their Metro counterparts. We had five scouts cast eyes over all 46 players who graced the hallowed MCG turf, and here are their opinion-based notes on how each prospect fared.

Vic Country:

#1-10 by Craig Byrnes
#12-32 by Peter Williams
#34-40 by Ed Pascoe

#1 Ned Cahill

The nifty and clever Stingray’s small forward was arguably one of the most influential players on the ground, but did so with less fanfare than the likes of Young, Ash and Serong. He showcased the disciplined Vic Country standards early with a big tackle in the centre to earn a free kick and an unselfish goal assist to Smith in the first term to get things started. While he didn’t utilise two good chances to hit targets inside 50 when in space during the second term, he barely made another error for the rest of the day as his elite smarts and decision making took control. It was highlighted by two brilliantly read crumbs that he finished off superbly with dual snaps off his left in the second half. He also got the ball to Flanders inside 50 in the final term to end with a match high four score assists and two goals from his 16 disposals.

#2 Caleb Serong

The Vic Country co-captain set the early intensity level for his teammates with physical, two way football from the midfield in the first term. He made life as difficult as possible for the Vic Metro big names, earning a holding the ball free on Rowell in the opening stages of the match. He refused to give in until the ball was out of his area, highlighted by a multiple tackle effort in the second quarter on the wing that eventually won Country the ball back. He also made them accountable, winning first possession at the stoppages and running to dangerous ball winning positions. Serong’s trademark cleanliness stood out as usual, his hands sharp and precise in tight situations. While he uncharacteristically let some kicks hang longer than hoped, his ball use in general was very good. One of the best performers in the winner’s corner, finishing with 22 disposals, five clearances and seven tackles.

#3 Cody Weightman

The exciting small forward took time to get into the game with a quiet first half, but came to life in the third term to display his quality AFL attributes. His confidence got a boost when flying for a mark at half back and earning a free kick, which triggered a flurry of touches on the lead or in space forward of centre. He worked hard to get in offensive positions, but unfortunately let himself down with ball in hand, operating at only 30% by foot including some turnovers in dangerous rebounding positions. He produced some brilliance in between though, highlighted by an excellent contested mark on the lead in the third term, before turning and hitting Josh Smith inside 50. This guy has serious ability, looking forward to seeing what he can produce throughout the competition.

#4 Sam Flanders

It did not take long to recognise that Leigh Brown’s focus was about pressure and Sam Flanders made that intention clear from the start. The superb chase down of Ryan Sturgess in the first quarter that resulted in a goal made the belief real and potentially cemented the buy in from every player if it wasn’t already. His pressure at the contest was outstanding, finishing with a game high nine tackles, but he also continued his rich reign of ball winning form at Gippsland with 21 disposals. He had his usual stints forward, kicking a vital fourth quarter set shot goal to keep a comfortable margin. Can still tidy his kicking up, but it was an important contribution by the talented forward/mid.

#6 Riley Baldi

Baldi has been in outstanding since returning to the Gippsland fold from injury, collecting large disposal tallies at will with his nous at the stoppages. For Country he was part of later midfield rotations and still won plenty of footy, despite not producing his usually prolific contested and clearance numbers. He found most of his possessions on the outside by receiving on the outskirts of contests and running to space. Despite a poor handball turnover in the first quarter, he typically finished with composure as proven with a classy kick inside 50 to Smith shortly after. It was a solid outing for Baldi, ending with 19 possessions, of which 15 were uncontested.

#7 Mitch Martin

Playing a high percentage of minutes forward, Martin had a modest first half despite producing a nice moment in the second quarter where he weaved through traffic and placed a quick kick inside 50 to advantage. But it was in the third term when he became truly relevant, starting with a slick handball over his head to a teammate. From there, the ball began to follow him and he took advantage with a couple of threatening inside 50s. He almost kicked a ridiculous set shot goal from the corner of the boundary and 50 metre arc, but was touched on the line. He has some tricks and can sell some attractive candy. Martin got out the back for a goal in the final term to complete a creative second half.

#8 Thomson Dow

You could make a very strong case that Thomson Dow was the best player on the ground up to half-time. To that point he had collected 15 disposals, doing heavy work inside at the stoppages and finding space on the outside. He was particularly slick by hand, raising his arms and releasing with impressive vision. We didn’t see nearly as much of him in the third and fourth terms, managed only three disposals after the main break. Despite the quieter second half, what we did see is a player who is currently too far down many draft boards. The brother of Carlton’s Paddy can definitely play.

#10 Harrison Pepper

The Hawthorn NGA prospect took time to get into the contest from the wing, but got busy in the second quarter. He won a couple of excellent one on one ground balls, using his frame to advantage and got the ball forward on each occasion. His kicking and decision making was tentative at times, especially during the third term when he took a mark 30 metres out from goal and floated a short pass to the disadvantage of a teammate 15-20 metres away. He has worked extremely hard on his running capacity over the last 12 months or so and that has resulted in excellent on-field improvement. He will be better for the run at the standard.

#12 Lachlan Ash

One of the better Country players on the day, overcoming an early turnover to hit 13 of his remaining 14 kicks through some terrific vision. Not only was he able to hit targets all over the ground, but he took the game on and would have been one of the highest metres gained players. Ash showed poise and composure coming out of defence and pushing up the ground, particularly stepping up in the last quarter with the game on the line and Metro pushing hard. He was able to set up goal opportunities to Josh Smith and Ned Cahill, and opened up the game with terrific in-board kicks.

#13 Jay Rantall

Was one of the more consistent Country midfielders and worked hard through the inside. He is able to get his hands free from would-be tacklers, and started to get moving more in the middle of the game. He laid some important tackles and was able to get quick-fire handballs out to teammates such as Riley Baldi in the first term with a nice handball, and then snap round his body for a goal assist to Charlie Comben. He then set up a second goal late in the game to Rebels’ teammate Mitch Martin. Had a chance himself in the third quarter after pushing hard to the forward pocket but was thrown off it. An impressive game once again.

#15 Ryan Sparkes

Gave a four quarter effort and was constantly on the move. His kicking in the first term was a little shaky, but once he worked into the game he had a bigger impact on the game. His final quarter saw him remarkably win a one-on-one contest against the much stronger and taller Noah Anderson with good body position, and won his fair share of the ball in the second half when Country needed players to stand up.

#16 Brodie Kemp

Was an intercept machine who took the game on out of defence and often was spotted bursting out from half-back and down the middle. He won a free kick early against Charlie Dean, and saved a number of goals, including one in the first term, rushing it through. His kicking was a worry at times, making a number of errors when he was running off half-back. His strengths were his overhead marking and his one-on-one work, marking against the much taller Nick Bryan through good positioning. A courageous grab against Jack Mahony where both players committed was another highlight in the final term.

#17 Hayden Young

The best on ground running defender was absolutely elite in his ball use with his kicking out of defence, penetrating long kicks and intercept marking a delight. Young was a real headache for the Metro side, getting to the point where he was spinning out of trouble and hitting up targets in the middle of the ground with his non-preferred right foot. He rarely made errors with his disposal and apart from a clumsy high free kick to Dylan Williams, had a near perfect game. Just so dominant and a key to Country’s chances this year.

#18 Brady Rowles

Not a huge disposal winner, with just the nine touches for the game, but has some nice eye-catching moments. He is able to dispose of the ball under pressure, whilst applying defensive pressure himself to opposition players. He has great hands in tight which were on show when he fed the handball out to Jay Rantall to set up a goal from Charlie Comben in the first term.

#19 Fraser Phillips

Not overly impactful offensively, but defensively he was very good. His tackling pressure locked up a number of balls throughout the game, and he was able to get his hands free when tackles late in the game. He missed a shot on goal tight in the pocket on the run in the second term, but his big highlight was a massive hardball get in the final term, using hands to give it to Lachlan Ash in the middle and set up a scoring opportunity.

#20 Elijah Hollands

So exciting and not only does he have the offensive capabilities, but works hard defensively as well, laying a number of huge tackles in the forward half. Hollands has lightning hands in congestion and is able to win the hardball and quickly dish off to a teammate before being dispossessed. He had a huge highlight in the second term with an unbelievable goal out of nothing from a forward stoppage, roving Charlie Comben and booting the goal from just inside 50 close to the boundary line.

#24 Brock Smith

A quiet game from the Gippsland Power game, but won a free kick one-on-one against Dylan Williams in the third term, and was composed with ball in hand, mostly handballing to teammates to run out in space.

#26 Jesse Clark

A statless first term, but Clark really work into the game after quarter time, taking a number of good marks and rebounding out of the defensive half. He showed a good second effort when taking a mark, was smothered and then won it back. He positioned himself well in front of his opponents when one-on-one.

#32 Ben Worme

Just the three touches from Worme in a quiet game. He did rush a behind late in the game when under pressure which was clever.

#34 Bigoa Nyoun

Nyoun played a solid game rotating in the ruck, he did well to get involved around the ground taking multiple marks and often choosing to hand off to a running teammate. There was a good bit of play in the first quarter despite not taking the mark he would recover well to take the ball cleanly and give off a handball, his last half was strongest with a nice pass inside 50 and a nice intercept mark and quick pass inside 50. A very good contributor who competed well in the ruck and did some good things around the ground.

#36 Sam De Koning

De Koning was a strong interceptor in defence taking four nice intercept marks with one coming in the first quarter deep in defence and another really strong mark late in the game, De Koning was very clean throughout the game never fumbling and using the ball well by hand especially in one bit if play in the second quarter where he would pick out a long 15 metre handball under pressure and it was a feat in itself to even find the option from where he was at. De Koning was the standout tall defender for Country with his good marking and ball use.

#39 Josh Smith

Smith was the most dangerous forward early on kicking two first quarter goals; one from an uncontested mark 10 metres out and a holding free kick deep in the pocket where he would slot a nice goal, he could have kicked three goals after a nice lead up mark but would miss the set shot. His third goal would be his best taking the ball in mid air right on the line and kicking a great goal quickly dropping the ball on his boot. He did not hit the scoreboard in the second half but he took a great contested mark against Ryan Sturgess but would miss the set shot, he also rotated in the ruck at times and competed well taking a nice intercept mark in defence.

#40 Charlie Comben

Comben had a hard task rucking against the in form ruck this year in Nick Bryan, but Comben not only competed well all day, but really showed good aggression and enthusiasm throughout the match to win the battle. He had a great bit of play in the first quarter taking a strong mark deep in the forwardline and then quickly playing on and kicking a goal. Comben worked even harder in the second quarter taking a strong intercept mark and quickly playing on with a kick inboard and he did well late in the game with a good strong tackle inside 50 winning a free kick but missing the set shot on the siren. A high energy game from Comben who showed of his athletic attributes and aggression around the ground.

 

Vic Metro:

#1-19 by Michael Alvaro
#20-26 by Scott Dougan
#29-40 by Ed Pascoe

#1 Jack Mahony

It was workman-like display from Mahony, who played a key role in the heavy Metro midfield/forward rotation. Starting inside 50, Mahony looked most effective when working up the ground – using his admirable work rate to create distance from his opponent and find the ball in space. He is clean at ground level, and showed as much with a few nice gathers early on and clean clearances later, while his kicking also looked more on point in the first half. The Sandringham gun’s leadership was also on display with audible talk around traffic, and he put his body on the line in a bone-crunching contest going back with the flight in the third term. Supplied Dragons teammate Finn Maginness with a goal in the final quarter to cap off a solid 15-disposal day.

#5 Trent Bianco

While the Oakleigh leader did not always look his usual damaging self, Bianco still had some nice moments. Was very quiet in the opening term and struggled to get any kind of running game going early off half-back, which in all fairness had a lot to do with Country’s manic pressure. Bianco was unlucky not to find more of the ball as he positioned well when breaking from stoppages and ran to the right places to receive on the outside, but was hardly found. Showed off his typical kicking penetration with a nice ball going inside 50 and flicked out some nice deft handballs in the clinches to show his class in the second and third terms. Bianco seemed to be most effective with his overlap runs late on, and put in a good push to get Metro back in the game with efficient use across defensive 50.

#8 Adam Carafa

Carafa managed to get a run in the stacked Metro midfield, but spent most of his time at half forward having already proven his ability to compete at either end. By no means had a massive disposal output (13), but the Northern midfielder showcased his clean set of hands at ground level when called upon and was all class in traffic. Had about four attempts on goal throughout the match – with two snaps and a set shot falling short, while another went out on the full – so could have otherwise had a greater influence. Ended up spending some time off half back in the second half, and looks to be one who will be called upon in multiple roles throughout the carnival.

#11 Matt Rowell

The list of superlatives to describe Rowell is running thin at this point on the back of yet another dominant outing. While his midfield partnership with close mate Noah Anderson could not quite drag Metro over the line, the two were simply outstanding. Rowell’s balanced game was on show as the Chargers gun went about pressuring his opposition without the ball, while also breaking away from traffic with it. Rowell did not find the goals while resting forward, but he still managed to snare a major from the goalsquare in the third term after creating forward movement from an inside 50 stoppage. He also sparked the move for Finn Maginness’ goal with a burst away from congestion on defensive wing – a play which was largely symbolic of his whole performance. A somewhat underrated aspect of Rowell’s game is his strong overhead marking, but he again showed his ability to prize the ball in the air with some courageous attempts. The comparisons to Joel Selwood will likely continue to roll on too, with pictures of Rowell bloodied up on the bench shown on the big screen. A big-time performer – 28 disposals, eight marks, five tackles, three clearances, three inside 50s, and one goal.

#13 Daniel Mott

Mott started brightly and looked like taking the chance he was afforded at the centre bounces to full effect. The classy Calder ball-user showed off a good bit of vision to find Jack Mahony back through the corridor early on, and was in the thick of the action. While Mott’s output slowed as the game progressed, he would catch the eye with glimpses of his usual self – side-stepping well in the second term, booting well inside 50 from a clearance to find Josh Worrell, and flicking out a deft handball to Trent Bianco amid oncoming traffic. Was another to rest forward but looks to be an effective point of difference to Metro’s largely inside midfield.

#15 Louis Butler

Butler made the half-back flank his own, and was the designated Metro kicker out of defence – both with kick-ins and further afield. Usually a penetrating and reliable kick, Butler was uncharacteristically let down by that area of his game on occasion with four noticeable clangers across the day. Much like in the case of Trent Bianco, Butler also struggled at times to generate effective run in the face of Country’s pressure, but you could not fault his effort as he racked up 24 disposals and seven rebound 50s. Showed positive signs early with his composure on the last line of defence, and he took a nice pair of intercept marks. Butler also had a purple patch in the final term as he delivered well through the corridor on two occasions with kicks more typical of his class, and he was one to take the game on when his side needed it. Had a humorous moment in the third term where he looked to have been tripped up by the goal umpire, stiff.

#16 Darcy Cassar

Cassar diverted back to the role which helped him come to the fore in his NAB League debut as a 16-year-old – making a menace of himself at half-forward. The Keilor product made a terrific start, finding Western teammate Josh Honey with a neat kick inside 50 to help Metro put the first goal on the board. Donning the #16 of Jets graduate Cam Rayner, Cassar sharked a smart read off hands and finished well on they dribble in an effort the now-Brisbane gun would be proud of. Cassar also showed a zippy first five steps through traffic, and was clean in gathering tricky balls at ground level. Was eventually moved to the defensive position he has become used to for Western this season, but had an indifferent start when he lost direct opponent Sam Flanders and could only watch as the Country star converted a crucial goal. Was otherwise composed in the back half and looked most effective when given space. Would love to see more of him up forward.

#18 Lachie Potter

It was a pretty typical Lachie Potter game, with the speedy Northern half-back looking to cause headaches with damaging forward run. Is hardly a massive accumulator, with the 15-disposal mark he hit usually a marker for one of his better games. Potter’s impact is not calculated by pure numbers though, and he caught the eye with repeated take-ons and some impressive overhead marks which added to his game. Was matched up as the deepest defender as Country looked to thwart his influence, but Potter still found a way to get on his mazey runs. Is often let down by his end product though – especially at full speed – but tended to handball more and was more effective as a result. Had an unfortunate fumble inside defensive 50 when a bounce didn’t quite come back to him, and is still ironing out those mistakes in his game.

#19 Josh Honey

Honey looked like returning to his best form when he converted the first goal of the game from a set shot, but tended to fade out the game after that point. Still showed some glimpses of his class with a couple of nice one-on-one wins, and an eye-catching spin out of trouble with two Country opponents close-by. Led well up the ground from half-forward and has shown he has plenty of upside.

#20 Connor Downie

Downie played predominately on the wing and did his best to provide some run and carry. He did not win much of the ball but when he did, he was able to put his penetrating left foot to good use. Downie finished with nine disposals and four marks. Still a bottom-ager which is rare for a Metro side, Downie will be better for the experience.

#21 Hugo Ralphsmith

Ralphsmith played through the midfield and caught the eye in the first quarter when he won an important one-on-one contest by bringing the ball to ground and winning possession. He would then drive the ball inside 50 to the advantage of his teammates. His footy smarts were also on display in the second quarter when he decided it would be best to ‘soccer kick’ a ground ball to teammate Jack Mahony, which was effective.

#22 Miles Bergman

Bergman won a few touches early and laid a couple of good tackles. One of his best passages of play came in the second term when he took a really good contested grab against two others that somehow, wasn’t paid by the field umpire. Bergman had a very promising second half, winning a lot of the ball and booting a brilliant snap-goal in the final seconds of the match. He had a very good all-around game and did all the little things extremely well. Bergman had 16 disposals, four marks, and three tackles.

#23 Dylan Williams

Williams was quiet early but slowly worked his way into the game in the second quarter. He had two shots on goal within minutes, but both failed to register a score. Williams went off half-way through the term after coping a big knock and looked very sore. He would return shortly after, but he was still clearly struggling. He would spend a lot of the time on the bench in the second half. Williams has the potential to turn games instantly, and that’s what makes him such a dangerous player, especially in the forward half.

#24 Noah Anderson

The potential number one pick was instantly involved, laying the first tackle of the game and would then win the first clearance. His hands in tight were superb. Anderson won 14 disposals in the first half and was prolific around stoppages. In the second term, he would win a centre clearance with one of his arms being held, showcasing his strength in the contest and fantastic hand-eye coordination. Anderson’s defensive work was also fantastic, laying eight tackles for the match. His work-rate and competitiveness were why he was one of the standout performers for Metro.

#25 Finn Maginness

Maginness was one of his teams’ best midfielders, winning 15 possessions and five clearances on the day. His impact defensively in the first half was eye-catching, and he finished with a game-high nine tackles. He was exceptionally clean at ground level and his foot skills were noticeable. Maginness demonstrated composure with ball in hand and his vision was impressive, with the classy midfielder finding a teammate out of the corner of his eye in the third term. He would hit the scoreboard late in the fourth term when he ran into an open goal after running hard into space.

#26 Ryan Sturgess

Sturgess had his work cut out for him, along with a lot of the Metro’s defenders on the day. His marking ability and strong hands definitely stood out, taking five marks. His ball use by foot was sometimes questionable, but he never stopped trying and battled on throughout the match. Sturgess read the play well and his defensive spoiling was encouraging.

#29 Fischer McAsey

McAsey was a wall in defence all day taking intercept marks at will and showing good composure and skill with the ball coming from defence. He would kick a goal in the third quarter after taking a strong intercept mark on the wing and winning a 50 metre penalty, he showed a good set shot routine showing he could also make a good forward especially with his marking ability. He was near unstoppable in the last quarter taking three strong intercept marks and moving the ball on quickly usually favouring a switch kick. McAsey is making an early case as the best key defender in the 2019 draft.

#30 Harrison Jones

Jones played forward and kicked his only goal in the first quarter from a lead up mark showing a good set shot routine, Jones lead up well as a tall target all day despite being very light he still worked hard to be a target. He did some really nice things in the last quarter showing unselfishness to block for teammate Maginess to run into open goal and continuing to take lead up marks and picking the ball up nice at ground level showing his athleticism.

#31 Josh Worrell

Worrell started well taking a good intercept mark in the first quarter and quickly playing on with a long kick, his hands overhead and ground level were a feature and he had a nice spin out of trouble showing his mobility. He was sore after a collision in the 3rd quarter but would go forward in the last quarter and take a nice strong mark on the lead although missing the long shot at goal, he would later take more nice marks showing his versatility in playing at either end.

#34 Charlie Dean

Dean had a tough day at the office playing well but not getting the reward, Dean looked composed and clean early showing good composure tight on the boundary in the first quarter to release a handball and had a fantastic pick up and then good handball. Dean had two chances to hit the scoreboard in the 3rd quarter taking a strong contested mark against De Koning but would miss the set shot and later on would show good composure under pressure but just miss the goal in general play. Dean was involved in the last quarter laying a good smother and taking a lead up mark and delivering a beautiful low pass inside 50 to teammate Ralphsmith who would kick the final goal of the game.

#37 Andrew Courtney

Courtney was the ruck rotation from the bench and he competed well when he got the chance winning a few nice hitouts. Courtney didn’t get a lot of the ball but worked hard to get forward of centre a few times to get involved and link up with teammates.

#38 Brodie Newman

Newman despite a shaky start really worked into the game to be on of Metro’s better players playing in defence, had a poor contest early not manning the mark well enough for Comben to run into open goal but his work in defence for the next 3 quarters was outstanding intercepting at will at times especially his second quarter where he was heavily involved defending and attacking equally well. Had a good bit of play in the third quarter laying a good spoil on Josh Smith and then would gather the ball and show good composure under pressure, he had another good play in the last quarter going for a dash and showing his good speed for his size.

#40 Nick Bryan

Bryan did not have an absolute standout game but he was still able to show his talent and why he is highly regarded as a ruckman in this years draft. Bryan showed good agility, smarts and ball use with ball in hand which was certainly above average for a ruckman and his best bit of play came in the third quarter laying a good spoil then receiving a handball and handballing well himself and then getting the ball back again to lower his eyes with a lovely kick to Oakleigh teammate Matt Rowell, it was a great chain that showed of his ball use and smarts. His tap work was also good timing his jumps well and often competing well.