Tag: tasmania devils

Tasmanian Player of the AFL Draft Era: Vote for yours on our Instagram channel

TASMANIA is up next in our Player of the AFL Era series which will be run through our Instagram channel starting at 12.30pm today. The Swan Districts All-Star voting was completed yesterday with Nic Naitanui and Alex Rance announced as dual winners and co-captains of the Swans’ All-Star side.

Tasmania has had development teams on and off over the years, from the Mariners to the Devils, as well as a few players who have gone on to be drafted outside of the Apple Isle at other clubs. For the purpose of this, we have included the likes of Ben Brown who was drafted out of the VFL, but hailed from Tasmania, as well as those like Matthew Richardson who came from the Tasmanian State League (TSL) rather than a development program. The top few seeds in the draw include Richmond’s Jack Riewoldt and former Melbourne star, Brad Green.

The voting will run over the next four days starting today, with the winner to be decided by Wednesday night (unless extra time and the full 24 hours is needed in the final vote). The next club involved in the voting process is West Adelaide Bloods starting on Thursday. All eligible players were selected thanks to the Draft Guru site.

Classic Contests: Short stands tall as Northern takes out Tasmania

IF you are missing footy like we are, then let us somewhat salvage that with a look back in our series of Classic Contests. In today’s contest we look at one of the would-have-been Round 18 clashes in the NAB League this year between the Northern Knights and Tasmania Devils. In this edition we wind back the clock to 2014, before Tasmania returned as a full-time team, and relive when the two sides clashed at Preston City Oval.

2014 TAC Cup, Round 10
Saturday June 14, 11:00am
Preston City Oval

NORTHERN KNIGHTS 4.1 | 8.7 | 10.11 | 13.14 (92)
TASMANIA 2.4 | 4.7 | 7.9 | 7.12 (54)

GOALS:

Northern: B. Jordan 3, W. Murphy 2, L. Hunt 2, J. Gresham, J. El Moussalli, K. Malone, K. Declase, B. Fiorini, S. Switkowski.
Tasmania:
K. Pitchford 2, B. Sharman, P. Bellchambers, M. Rainbird, A. Dickenson, J. Watts.

BEST:

Northern: J. Short, W. Murphy, J. Gresham, S. Switkowski, B. Jordan, A. Di Paolo
Tasmania:
A. Dickenson, C. Hislop, L. Reynolds, T. Jones, P. Bellchambers, J. Johnson

Draftees in action:

Northern: Jayden Short, Brayden Fiorini, Jade Gresham, Sam Switkowski, Tyrone Leonardis
Tasmania: Josh McGuinness, Josh Watts, Ryan Gardner, Jay Lockhart

Tasmania’s part-time TAC Cup duties in 2014 pitted them against the Northern Knights for a clash at Preston City Oval in mid-June. Formerly the Mariners and not yet the Devils, the Tasmanians donned the Map for their four-game stint in the Victorian competition. A loss to Dandenong in Round 8 had them sitting 0-1, while Northern were out to snap a four-game losing run and improve on its 2-7 record.

Timing would see the Knights go in without some key personnel, with the likes of Jason Castagna and Kyle Langford absent along with key talls Reece McKenzie and Ivan Soldo. It meant Jayden Short was left to lead a solid core of top-agers and promising bottom-age fleet for the Knights on home turf. Tasmania was able to field some promising talent of its own, most notably in the form of 2014 draftees Josh McGuinness and Josh Watts, as well as future AFL products Ryan Gardner and Jay Lockhart.

Despite managing one less scoring shot in the opening term, Northern showed its knowledge of the home conditions to make the most of its chances. 4.1 to Tasmania’s 2.4 gave the Knights a handy buffer, which was only extended to an even four-goal margin at half-time as they piled on a further four majors in term two.

While the visitors got the better of the third term with three goals to Northern’s two, it seemed they had little left in the tank. The Knights would take advantage of the scoring end to kick away to victory, keeping Tasmania goalless in the final period while prettying up the final margin to come out 38-point winners at 13.14 (92) to 7.12 (54).

In what was the four-quarter effort the Knights were after all season, Short was named best afield for his 28 disposals, five marks, and six tackles. Jade Gresham (21 disposals, seven tackles, one goal) and Sam Switkowski (17 disposals, five tackles, one goal) were also named among Northern’s best, and Bailey Jordan booted three goals. Ashton Dickenson was adjudged Tasmania’s most valuable player for his 14 disposals and four marks, follwed by Caleb Hislop (31 disposals).

The Knights would go on to add just three more wins to their tally in the back-end of the season, landing in 10th spot with six wins and 11 losses. Tasmania’s four-game cameo ended with a 1-3 record, but it was capped off in style with a win over North Ballarat in Round 16.

Classic Contests: Cassar, Honey star as Jets soar past the Devils

IF you are missing footy like we are, then let us somewhat salvage that with a look back our series of Classic Contests. In today’s contest we look at one of the would-have-been Round 17 clashes in the NAB League this year between the Western Jets and Tasmania Devils. In this edition, we wind the clock back just one year to Round 5 of 2019, when the Jets soared to a comfortable win away from home.

2019 NAB League, Round 5
Sunday April 28, 11:45am
UTAS Stadium

TASMANIA DEVILS 1.4 | 1.6 | 2.7 | 3.8 (26)
WESTERN JETS 2.0 | 4.3 | 7.8 | 10.13 (73)

GOALS:

Tasmania: T. Penwright, L. Gadomski, I. Chugg.
Western:
A. Manton 3, J. Honey 2, E. Ford 2, A. Clarke, C. White, J. Horo.

BEST:

Tasmania: O. Burrows-Cheng, P. Walker, M. McGuinness, B. Gordon, L. Viney, O. Shaw
Western: 
D. Cassar, K. Borg, J. Kellett, J. Horo, W. Kennedy, L. Rocci

Draftees in action:

Tasmania: Matthew McGuinness
Western:
 Josh Honey

Two sides with a couple of wins already under their belts went head-to-head early in last year’s NAB League campaign, with Tasmania hosting the Western Jets at UTAS Stadium in Launceston. The Devils had made a positive start in their maiden full-time season, enjoying a bye in Round 1 and bouncing back from their Round 2 loss to take a 2-1 record heading into this clash. Western sat similarly poised at 2-2, having just secured a rebound victory over the Northern Territory a week earlier.

While the two regions would lay claim to a pair of draftees each come the end of the year, only one would take the field on either side; with North Melbourne rookie Matt McGuinness lining up for the home side, while Carlton recruit Josh Honey ran through midfield for Western. The Jets were missing Emerson Jeka, with Tasmania also down a tall target as Jackson Callow came out of the side. Fellow Academy-based bottom-agers Oliver Davis and Sam Collins were also absent alongside Mitch O’Neill in a blow to the Devils’ chances.

The losses seem to take toll early, as the Devils failed capitalise on their domination of the territory and possession. A 20-minute goalless patch ensued after debutant Isaac Chugg put through the game’s first goal, only for Western to hit back twice within the final five minutes of the opening term to hit the front. It seemed to sink the Devils a touch, as they went on to go goalless throughout the second stanza, while giving up another two goals and a 15-point deficit at half time – albeit in a low-scoring contest.

Lachlan Gadomski broke Tasmania’s hour-long goal drought with a major nine minutes into the third term, but it proved a feeble form of reply as Western continued to pile on the scoreboard pressure and extended the margin to 31 points at three quarter time. It was an unassailable gap, and the Jets only further ensured it would be a bridge too far as they kicked away to a nine-goal lead, only to settle for the final 47-point margin.

Darcy Cassar ran the show off half-back for Western, proving a key player in shifting the early momentum back into the Jets’ favour. He finished with 31 disposals, 13 marks, and eight rebound 50s, while Honey booted two goals from his 25 touches. Tasmanian pair Bailey Gordon and Patrick Walker matched that feat to be their sides’ leading ball winners. Archi Manton led the goalkicking stakes with three goals, followed by bottom-aged Eddie Ford and Honey on two. Oliver Burrows-Cheng and McGuinness were named among the Devils’ best.

Tasmania would go on to add just two wins to its record across the season, finishing in 12th spot at 4-11 and bowing out during Wildcard Round to Calder. The Jets earned a seventh-place finish, storming into finals where they upset Northern in the elimination stage, but had their run ended by Gippsland in the semi finals a week later.

Classic Contests: Devils take Falcons down to the wire

IF you are missing footy like we are, then let us somewhat salvage that with a look back our series of Classic Contests. In today’s contest we look at one of the would-have-been Round 16 clashes in the NAB League this year between the Tasmania Devils and Geelong Falcons. In this edition, we wind the clock back almost a year to August 2019, when the two sides produced a thriller on the Apple Isle.

2019 NAB League, Round 16
Saturday August 3, 11:30am
North Hobart Oval

TASMANIA DEVILS 2.4 | 2.5 | 4.11 | 6.13 (49)
GEELONG FALCONS 3.1 | 5.4 | 5.6 | 8.8 (56)

GOALS:

Tasmania: J. Lane 2, J. Rand, P. Walker, J. Callow, J. Menzie.
Geelong:
C. Sprague 3, M. Annandale 2, C. Seymour, J. Clark, J. Dahlhaus.

BEST:

Tasmania: O. Davis, J. Rand, S. Banks, O. Shaw, J. Lane
Geelong:
O. Henry, C. Sprague, C. Fleeton, J. Clark, N. Gribble, H. Whyte

Draftees in action:

Tasmania: Matt McGuinness 
Geelong: 
Nil

The NAB League’s bottom two full-time sides – Tasmania and Geelong – went to battle in Round 16 last year, looking to restore some pride before the regular season drew to a close. Both were on significant losing streaks, with the Devils slumping to 4-10 on the back of six-straight losses, only to be trumped in that department by the young Falcons, who had lost in eight consecutive outings to sit at 1-11-1 in the wooden spoon position.

While neither region produced, or fielded much in the way of eventual draftees in late-2019, the bottom-age talent was there for all to see. The likes of Oliver Henry and Cameron Fleeton headlined Geelong’s talented 2021-eligible fleet, while Tasmania’s academy guns included the likes of Oliver Davis and Jackson Callow, with recently crowned Under 16 Most Valuable Player (MVP) Sam Banks also slotting into the line-up at North Hobart Oval.

>>> MARQUEE MATCHUP: JACKSON CALLOW VS. CAMERON FLEETON

Keen to make their trip across Bass Strait a fruitful one, Geelong clawed its way back after conceding the first two goals of the game to earn a five-point quarter time lead. In impressive form, the Falcons extended the buffer to 17 points at the main break on the back of two unanswered goals, taking full advantage of the slightly advantageous scoring end.

It took a string of four behinds after half-time for the Devils to post their first major in over 45 minutes of play, with the home side threatening to break back at Geelong. But despite Jordan Lane slotting home a second major for the term, Tasmania could not quite take full toll on the scoreboard, still trailing by a solitary point heading into the final period, despite keeping Geelong goalless.

The Falcons had made a bad habit of letting winnable games slip late, and another fadeaway loomed when Jack Rand put the Devils ahead with six minutes on the clock. With the scores tied up for a third time in the fourth quarter via Max Annandale‘s boot, it was left to Chris Seymour to put through the decisive goal and ensure Geelong would head back to Victoria with the four points.

Having swung into defence, Henry led all-comers with 24 disposals and 11 marks, partnering well with Fleeton (21 disposals) as skipper Jesse Clark (21 disposals, one goal) made the move further afield. Up forward, Charlie Sprague sunk three majors to play a big role, while Jay Dahlhaus also found the big sticks in his return from a long-term injury. Davis was best afield for Tasmania with a team-high 23 touches, followed closely by future North Melbourne rookie, Matt McGuinness. Lane was the lone Devil to boot multiple goals (two).

Tasmania would go on to finish just two points clear of Geelong with a 4-11 record, before going down narrowly to Calder in Wildcard Round. Mitch O’Neill joined McGuinness as the two Tasmanian products to find a home at AFL level in 2019. Geelong added to its second win in the ultimate round to finish 3-11-1, but were thumped by Sandringham in Wildcard Round to end a disappointing season. Co-captain Cooper Stephens was the sole Falcon to be drafted.

2020 TSL set to kick off tomorrow

THE opening round of the Tasmanian State League (TSL) will take place tomorrow with all three games to be played on a big opening day of action. The TSL Women’s competition will start a week later, but tomorrow will finally see the return of state league football to the Apple Isle. We take a look at some of the top young talents in action having also represented the Devils last season.

North Launceston won the flag last year and have a really strong side. From an AFL Draft perspective, contested marking key forward Jackson Callow is the one to look out for this season. The 194cm and 96kg Tasmanian is hard to match up on and averaged almost two goals a game for the Devils in the NAB League Boys competition last year. Ben Simpson is named on a wing and played seven games in the NAB League last year, while Oliver Sanders has earned a place on the bench.

The Bombers come up against last year’s wooden spooners in North Hobart Demons tomorrow. The Demons have some good young talent in the side, with AFL Academy duo, Sam Collins and Patrick Walker headlining the side. Along with them, the Devils also have sneaky mid-forward Jye Menzie, key position utility Jake Steele, and another Devil from last year in Will Peppin.

In the earlier game, Lauderdale face off against Clarence. In what was an all-Bombers grand final last year, Lauderdale will be keen to bounce back from missing out on their first flag since joining the league in 2009. Clarence finished sixth in 2019 and the Kangaroos are hoping to build on that this season. Nicholas Baker and Oscar Shaw are a couple of young talents named in defence for the Bombers, while Oliver Davis is the key young gun to watch for Clarence.

The inside midfielder has been named on the ball for the Roos and will no doubt not take a backwards step against older and more experienced opponents. He forms a young midfield core with fellow Devils talent from last year, Ethan Jackson also in the side, while Under 16s Tasmania Most Valuable Player (MVP) Sam Banks has been named on the interchange despite not being eligible to be drafted until next year. Another Devil in Sam Green was named at centre half-back, while Sam Lewis-Johnson came close to selection, named as an emergency.

In the other game, Glenorchy Magpies face off against Launceston Blues in a battle between two sides that finished inside the top four last season, well ahead of the bottom three. Ryan Banks-Smith is one who managed a couple of games with the Devils last season, while for the Blues, Jared Dakin is one who has had AFL interest in the past and is a real goer. Expect him to try and win a truckload of the ball through midfield and get it forward. Isaac Chugg has been named as an emergency for the clash, while forward, Will Harper has been named in the development league.

Marquee Matchups: Oliver Davis vs. Zane Trew

DESPITE remaining in the unknown of football’s temporary absence, Draft Central is set to ramp up its draft analysis with another new prospect-focussed series, Marquee Matchups. We take a look at some of the high-end head-to-head battles which look likely to take place as the class of 2020 eventually takes the field, comparing pairs of draft hopefuls to help preview who may come out on top.

The pair next under the microscope – Tasmania’s Oliver Davis and Swan Districts’ Zane Trew – make up two of the most promising inside midfielders in this year’s cohort. Both are incredibly tough and consistent, able to prise the ball out at stoppages and set their sides on the front foot from midfield. Ironically, they lined up on the same side during last year’s fixture between Australia’s Under 17s and New Zealand, both impressing through the engine room rotation. In 2020, they will inevitably meet during the proposed Under 18 National Championships, with Davis a leader among the Allies group, and Trew an important cog for Western Australia.

Davis enjoyed a stellar, largely uninterrupted run for his state in its inaugural full-time NAB League campaign, running out 13 times for an average of 22 disposals. He also broke through for a maiden Allies Under 18 appearance, picking up 10 touches against Vic Country on home turf. On the other hand, Trew suffered some bad luck on the injury front to be restricted to just three WAFL Colts games, but impressed in each. He also missed WA’s Under 18 campaign as a result, but is as professional as any current prospect and should be raring to go this year.

Without further ado, get up to speed with how the two match up in terms of their form to date, strengths, improvements, and what has already been said about their performances in our scouting notes.

PLAYER PAGES

Oliver Davis
Tasmania Devils/Allies

DOB: July 18, 2002

Height: 182cm
Weight: 75kg

Position: Inside Midfielder

Zane Trew
Swan Districts/Western Australia

DOB: April 26, 2002

Height: 186cm
Weight:
78kg

Position: Inside Midfielder

ATHLETIC PROFILES

2019 PRESEASON TESTING RESULTS

STANDING VERTICAL JUMP

Davis – 56cm
Trew – 60cm

RUNNING VERTICAL JUMP (R/L)

Davis – 71cm/68cm
Trew – 76cm/73cm

SPEED (20m)

Davis – 3.11 seconds
Trew – 3.11 seconds

AGILITY

Davis – 8.29 seconds
Trew – 8.66 seconds

ENDURANCE (YO-YO)

Davis – 20.3
Trew – 20.8

Strength is one key athletic area which is difficult to measure in these tests, but both manage to show it on-field. In these parameters, their respective results match up to those typical of inside midfielders; boasting agility good enough to see them slip out of congestion, power in their legs which translates to the solid jumping results, and not an overly large helping of speed. The two broke dead-even over 20 metres, and will look to improve their explosive burst over the course of 2020. Trew’s yo-yo test score of 20.8 is understandable considering the amount of time he spent on the sidelines in 2019, but both players should look to really boost that number to better suit their position at the next level.

>> PRESEASON TESTING RESULTS:

20m Sprint
Agility Test
Yo-yo Test
Jumps

ON-FIELD PROFILES

2019 STATISTICS

Davis:

2019 NAB League

13 games | 22.0 disposals | 2.4 marks | 7.8 tackles | 5.4 clearances | 5.1 inside 50s | 1.6 rebound 50s | 0.1 goals (1)

Trew:

2019 WAFL Colts

3 games | 29 disposals | 2.3 marks | 7 tackles | 2.3 inside 50s | 0.3 goals (1)

It is quite tough to take a hell of a lot away from numbers over such a wide gap in games, but the similarities are evident between these two players in the data provided.

Davis was a figure of consistency as a bottom-ager, moving through midfield as the Devils’ primary ball winner and main contested asset. His 22-disposal average can attest to that, along with averages of 7.8 tackles, 5.4 clearances, and 5.1 inside 50s. It goes to show that a lot of his possessions come at the coalface, with long kicks his outlet of choice.

Trew is a touch different in the sense that he extracts more significantly via hand, but his ball winning ability is just as prominent as he boasts a higher average across three games – largely thanks to a 40-disposal performance which we will get to later. The West Australian’s numbers stack up well across the board, and display the same contested strength as Davis.

BEST GAME

Davis:

2019 NAB League Round 8 vs. Dandenong

33 disposals
7 marks
3 tackles
5 clearances
9 inside 50s

Trew:

2019 WAFL Colts Round 3 vs. Perth

40 disposals
(24 handballs)
4 marks
10 tackles
4 inside 50s

Both prospects put their accumulative value on full show in our chosen performances, racking up game-high numbers and respective personal-bests for 2019 in terms of disposals.

Davis’ big outing came in tight a loss to Dandenong, which boasted the likes of Hayden Young and Mitchell Riordan in its midfield. Davis’ work rate came to the fore against stiff opposition, digging in to collect 33 disposals; split between his contested work (five clearances), and ever-improving spread away from it (seven marks). He pumped the ball inside attacking 50 nine times, too, showcasing that kick-first approach.

A handball-happy Trew also enjoyed a day out, but stands a level above Davis here in the sense that it came in a win, and he also managed to crack the 40-disposal mark. This was Trew’s final WAFL Colts game for the year, and was a display which had been building after efforts of 21 and 26 disposals. His two-way work rate came to the fore with 10 tackles, and that undeniable strength at the contest helped him flick out plenty of passes from the middle via hand.

STRENGTHS

Davis:

Contested ball/clearances
Consistency
Toughness
Tackling
Agility

Trew:

Contested ball/extraction
Releasing handballs
Strength
Tackling
Poise

While there are some obvious similarities across the strengths of either player, the subtle differences in their respective styles can also be observed.

The distinction of clearances on Davis’ side, to extraction for Trew in terms of contested ball is quite deliberate. While Trew is a terrific clearance player himself, he has been shown more significantly to use his strength and awareness to release handballs to teammates on the run, rather than simply look for meterage. On the other hand, Davis has largely taken the quick entry approach in similar situations, able to use his agility to make small openings and pump the ball forward via foot at the first opportunity. He seems to be finding a better balance in his short-range kicks and handball outlets as time goes on.

Both players are incredibly tough going both ways, and remain just as relevant in their defensive duties as they are going forward. Tackling is listed as a strength on either side, and rightly so as the two love to dig in with averages of over seven tackles each per game. But those slight differences in agility against strength, and first options by foot or hand are the things which set these two prospects apart.

IMPROVEMENTS

Davis:

Speed
Blazing away

Trew:

Breakaway speed

The improvements slapped next to the names of inside midfielders almost feel pre-set at times, and while these two may be working on some of those typical areas, they are more advanced than most overall.

Both will inevitably be working on their speed to achieve that eye-catching burst from congestion, despite not being punishably slow at this point in time. For Trew, it is listed as breakaway speed as he tends to stand up in tackles a touch more than Davis, and could benefit from translating his strength in different ways.

Davis has the agility to keep out of trouble, but often throws the ball straight on his boot in traffic. As mentioned, he seems to be improving in that area, and is quite capable of hitting up shorter options with time going inside 50. On the flip-side, Trew is a highly skilled disposer by foot and could be even more damaging if he utilised that asset a touch more – it is just a matter of finding balance.

Something which is not listed for either player, but will make them more complete prospects is the factor of scoreboard impact. Both managed just a goal apiece last year and while Trew has the penetration to find the goals from range, could always do so more often as Davis would hope to.

KEY SCOUTING NOTES

Davis:

2019 NAB League Round 11 vs. Northern

Responded well to being left out of the Allies’ 23, bouncing back to his usual ball-winning ways as a constant at the stoppages. Provides a good mix of competitiveness going both ways, finding the ball constantly but also tackling hard without it. He did show some burst and a willingness to kick forward on occasion – like with his centre clearance in the final term – and has the potential to be more effective in use. Was the skipper for the day as a bottom-ager, so has some pretty impressive traits already and is quite obviously talented.

Trew:

2018 Under 16 National Championships vs. Vic Metro

There’s a lot to like about the Swan Districts product as a solidly built midfielder. Starting at the opening centre bounce, Trew’s first big play was a releasing handball forward which opened up play, followed by a composed kick across the 50 that highlighted his rare vision. Later in the game, his overhead marking came into play as he floated between the 50 arcs, contesting hard in the air. Trew’s aggression also came to the fore as he was not afraid to get stuck in and lay some hard tackles.

Classic Contests: Bianco’s Chargers survive Devils scare

IF you are missing footy like we are, then let us somewhat salvage that with a look back in a new series of Classic Contests. In today’s contest we look at one of the would-have-been Round 14 clashes in the NAB League this year between the Oakleigh Chargers and Tasmania Devils. In this edition, we wind the clock back just one year to when the two sides met in Tasmania’s maiden full-time campaign.

2019 NAB League, Round 6
Saturday May 4, 11:30am
North Hobart Oval

TASMANIA DEVILS 3.0 | 5.2 | 6.5 | 8.7 (55)
OAKLEIGH CHARGERS 3.4 | 3.5 | 6.6 | 8.8 (56)

Goals:

Tasmania: R. Mansell 2, W. Harper 2, M. McGuinness, S. Banks, B. Gordon, J. Callow
Oakleigh:
T. Lovell 4, T. Graham, L. Westwood, H. Mundy, A. Tassell

Best:

Tasmania: H. Ireland, R. Mansell, O. Davis, P. Walker, L. Viney, I. Chugg
Oakleigh:
T. Bianco, J. Woodfull, J. May, H. Mastras, L. Westwood, S. Seach

Draftees in action:

Tasmania: Matthew McGuinness 
Oakleigh:
Trent Bianco

Oakleigh may have been the much higher fancied side in 2019 when compared to incoming full-time side, Tasmania, but the two regions sat level on points coming into their Round 6 NAB League clash. The Chargers got up in Rounds 1 and 2, but were starting to feel the effects of school and representative football commitments having suffered three-straight losses. A second interstate trip in three weeks would hardly help, with Tasmania gaining the benefit of another home game to help buoy its 2-2 record. The Devils had notched consecutive wins after their Round 2 debuts, but lost to Western in Round 5.

Co-captain Trent Bianco would taking the reigns solo as the sole eventual draftee in Oakleigh’s side to make the trip, while North Melbourne rookie Matt McGuinness was Tasmania’s lone AFL product afield with Mitchell O’Neill absent. In a boost to the Devils’ lineup, they would boast bottom-aged Allies hub members Oliver Davis, Sam Collins, and Jackson Callow, along with Patrick Walker and leading 2021 hopeful, Sam Banks.

As the action got underway at North Hobart Oval, the Victorians were unable to take full advantage of starting at the scoring end, taking a four-point lead into the first change as their four superior scoring shots all ended in behinds. Tasmania, blessed with kicking boots, showed them the way in the second term, keeping the Chargers goalless while adding two majors to snatch a nine-point buffer heading into half time.

One of the outstanding traits of Oakleigh’s side in 2019 was it was able to score quickly, and signs began to look ominous as the Chargers booted three goals within the first 11 minutes of the third term. The Devils were able to mount somewhat of a comeback, but some inaccurate kicking of their own late in the piece would prove costly. A grandstand finish was set up with just one point separating the sides heading into the final term, and the two teams did not disappoint.

Four lead changes would occur, with Banks giving Tasmania the jump early, only to see Thomas Lovell edge Oakleigh back in front twice with his third and fourth goals. Jye Menzie‘s shy at goal with under three minutes left on the clock would prove Tasmania’s last chance at victory, as Oakleigh broke the hearts of home fans and travelled back to the mainland with four points.

Lovell came up clutch with his four goals making up almost half of Oakleigh’s tally, but it was Bianco who proved the standout of the day. The Collingwood draftee was a cut above the rest, racking up a monster 42 disposals in what was a complete performance, putting him 14 touches ahead of the next-best ball winner – Josh May, 28 disposals. Fraser Elliot was another Charger to impress from midfield, while Davis (21 disposals) was Tasmania’s leading ball winner, and the pairing of Will Harper and Rhyan Mansell combined for four goals.

The Devils would go on to add just two more wins to their tally in 2019, putting up a valiant effort in Wildcard Round to lose by only six points to Calder. Oakleigh finished the regular season in third at 11-4, and went on to win the NAB League premiership on the back of an unstoppable late-season run. Six Chargers, including Bianco were drafted. Most famously, the region boasted both of the first two picks in the 2019 draft as Matt Rowell and Noah Anderson headed to the Gold Coast SUNS.

Classic Contests: Dragons blow Devils away on the road

IF you are missing footy like we are, then let us somewhat salvage that with a look back in a new series of Classic Contests. In today’s contest we look at one of the would-have-been Round 12 clashes in the NAB League this year between the Sandringham Dragons and Tasmania Devils. In this edition, we wind back the clock almost a year to late-2019, when the two sides met for the first time since Tasmania’s full-time induction into the competition.

2019 NAB League, Round 15
Saturday July 27, 11:00am
Invermay Park, Launceston

TASMANIA DEVILS 1.0 | 2.1 | 3.3 | 4.4 (28)
SANDRINGHAM DRAGONS 3.3 | 6.8 | 11.10 | 13.15 (93)

Goals:

Tasmania: O. Sanders, L. Gadomski, J. Chaplin, J. Callow.
Sandringham:
A. Hanrahan 3, K. Yorke 2, R. Bowman 2, R. Byrnes, J. Bowey, J. Bell, B. O’Leary, J. Mifsud, M. Bergman.

Best:

Tasmania: L. Viney, J. Callow, O. Davis, S. Collins, R. Mansell, M. McGuinness
Sandringham:
A. Hanrahan, R. Bowman, J. Bell, R. Byrnes, D. Chirgwin, M. Bergman

Draftees in action:

Tasmania: Matt McGuinness
Sandringham:
 Ryan Byrnes, Miles Bergman, Jack Bell

Not much more than pride was up for grabs as Sandringham travelled down to Tasmania to take on the Devils in Launceston, with the fate of the two sides all but already sealed. The Dragons were gunning for a top three spot to avoid Wildcard Round, while Tasmania was simply battling for position having fallen to 13th spot.

Neither side was in particularly outstanding form either, with Sandringham coming in having won in its previous outing against Dandenong, but the Dragons had lost three straight games before that and five of their last six overall to sit 8-5 in fourth. The Devils were 4-11 on the back of a five-game losing run, which would end up stretching to seven by season’s end.

Of significance were also the absentees for both teams, too, with Sandringham missing a raft of eventual draftees and combine invitees, including the likes of top 30 picks Fischer McAsey, Finn Maginness, and Josh Worrell. Mitch O’Neill was the biggest name missing for Tasmania, one of its two 2019 draftees, but the Devils maintained their four 2020 AFL Academy prospects in the side.

Keen to flex their superiority and gain some winning form on the eve of finals, the Dragons took control from the get-go with six scoring shots to one in the opening term helping them to a 15-point lead at the first break. They would extend it to 31 points by half time, again restricting Tasmania to just one major while piling on another three of their own.

Having got the jump, Sandringham well-and-truly put the result beyond doubt with a game-high five goals in the third term, and a couple more in the closing stanza for good measure as the Devils could only again manage a goal per the final two terms. The final margin sat at 65 points in favour of the travelling side, marking Sandringham’s third win by over 10 goals at that point in the season.

Over-ager Angus Hanrahan had a day out, leading all comers for goals (three) and disposals (33), with St Kilda draftee Ryan Byrnes (28 disposals, one goal) another to find both the ball and the goals. Matt McGuinness was Tasmania’s leading ball winner with 26 touches, while of the other draftees afield, Miles Bergman booted 1.2 from his 19 disposals, and Jack Bell also booted a major in his forward/ruck duties.

Despite boasting one of the more stacked Under 18 squads of recent times, Sandringham fell short of the top three and its premiership dream as injuries and some bad luck took toll, finishing fourth at 9-6 and losing to eventual premier, Oakleigh in the preliminary finals. Tasmania would end up losing seven-straight games to finish the season at 4-11 in 14th, but gave Calder a scare in Wildcard Round as the Devils went down by a single goal.

Squad predictions: 2020 Allies Under 18s

THE annual Under 18 National Championships may be the only chance we get to catch a glimpse of the class of 2020 before draft day, with carnival likely to take place in October. In the meantime, Draft Central takes a look at how each regional squad may line up should the championships come around, but with a few stipulations in place. We began with our Vic Metro, Vic Country, South Australian, and West Australian squad predictions, and today we take a look at the potential Allies line-up.

GUIDELINES:

  • Top-agers (2002-born) have been prioritised due to the limited season and exposure
  • Of those, AFL Academy Hub members also gain priority for the starting squad
  • The inclusion of bottom-agers (2003-born) in the hub, and top-agers outside it is limited
  • 19-year-old inclusions are also limited, having already staked their claims in previous years

A lot may change between now and when the squad will be announced, and it should be noted that players with known long-term injuries will not be picked here. Of course, the sides may vary greatly as players look to shift and develop in different positions, but each member has been selected based on the roles they have previously played. Given only previous form, preseason testing and scratch matches are what we have to go off, bolters are also difficult to gauge at this point.

Players named as depth outside of the initial squad below are inevitably options who will rotate through the side, and it is impossible to fit all the options within a list of 22. But without further ado, let’s get stuck into the fifth and final squad prediction, with the Allies’ talent broken down line-by-line. The Allies squad is made up of talent from NSW/ACT, Queensland, Tasmania, and the Northern Territory.

DEFENCE

FB – Brodie Lake (NT Thunder/Peel), Jack Johnston (Gold Coast), Patrick Walker (Tasmania)
HB – Charlie Byrne (Murray), Ryan Pickering (Gold Coast), Sam Collins (Tasmania)

Two Gold Coast Suns Academy members make up the heart of our proposed Allies defence, with genuine talls Jack Johnston (195cm) and Ryan Pickering (199cm) slotting into key position posts. The additions of Brodie Lake and Sam Collins contribute even further to the height and marking power of the defence, with Collins’ intercept and rebound qualities also valuable assets.

Collins’ fellow Tasmanian Patrick Walker should provide similarly astute ball use from defence at a shorter range, while Murray product Charlie Byrne also likes to push further afield and deal damage by foot. The back six should have no trouble competing aerially on the defensive side, while being able to yield an attacking threat on the turnover.


MIDFIELD

C – Saxon Crozier (Brisbane), Oliver Davis (Tasmania), Carter Michael (Brisbane)
FOL – Thomas Hofert (Gold Coast), Alex Davies (Gold Coast), Braeden Campbell (Sydney)

Queenslanders take up four of the six midfield spots in our Allies side, with Brisbane Lions Academy members Saxon Crozier and Carter Michael starting on either wing, while 201cm ruck Thomas Hofert has been tasked with tapping down to Gold Coast Academy teammate Alex Davies at the centre bounces.

There is plenty of grunt in the engine room trio of Davies, Braeden Campbell, and Oliver Davis; with Davies the tallest of the lot (191cm) as that pure big-bodied type, while Davis (182cm) is another extractor who comes in at a similar build to the speedy and versatile Campbell (180cm).

The likes of Crozier and Michael may fancy a run through the middle but seem well suited to the outside, with a number of flankers and depth options in our squad also able to pitch in. Still, we feel this is the best mix, and one which gives the Allies a great chance to compete strongly in the area in which each contest begins.


FORWARD

HF – Errol Gulden (Sydney), Josh Green (GWS), Joel Jeffrey (NT Thunder)
FF – Marco Rossmann (Sydney), Jackson Callow (Tasmania), Blake Coleman (Brisbane)

In a similar vein to the defensive mix, this forward six provides good versatility and some great marking power. Jackson Callow is the centrepiece at full forward, a physical key position type who is near-unstoppable with his contested marking, and may well take on ruck duties inside forward 50. Josh Green, brother of GWS draftee Tom, is a 192cm utility who can play up either end. He slots in at centre half-forward for now on account of his aerial ability.

The diminutive but brilliant Errol Gulden comes in on a forward flank but will have eyes on moving up to a wing, with fellow Swans Academy product Marco Rossmann a solid medium type who may also run through the midfield. In the opposite flank to Rossmann is exciting forward Blake Coleman, who along with Northern Territory prospect Joel Jeffrey, provides clean hands and a terrific goal sense. With silver service likely to come from a strong midfield core, this forward mix could do some damage at the national carnival when on song.


INTERCHANGE

INT – Marc Sheather (Sydney), Jared Dakin (Tasmania), Tahj Abberley (Brisbane), Maurice Rioli Jnr (NT Thunder/Oakleigh)

This interchange group is, well, incredibly interchangeable with the group of depth players listed below, but all bring something different to the side. Jared Dakin makes the cut as the only over-ager in the squad given he garnered interest at last year’s draft, and he’ll provide a good ball winning boost.

Tahj Abberley and Maurice Rioli Jnr add some x-factor and smarts at ground level as part of the rotational group. Abberley is likely to play as a small defender but is just as capable up forward or through midfield, while Rioli could well be the genuine small forward that the side is missing. Rounding out the chosen 22 is Marc Sheather, another versatile medium type who can play well above his size at either end given his athleticism.


SQUAD DEPTH

There remains a decent crop of top-agers who narrowly missed the cut, and some bottom-aged talent which will inevitably squeeze into the team minus any stipulations. Among the most unlucky to miss were AFL Academy hub members Rhys Nicholls and Aidan Fyfe, who could both slot in as half-backs or outside types. Kye Pfrengle is another defensive option who will get a look-in, while Jack Briskey and Jack Driscoll are taller types who should also rotate through the same line. Meanwhile, Tyrrell Lui and Ryan Eyers are prospects who may also be thereabouts.

In terms of top-agers outside of the AFL Academy intake, Tasmania’s Isaac Chugg is a terrific athlete, while Devils teammates Will Harper and Jye Menzie are well known to selectors. Sydney’s Pierce Roseby is a tough small who thrived in NSW/ACT colours, as did Max Pescud in the Maroon of Queensland.

Moving on to over-agers, and Tasmanian over-ager Hamish Allan would help the ruck stocks at 206cm, with GIANT-turned-Knight Liam Delahunty another tall who remains among the Under 18 ranks. In terms of Queensland-based 19-year-olds, the likes of forward movers Bruce Reville, Josh Gore, and Hewago Paul Oea have already shown plenty of promise.

Finally, an exciting group of bottom-aged talent is set to cause some selection headaches, lead by Tasmanian gun Sam Banks. He, and Tasmanian teammate Baynen Lowe impressed at Under 16 level enough to warrant NAB League selection in 2019. Queensland Under 16 MVP Austin Harris will also push his case as a small defender, while GIANTS Academy members Sam Stening and Josh Fahey are hard to deny, as is big Queensland forward Noah McFadyen.

>> READ UP ON THE 2020 ALLIES U18s:

Brisbane Lions Academy
Gold Coast SUNS Academy
GWS GIANTS Academy
Sydney Swans Academy
Tasmania Devils

AFL Draft Watch:

Tahj Abberley
Jackson Callow
Braeden Campbell
Oliver Davis
Errol Gulden

Marquee Matchups:

Jackson Callow vs. Cam Fleeton
Braeden Campbell vs. Corey Durdin
Alex Davies vs. Reef McInnes
Errol Gulden vs. Jake Bowey

Positional Analysis:

Key Forwards

>> 2020 UNDER 18 SQUAD PREDICTIONS:

South Australia
Vic Country
Vic Metro
Western Australia

AFL Draft Watch: Jackson Callow (Tasmania Devils/Allies)

IN the build up to football eventually returning, Draft Central takes a look at some of this year’s brightest names who have already represented their state at Under 17 or Under 18s level in 2019. While plenty can change between now and then, we will provide a bit of an insight into players, how they performed at the NAB League Preseason Testing Day hosted by Rookie Me, and some of our scouting notes on them from last year.

Next under the microscope in our AFL Draft Watch is Tasmania’s Jackson Callow, a powerful key forward who is not afraid to throw his weight around. The 193cm prospect was a mainstay in the Devils’ maiden full-time NAB League campaign, booting 24 goals in 14 games as his side’s focal point up forward. Callow also played a key role in North Launceston’s Tasmanian State League (TSL) premiership triumph, booting a game-high three goals in the decider.

After failing to break through for the 2019 National Championships, Callow seems a lock for the 2020 Allies Under 18 side and has fared well in his representative duties with Tasmania thus far. While he looks most comfortable inside forward 50, Callow can also pinch-hit in the ruck and was even tried in defence during the Under 17 All Stars showcase fixture. His physicality and unrivalled contested marking often draw multiple opponents, with the big-man hard to stop at full flight.

PLAYER PAGE:

Jackson Callow
North Launceston/Tasmania/Allies

DOB: June 11, 2002

Height: 193.6cm
Weight: 95.5kg

Position: Key Forward

2019 NAB LEAGUE STATS: 14 games | 13.6 disposals | 54% cont poss | 6 marks | 1.4 tackles | 2.6 inside 50s | 1.7 goals (24)

Strengths: Contested marking, aggression, strength, scoreboard impact
Improvements: Unknown versatility, goalkicking consistency

>> Marquee Matchup: Callow vs. Fleeton
>> Positional Analysis: Key Forwards

PRESEASON TESTING HIGHLIGHTS:

Standing Vertical Jump – 61cm
Running Vertical Jump (R/L) – 63cm/64cm
Speed (20m) – 3.08 seconds
Agility – 9.00 seconds
Endurance – 20.5

>> FULL RESULTS:
Jumps
Speed
Agility
Endurance

2019 SCOUTING NOTES:

2019 Under 17 Futures All Star Game

By: Ed Pascoe

The strong bodied key position forward had a solid game, showing he didn’t just rely on his size to take marks to kick his goals as he gathered a loose ball and kicked a lovely snap goal in the second quarter. He was moved to defence in the second half and looked better as the game went on taking a nice intercept mark in the last quarter, Callow looks to be the leading Tasmanian prospect for the 2020 draft.

2019 Allies Under 18 Trails vs. Vic Country/Metro

By: Peter Williams

The key forward presented nicely at the football and while he did not kick a major himself, pushed up the ground and was often the link between half-forward and deep forward, creating chances for teammates. He showed a nice field kick and a high work rate to hit-up a midfield teammate then pushed back to win it again, and put it out to Matt Conroy leading out in the square. Shared some of the ruck load while up forward as well.

2019 NAB League Round 12 vs. Eastern

By: Michael Alvaro

Callow looked like having a huge game after he booted three goals within the first half-hour, but was clamped well after the main break with Eastern ensuring he would compete against two or three markers in the air. He started off by winning a ground ball against his direct opponent deep inside 50 before snapping the first goal of the game, following up with a huge pack mark and set shot goal to highlight a scintillating opening. He also created Will Peppin’s goal after booting his third, marking deep in the pocket and kicking well inboard.

His physicality ensured that direct opponents were more occupied with holding him that getting to the ball, and Callow’s work off the deck was very good for a player of his size. He would go on to show as much by turning his opponent twice in the third term but missing the shot, eventually being restricted well.

2019 NAB League Round 4 vs. Calder

By: Scott Dougan

Callow was kept fairly quiet in the first term but was able to bounce back in the second. He took some nice marks on the lead in the forward half and due to his sticky hands, he was able to hold the majority of them. Callow’s third term was just unbelievable, with the bottom-aged big man taking four contested marks and booting three goals. In the end, Callow was the difference between the two sides and is definitely a very exciting prospect to keep a close eye on in his draft year.

2019 NAB League Round 3 vs. NT Thunder

By: Alex Gibson

Callow could have had a really, really big day. He dominated the Thunder’s defence all game and finished with five goals, however if he kicked straight could’ve easily had seven or eight to his name. Callow did not once get out-marked and either took the grab himself or brought the ball to ground, which his small forwards appreciated. Callow was the go-to man for the Devils and the well-built key forward’s work rate was impressive – often providing a target well up the ground.

>> MORE TASMANIA DEVILS CONTENT

>> CATCH UP ON OUR DRAFT WATCH SERIES

Vic Metro:
Jackson Cardillo
Nikolas Cox
Connor Downie
Reef McInnes
Archie Perkins

Vic Country:
Sam Berry
Jack Ginnivan
Nick Stevens
Jamarra Ugle-Hagan

South Australia:
Kaine Baldwin
Luke Edwards
Taj Schofield
Riley Thilthorpe

Western Australia:
Denver Grainger-Barras
Logan McDonald
Nathan O’Driscoll

Allies:
Braeden Campbell
Oliver Davis