Tag: TAC Cup

Draft Central All-Star Team matchup: East Fremantle vs. Murray Bushrangers

OUR next All-Star Team battle makes for an intriguing semi final clash, set to play out between a West Australian talent factory, and a powerhouse Victorian region in East Fremantle and the Murray Bushrangers respectively. The two captains voted in by the public as the All-Star Players of the AFL Draft era were West Coast Eagles champion Ben Cousins (East Fremantle) and current Collingwood star, Steele Sidebottom (Murray).

These clubs are seeded first (East Fremantle) and fourth (Murray) respectively, as the seed gap between each side closes with each passing fixture. The proposed Bushrangers squad outvoted Sturt, the Oakleigh Chargers and Northern Knights, while East Fremantle’s path to this stage came through the Calder Cannons and Sandringham Dragons after a first round bye. The winner will qualify for the Grand Final, set to face either the Port Adelaide Magpies or Geelong Falcons.

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TALKING POINTS

THE MIDFIELD BATTLE:

This one should be fairly straightforward, as East Fremantle arguably boasts the strongest starting midfield group in the draw. With Brownlow medalists and AFL premiership players, Cousins and Simon Black joined by current Carlton co-captain Patrick Cripps at the centre bounces, it’s hard to see any side beating that kind of balance through the engine room. Cripps provides the inside grunt, while Black is the silk, and Cousins the gut-running accumulator. Fremantle champion Paul Hasleby has even been pushed out to a wing, partnering the late Chris Mainwaring.

That’s not to say that Murray lags in the midfield department, with David Mundy, Clayton Oliver, and Tom Rockliff no slouches by any stretch. Add the running power of Sidebottom and dynamism of Brett Deledio on the outer, and you have a seriously talented group. While we would still take the Sharks’ starting centre bounce trio, what really sets them apart in this matchup is their depth. Not only have Elliot Yeo (half-back) and Andrew Swallow (half-forward) been squeezed out to the flanks, but the likes of Daniel Kerr, Shane Woewodin, Dom Cassisi, and Shaun McManus also remain on the interchange. Murray would be able to rotate Jack Ziebell and Steve Johnson through from the forwardline, but that kind of firepower is near-impossible to match.

You could hardly build a better midfield core if you tried than what East Fremantle lays claim to, so the Sharks clearly get the points in this midfield battle. With a balance of class, grunt, endurance, and depth, it’s everything you could ask for.

THE KEY POSITION STOCKS:

As has been the case with many of Murray’s matchups, its starting key position spine is arguably weaker than the opposition offering, but depth seems to give the Bushies a deal of versatility which cannot be matched. East Fremantle lays claim to Luke McPharlin and Harry Taylor down back, with Paddy Ryder accompanying Josh J. Kennedy up forward, and Aaron Sandilands taking on the ruck duties. Bigman Darren Bennett also features in the forward pocket, potentially able to fill Ryder’s spot once the Port player gives Sandilands a chop-out on the ball. With McPharlin and Taylor also know to swing forward at times, the Sharks have a pretty handy rotation, with Cale Hooker also in the mix.

But Murray’s may well be better through a sheer weight of options. Where East Fremantle may struggle for numbers, the Bushrangers thrive, able to fit a bunch of pieces to its key position puzzle. Ben Reid and Alipate Carlile make up the defensive pairing, while Barry Hall and Jarrad Waite are a solid forward combination. Add Fraser Gehrig and ruckman Steven King to the mix, and the spine is quite good. The difference makers come from the bench though, with Ben McEvoy and Justin Koschitzke both able to plug gaps through the ruck or up either end, while Sam Reid could also prove a handy swingman – much like his brother.

By way of its diversity and superior range of options, Murray takes out the key position battle overall, even if East Fremantle’s starters arguably hold a slight edge.

SUMMARY:

To cut a long story short, we’re backing our first seed to qualify for the Grand Final. As one of the most prolific producers of high-level West Australian talent, East Fremantle simply boasts too much class for many sides to handle. Murray matches up well, and may even get ahead in some areas, but would not be able to match the Sharks where it matters most, in midfield. They’re strong everywhere else too, and will be difficult to top in the decider.

Which All-Star Team are you picking?
East Fremantle Sharks
Murray Bushrangers
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Draft Central All-Star Team matchup: Murray Bushrangers vs. Northern Knights

OUR next All-Star Team battle makes for another intriguing quarter final clash, set to play out between Victorian regions, in the Murray Bushrangers and Northern Knights. The two captains voted in by the public as the All-Star Players of the AFL Draft era were current Collingwood star, Steele Sidebottom (Murray) and the AFL’s games record holder, Brent Harvey (Northern).

These clubs are seeded fourth (Murray) and fifth (Northern) respectively, as the gap closes to its narrowest margin yet in our overall draw. The proposed Bushrangers squad outvoted Sturt and the Oakleigh Chargers, while Northern’s path to this stage came through Norwood and Swan Districts. The winner will qualify for the semi finals, set to face either East Fremantle or the Sandringham Dragons.

>> SCROLL TO VIEW THE FULL TEAMS

TALKING POINTS

THE REBOUNDERS:

Both defences are stacked, as one would come to expect at this stage of the draw, with rebounding quality a clear strength across either back six. The Stingrays are well stocked in the running department, as flankers Jack Crisp and Jarrod Harbrow are supported by Joel Smith and Zac Williams on the last line. While Harbrow and Williams possess pure pace to break the lines, Smith and Crisp are reliable users by foot who can create in transition. Add the endurance of Sidebottom and power of Brett Deledio up on either wing, and there threatens to be some serious force behind Murray’s attacking play.

But the Knights are also well stocked, with the Shaw brothers – Rhyce and Heath – both sure to generate some forward momentum out of defensive 50. Fellow former Magpie Ben Johnson has a weaponous left peg, while Chris Johnson provides a good balance to the back six alongside Dylan Grimes, and Nick Vlaustin off the bench. Further afield, the likes of Leigh Montagna, David Zaharakis, and Brent Stanton will run all day between the arcs, with Paul Licuria another who accumulates with ease.

Ultimately, it’s clear both sides have serious run in their legs, particularly in defence. But given Northern’s elite runners further afield allow for a greater balance in the defensive setup, we give the Knights a big tick in that third of the ground.

THE KEY POSITION STOCKS:

Northern’s spine has an ominous look about it, propped up by four formidable key position starters. Collingwood fans would get a good hit of nostalgia seeing Simon Prestigiacomo and Anthony Rocca line up at opposite ends, accompanied by Michael Hurley and Lance Whitnall respectively. In terms of starting stocks, particularly in defence, the Knights arguably have Murray covered. Jarrad Waite and Barry Hall stack up well inside forward 50, with Ben Reid and Alipate Carlile up the other end for the Bushrangers.

However, the country region seems to gain an edge in terms of depth, laying claim to some high level bench depth. Ben McEvoy and Justin Koschitzke, who can both rotate through the ruck or at either end of the ground, make for sound back-up, along with Fraser Gehrig hidden in the forward pocket. The ruck duel between Murray’s Steven King and Northern’s Matthew Kreuzer is difficult to split, so it seems Murray has the greater weight of options in the tall department.

THE DEEP MIDFIELDS:

As is the case with almost every side seeded in the top 10, the midfields run deep. Northern’s centre bounce starters jump off the page, with Adam Simpson at the core alongside Trent Cotchin and Marcus Bontempelli. Murray’s selection of David Mundy, Clayton Oliver, and Tom Rockliff is solid in its own right, but doesn’t quite compare to what the Knights have to offer. On the outer, Sidebottom and Deledio ensure Northern’s Montagna and Licuria will be in for a tough day at the office, while the options of Jack Ziebell and Steve Johnson linger up forward. Northern also has options, with Harvey and Josh Caddy among those able to add a spark when required. This is a tough one given Murray’s range of options once again, compared to the weight of elite talent on Northern’s side.

SUMMARY:

As the rankings would suggest, there is hardly anything to split these two sides. Northern was a prolific talent region throughout the 90s and early-2000s, hence why so many of their All-Stars are already household names. Murray has long been a hotbed of talent as far as regional areas go, and it clearly shows in its well-balanced, well-stocked side. In a flip of the coin, and given the areas touched on above, I am taking Northern.

Which All-Star Team are you picking?
Murray Bushrangers
Northern Knights
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Draft Central All-Star Team matchup: Geelong Falcons vs. South Fremantle

OUR next All-Star Team battle makes for another intriguing quarter final clash, set to play out between a powerhouse Victorian region and West Australian club, in the Geelong Falcons and South Fremantle Bulldogs, respectively. The two captains voted in by the public as the All-Star Players of the AFL Draft era were ‘the little master’ Gary Ablett Jnr (Geelong Falcons) and West Coast great Peter Matera (South Fremantle).

These clubs are seeded second (Geelong Falcons) and 10th (South Fremantle) respectively, meaning the Bulldogs will be made to pull off another upset in order to advance. Our proposed Falcons squad outvoted the Greater Western Victoria Rebels after a first-round bye, while South’s path to this stage came through Claremont and the Bendigo Pioneers. The winner will qualify for the semi finals, set to face the Port Adelaide Magpies/Dandenong Stingrays.

>> SCROLL TO VIEW THE FULL TEAMS

TALKING POINTS

THE STINGY DEFENCES:

While there lies plenty more glitz and glamour further afield, a solid starting point is the stingy defences of either side. Geelong’s is one of the best of the lot, boasting premiership skippers Luke Hodge and Nick Maxwell at half-back, while Geelong pair Matthew Scarlett and Tom Stewart take up the key position posts, and Steven Baker takes up the opposite pocket of Will Schofield. If you’re left wanting more, the versatile Lachlan Henderson and Matt McGuire await rotation from the bench, potentially adding a touch more height to deal with monster key forwards. The marking power is evident, as is the pure defensive nous, and leadership in spades. Baker’s addition also adds a much-needed small option, able to lockdown the liveliest of opposition forwards.

We feared there would be no match for the Geelong defence, but alas, South Fremantle’s back six comes in strong. The Bulldogs lay claim to a premiership captain of their own, in outgoing Essendon coach and Eagles champion John Worsfold, who slots in alongside fellow West Coast great Glen Jakovich at half-back. With the ever-reliable Darren Gaspar and James Clement behind them, it would take something special to penetrate South Freo’s last line. Let’s not forget Paul Duffield in the pocket, along with ‘Miracle on Grass’ hero Ash McGrath at half-back, who add a different dimension to the back six.

On paper, these defences are difficult to split. Balance is a key aspect to the equation, slightly favouring South, but versatility looks to clearly be in Geelong’s favour, with the bench depth allowing for a good range of possible lineups. The players themselves, namely Hodge, Maxwell, and Stewart can play a variety of roles down back both below and above their heights, but the key position strength remains. We’re sticking with the Falcons here, just.

THE MIDFIELD BATTLE:

Two contrasting midfields also do battle when these sides line up, with the Geelong side boasting a rich vein of ball winners, while South Fremantle’s prime movers are most significantly based on the outer. Local Cats premiership players Cameron Ling and Jimmy Bartel feature at the heart of Geelong’s engine room alongside Travis Boak, making for a durable trio which balances both sides of the game well. South also lays claim to a tagging centreman in Clinton Jones, who is joined by Fremantle stalwart Peter Bell and current Eagles star, Tim Kelly. In terms of credentials at the centre bounce, Geelong takes the chocolates. That’s without touching on the ruck battle, which looks to also favour Geelong as Matthew Primus opposes Jaymie Graham.

But on the outside is where it gets interesting, with Matera and Nicky Winmar making for one hell of a fine wing pairing. Jordan Lewis and Jack Steven are no slouches, but would have their hands well and truly full with those two for opposition. Steven’s prime running power would serve him well, as would Lewis’ hardness and ball use, but we feel the Bulldogs have their counterparts found out in this area.

Then there is the question of depth, which will also spawn a later talking point. Geelong could well make up three or four centre bounce combinations to rival that of every club, but see many of their midfield options squeezed out to flanks or the bench. While South Fremantle’s proposed engine room is the cream of its crop, Geelong has the like of Patrick Dangerfield, Ablett Jnr, and Shaun Higgins up forward, while Taylor Adams, Ben Cunnington, and Devon Smith remain benched. That kind of depth is scary, and proves another tick for the stacked Falcons side.

THE FORWARD BALANCE:

As alluded to, the weight of Geelong’s midfield depth somewhat hinders its balance on other lines, namely up forward. While the likes of Dangerfield and Ablett Jnr are both no strangers to the forward 50, their work as midfielders is what they are primarily known for. Add Higgins into the mix, and that’s three of the four flanks/pockets filled up by improvised forwards. Luckily, they may not be needed much at ground level with Scott Lucas and Jonathan Brown in the key position posts.

But we feel the balance of South Fremantle’s front six looks much better. Peter Sumich is a terrific spearhead, aided aerially and in strength by Brad Hardie and Allen Jakovich, while true smalls in Phillip Matera and Jeff Farmer are joined by Mark Williams, who made the ‘shotgun’ celebration famous (or, infamous). Add Andrew Krakouer and Ashley Sampi to the mix off the bench, and you have a truly dynamic forward set-up, laden with x-factor and match winners. It gives the Bulldogs a good edge over Geelong, despite its overspill of talent.

SUMMARY:

While South Fremantle lays claim to some important points of difference over the second-ranked Geelong side, it is difficult to look past the Falcons’ weight of elite talent. Geelong’s midfield and defence come up trumps, and there is plenty of firepower up forward despite a lesser structure when compared to South’s. We’re taking the Falcons.

Which All-Star Team do you think would win?
Geelong Falcons
South Fremantle
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Draft Central All-Star Team matchup: Port Adelaide Magpies vs. Gippsland Power

OUR next All-Star Team battle is between a South Australian club in the Port Adelaide Magpies, and a Victorian region in the Gippsland Power. The two captains voted in by the public as the All-Star Players of the AFL Draft era were Collingwood greats, Nathan Buckley (Port Adelaide) and Scott Pendlebury (Gippsland).

TEAMS:

These clubs are seeded third (Port Adelaide) and 14th (Gippsland) respectively, forming another Round of 16 clash in our draw. Port defeated Peel Thunder to earn its place in the stage, while Gippsland got the nod over South Adelaide. The winner will qualify for the quarter finals, set to face either West Adelaide or the Dandenong Stingrays.

STRENGTHS:

It’s a near-pointless task identifying the strengths of our proposed Port Adelaide Magpies side, because it is ridiculously good across all three lines. The defence is terrific, headed by the Wakelin brothers – Darryl and Shane – while Brownlow medalists Gavin Wanganeen and Andrew McLeod feature on one side, and are accompanied by 300-gamer Corey Enright and Graham Johncock on the other.

There’s such a great mix of skill and solidity in that bunch, and same goes for the midfield group. The brawn of Buckley and Scott Thompson is complemented well by the presence of Craig Bradley, with the trio boasting nearly 1000 games of AFL experience between them. A bit of x-factor is also evident as Byron Pickett lines up on the wing, while Alan Didak takes his place up forward.

Gippsland’s midfield combination makes for arguably its strongest line, with Pendlebury at the heart of it alongside fellow premiership Magpie, Dale Thomas and Essendon captain, Dyson Heppell. Their presence pushes Brendon Goddard out to the wing, making for a versatile mix of engine room operators. The rebounding quality in defence is also prevalent, led by former Bulldogs skipper Robert Murphy and current Carlton co-captain Sam Docherty, while Jason Gram and David Wojcinski take up either pocket. Needless to say, the side is also made up of plenty of leadership material.

WEAKNESSES:

Picking out weaknesses in the Port Adelaide side is like splitting hairs, though one slight issue may emerge against even stronger sides. While quite capable as a premiership player, Scott Lycett is billed to carry the ruck duties largely alone, and would even be tested against the Power as Leigh Brown supports Nathan Vardy.

While Brown takes his spot deep in Gippsland’s forwardline, the Power’s lack of a couple more true key position players could be costly. The 191cm Sean Dempster and 194cm Mark Stevens slot in up either end, and are surrounded by plenty of class.

SUMMARY:

You simply cannot go past the Port Adelaide Magpies in this matchup, with their class across the board simply too much for the Power. The Magpies match, if not beat Gippsland’s greatest strengths, and will go deep in this tournament.

Which All-Star Team would you pick?
Port Adelaide Magpies
Gippsland Power
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Draft Central All-Star Team matchup: Sandringham Dragons vs. Glenelg Tigers

OUR next All-Star Team battle is between a Victorian region in the Sandringham Dragons, and a South Australian club in the Glenelg Tigers. The two captains voted in by the public as the All-Star Players of the AFL Draft era were Chris Judd (Sandringham) and Stephen Kernahan (Glenelg).

TEAMS:

These clubs are seeded eighth (Sandringham) and ninth (Glenelg) respectively, forming another Round of 16 clash in our draw. It is our closest matchup yet, with just one place separating the two sides. The winner will qualify for the quarter finals, set to face top seed East Fremantle.

STRENGTHS:

Needless to say as we enter the top 10 realm, both of these sides boast a bunch of high-end AFL talent across each line. Sandringham lays claim to one of the best midfields of the lot, led by Judd who is supported by the likes of Josh Kennedy and Luke Ball, while Jobe Watson is pushed out to a wing alongside Zac Merrett. That’s not to mention Andrew McGrath at half-back and Josh Kelly at half-forward, with Tim Taranto and Angus Brayshaw also waiting in the wings. Scary depth.

Glenelg’s defence is arguably its best line, with the versatile Rod Jameson lining up at full back and Chad Cornes in front of him, while former Carlton greats Andrew McKay and Bryce Gibbs line up at half-back. Ironically, McKay’s daughter Abbie, and son Charlie have both recently come through the Sandringham program. Andrew Mackie is also a key part of the back six, which is rounded out by Tom Logan.

WEAKNESSES:

Both teams are a touch undersized at full back, though both players would arguably fare no worse as super competitors. Jason Blake (189cm) takes up the role for Sandringham, while Jameson (185cm) is Glenelg’s man. Apart from that factor, finding weaknesses is like splitting hairs.

SUMMARY:

It is a tight one, but Sandringham is hard to look past here. There is some serious firepower on both sides, but with such a deep midfield a forwardline to match the Bays, and greater bench depth, it is the Dragons who we feel come out on top.

Which All-Star Team would you pick?
Sandringham Dragons
Glenelg Tigers

Draft Central All-Star Team matchup: South Fremantle vs. Bendigo Pioneers

OUR next All-Star Team battle is one between a South Australian club and Victorian region, in South Fremantle and the Bendigo Pioneers. The two captains voted in by the public as the All-Star Players of the AFL Draft era were Peter Matera (South Fremantle) and Dustin Martin (Bendigo Pioneers).

TEAMS:

These clubs are seeded 10th (South Fremantle) and 23rd (Bendigo Pioneers) respectively, and makes up the penultimate clash in the second half of our draw. The winner will qualify for the Round of 16 stage.

STRENGTHS:

South Fremantle is a team which is strong across the board, boasting legendary talent on each line and some serious x-factor. With Matera and Nicky Winmar featuring on the outside, with Tim Kelly streaming through the middle and Jeff Farmer up forward, this Bulldogs team would provide plenty of highlights and attacking flair. That’s not to mention the additions of Andrew Krakouer and Ashley Sampi off the bench. The defensive solidity is there too, with West Coast Eagles premiership players Glen Jakovich and John Worsfold teaming up once again, while Darren Gaspar and James Clement feature on the last line. Competitive as you will get.

The Pioneers side is also well equipped up forward in terms on x-factor, with high fliers Chris Tarrant and Andrew Walker joined by Nathan Brown and Jake Stringer. The other obvious area of strength is Bendigo’s midfield, led by Martin and Joel Selwood. The pair are complimented by Scott Selwood at the centre bounces, with the class of Nick Dal Santo and brawn of Michael Braun on the outer. The engine room depth also extends to the interchange bench, where a couple more Selwood’s are named among others.

WEAKNESSES:

While both are inevitably relatively strong teams, there are a couple of areas which could do with a boost. South Fremantle’s ruck stocks, or lack thereof sees the recently released Cam McCarthy take up that position, despite playing as an undersized key forward for most of his career. The bench depth also leaves a little to be desired in terms of consistency, though we doubt some of the starting stars would even warrant rotation.

Bendigo’s key position depth is also an area of slight weakness, with terrific talent available in at least one of the two posts up either end. Akin to the Bulldogs, Bendigo’s ruck spot is filled by a key position forward in Nathan Thompson, though the midfielders named would hardly need a dominant ruckman to find their own ball. Some added tall options on the bench would also have been handy.

SUMMARY:

We are backing South Fremantle to get up in this one, with just a touch more class around the ground despite Bendigo’s midfield prowess. They should be stingy at one end, and free-flowing up the other.

 

Which All-Star team are you picking?
South Fremantle
Bendigo Pioneers
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Classic Contests: Eight-goal first term helps Falcons eliminate Bushies

IF you are missing footy like we are, then let us somewhat salvage that with a look back in our series of Classic Contests. In today’s contest we look at another clash between the NAB League rivals to complete our full series, and today’s battle is between the Geelong Falcons and Murray Bushrangers. In this edition, we wind back the clock to 2012, when the two sides met in a free-flowing elimination final.

2012 TAC Cup, Elimination Final
Saturday September 1, 11:45am
Princes Park

MURRAY BUSHRANGERS 0.1 | 6.3 | 8.7 | 9.8 (62)
GEELONG FALCONS 8.0 | 8.0 | 12.1 | 16.6 (102)

GOALS:

Murray: K. Antonowicz 2, J. Porter 2, J. Cousins, L. Howe, N. Drummond, M. Taberner, T. Clurey
Geelong:
T. Batarilo 3, D. Bond 2, S. Dixon 2, J. Sharp 2, M. Wood 2, L. Taylor, D. Lang, A. Christensen, D. Gardiner, J. Saunders

BEST:

Murray: L. Hampton, J. Cousins, S. Martyn, M. Gibbons, J. Woodcock, M. Brett
Geelong:
T. Gribble, J. Saunders, M. Wood, S. Dixon, J. Tsitas, F. Fort

Draftees in action:

Murray: Tom Clurey, Matt Taberner, Josh Prudden, Nathan Drummond, Michael Gibbons, Jarman Impey
Geelong: Josh Saunders, Mason Wood, Darcy Fort, Lewis Taylor, Nick Bourke, Darcy Gardiner, Darcy Lang, Sam Russell

An eight-goal to nil first term helped set up the Geelong Falcons’ 2012 elimination final triumph over Murray, proving the perfect start to their TAC Cup finals campaign. The Bushrangers went into the clash as a steady favourite having finished fifth at 10-7. Their double-digit win tally was two figures higher than that of Geelong, who landed in eighth spot with an 8-8-1 record.

Form was not exactly kind to either region, as they both failed to win in three of their last six outings. The two sides had met twice before in that season, and the ledger sat at one win apiece after Murray won by 34 points in Round 4, while Geelong snuck home by three points in Round 10. As was the case in those fixtures, this knockout bout would be played on neutral territory.

Clearly out to prove they weren’t making up the numbers, the Falcons shot out of the blocks and put all eight of their first term scoring shots through the big sticks. But it was their turn to go goalless in the second period, as Murray hit back with six majors to keep within reach at the main break, still nine points adrift. The fightback would only spur Geelong back into action though, as the lower-ranked side clicked back into scoring gear with four goals in each of the final two terms to run out comfortable 40-point winners.

Prolific state leaguer Tom Gribble was named Geelong’s best on the day, racking up a monster 40 disposals, while draftees Mason Wood (18 disposals, eight marks, two goals) and Josh Saunders (22 disposals, seven tackles, one goal) were also amongst it. Scott Dixon was another to find both the ball and goals with 22 touches and two majors, while James Tsitas had it 25 times. Other AFL products to feature included Darcy Lang (20 disposals, one goal), Lewis Taylor (17 disposals, one goal), Nick Bourke (22 disposals), and Darcy Fort (26 hitouts).

Even as a bottom-ager, Michael Gibbons managed to accumulate a mountain of possession for Murray, finishing with 30 disposals. Lonnie Hampton (16 disposals) was named the best Bushranger though, followed by Joseph Cousins (10 disposals, five marks, one goal). Among the future draftees afield, Tom Clurey and Nathan Drummond both hit the scoreboard, while Josh Prudden gathered 21 disposals, Jarman Impey had 15, and Matt Taberner booted a goal from his 10 disposals and six marks.

While the Bushrangers’ promising season ended there and then, the Falcons would go on to face Sandringham in the semi finals. They went down by 25 points, with the 2012 season most famous for its famous golden point Grand Final where Jack Macrae won Oakleigh a thriller against Gippsland.

Featured Image: Brian Bartlett/News Corp

Classic Contests: Coffield winner sees Knights sink the Stingrays

Featured Image: Robert Prezioso/AFL Media/Getty Images

CLASSIC CONTEST

IF you are missing footy like we are, then let us somewhat salvage that with a look back in our series of Classic Contests. In today’s contest we look at another clash between the NAB League rivals to complete our full series, and today’s battle is between the Dandenong Stingrays and Northern Knights. In this edition, we wind back the clock to 2017, when the Knights hosted their county counterparts in an early-season heart-stopper.

2017 TAC Cup, Round 6
Saturday May 6, 10:30am
Preston City Oval

NORTHERN KNIGHTS 0.1 | 5.3 | 6.3 | 10.9 (69)
DANDENONG STINGRAYS 2.6 | 5.7 | 7.12 | 9.12 (66)

GOALS:

Northern: J. Shea 4, N. Coffield 2, J. Petruccelle, S. Binion, O. Stapleton, B. Gillard
Dandenong: 
T. De Koning 3, J. Nanscawen 3, R. Piper, L. Young, H. Clark

BEST:

Northern: J. Shea, J. Petruccelle, O. Wilson, S. Binion, J. Grace, M. Andrews
Dandenong: 
A. Paterson, T. Murphy, J. Davies, T. Dekoning, B. Williams, W. Hamill

Draftees in action:

Northern: Nick Coffield, Jack Petruccelle
Dandenong: Hunter Clark, Tom De Koning, Tom Murphy, Lachie Young, Sam Fletcher, Bailey Williams, Will Hamill

>> Scouting Notes: 2017 TAC Cup – Round 6

There wasn’t much splitting the Northern Knights and Dandenong Stingrays as they readied to face-off in Round 6 of the 2017 TAC Cup season. Both regions sat comfortably in the top eight with 3-2 records, but were searching for their first set of consecutive wins having struggled to string together consistent form to that point. Barring a draw, one of the two sides would do so in this game.

A bunch of top-end junior talent missed out on taking to Preston City Oval for the clash, with Northern going in without Patrick Naish and Tom McKenzie, while the likes of Aiden Bonar, Luke Davies-Uniacke, and Oscar Clavarino were among Dandenong’s glaring top-age absentees. Still, quality remained in the form of Nick Coffield and Jack Petruccelle for the home side, with Hunter Clark and Tom De Koning among the most promising Stingrays to feature in the line-up.

Boasting arguably a greater depth of talent, the Stingrays sought to take toll as they began proceedings kicking towards the slightly advantageous end. Two majors was the best they could manage from eight scoring shots, though keeping Northern goalless helped to build a handy quarter-time buffer. After breaking five goals ahead in the second term, that lead was slashed in the as Northern piled on its first five goals to remain just four points adrift at the main break.

The game began to close up a touch in the third period as Dandenong looked to consolidate. The Stingrays boasted a 15-point lead at the last break, and stretched it to 21 in the final term, but the Knights weren’t done yet. Having only managed six goals across the first three quarters, Northern sunk home four late majors to snatch a memorable home victory, with Coffield swinging forward to claim the winning goal. Pressure machine Ollie Wilson also stamped his impact, with the most important of his 11 tackles coming in the dying stages as his Dandenong opponent ran into an open goal.

Jamison Shea was named best for his four-goal performance in the navy, black, and white. Petruccelle was lively with 20 disposals and a goal, while Coffield finished with two majors from 22 touches, and the likes of Mitch Andrews (32 disposals, 12 marks) and Braedyn Gillard (23 disposals, 10 tackles) also made an impact. Angus Paterson was Dandenong’s best with seven marks down back, followed closely by the likes of Tom Murphy (29 disposals) and De Koning (three goals). Fellow draftees Bailey Williams (19 hitouts) and Will Hamill were also named among the best, while Clark racked up 34 touches and laid seven tackles in the loss.

After finally claiming consecutive wins, the Knights would go on to add just three more for the remainder of the season. They finished eighth at 7-10-1, losing convincingly to Oakleigh in their elimination final dig. Dandenong (12-6) improved to third come the end of the regular season, and while the Stingrays pulled off a terrific finals win over Eastern, they were knocked out by eventual premier, Geelong one game away from the Grand Final.

Classic Contests: Saad’s seven fires Cannons to victory over Chargers

IF you are missing footy like we are, then let us somewhat salvage that with a look back in our series of Classic Contests. In today’s contest we look at another clash between the NAB League rivals to complete our full series, and today’s battle is between the Gippsland Power and Western Jets. In this edition, we wind back the clock to early 2017, when the two sides went down to the wire in a game of heavy momentum swings.

2016 TAC Cup, Round 9
Saturday June 4, 11:30am
Highgate Reserve

CALDER CANNONS 1.5 | 4.9 | 7.14 | 9.16 (70)
OAKLEIGH CHARGERS 5.3 | 8.6 | 8.6 | 9.8 (62)

GOALS:

Calder: M. Saad 7, K. Brown, B. Ronke
Oakleigh:
A. Moate 3, X. Morgan 2, L. Bugeja, M. Young, X. Jordan, L. Walker

BEST:

Calder: M. Saad, B. Ronke, Z. Guthrie, H. Blythe, B. Caluzzi, B. Bernacki
Oakleigh:
A. Moate 3, X. Morgan 2, L. Bugeja, M. Young, X. Jordan, L. Walker

Draftees in action:

Calder: Ben Ronke, Zach Guthrie
Oakleigh: Jordan Ridley, Taylin Duman

Conditions at Highgate Reserve often blanket the ability of even the most potent match winners, but all the rain and wind in the world could do little to stop Muhammad Saad in early June, 2016. The brother of Essendon speedster, Adam put on a seven-goal show to inspire his Calder Cannons to a comeback victory over the Oakleigh Chargers in Round 9 of the TAC Cup season,

The Cannons needed something special to turn their season around, sitting 10th with two wins from eight games – including losses in their first four outings, and two in the last fortnight. Oakleigh was faring a touch better in seventh at 4-4, but had lost three of its last four games in what was the start of a mid-season skid. The Chargers would also go in without a considerable amount of top-end, top-age talent, including the likes of Josh Daicos, Nick Larkey, and Ed Phillips.

But through the weather and absentees, Oakleigh showed its class with a five goals to one opening term, making much better of its eight scoring shots (5.3) compared to the hosts’ six (1.5). The buffer would remain relatively the same heading into the main break, as the Chargers got out to a six-goal lead, but had the margin reigned back to 21 points at half-time.

Saad had already clicked into gear, booting a couple of majors to keep his side within reach, before flicking the switch midway through the third term to help the Cannons hit the front. The game was on the line with Calder ahead by two points at three quarter time, and the ascendancy would change hands multiple times in the final term. Saad proved the difference again, putting the Cannons back in front for good as they ran out eight-point victors.

With seven of Calder’s total nine goals, the number 43 was inevitably named best afield for his remarkable exploits inside forward 50. Ben Ronke was one of two other Cannons to hit the scoreboard, with fellow draftee Zach Guthrie played his part up the other end of the field. Adam Moate booted three majors for Oakleigh, while Xavier Jordan was named the most valuable Charger.

The result proved somewhat of a turning point for the Cannons, as they shot back into finals contention and eventually finished the regular season in seventh (8-9). The Chargers landed in sixth with an identical record, but exacted revenge with a 106-point elimination final belting, before eventually going down in the preliminary finals to Murray.

Featured Image: Greg Kowalczewski/News Corp

Classic Contests: Jets, Power share 36 minor scores in Round 4 thriller

IF you are missing footy like we are, then let us somewhat salvage that with a look back in our series of Classic Contests. In today’s contest we look at another clash between the NAB League rivals to complete our full series, and today’s battle is between the Gippsland Power and Western Jets. In this edition, we wind back the clock to early 2017, when the two sides went down to the wire in a game of heavy momentum swings.

2017 TAC Cup, Round 4
Saturday April 22, 2:00pm
Downer Oval

WESTERN JETS 3.10 | 4.11 | 5.15 | 9.21 (75)
GIPPSLAND POWER 1.3 | 5.9 | 9.12 | 9.15 (69)

GOALS:

Western: C. Thar 2, O. King, J. Hazik, Z. Butters, L. Hitch, J. Noonan, J. Dundon, B. Smokrovic
Gippsland:
M. McGannon 2, I. Mosquito 2, W. Broadbent 2, C. Henness, A. Quigley, N. Hogan

BEST:

Western: J. Dundon, Z. Butters, B. McGregor, S. Radovanovic, C. Thar, N. Stuhldreier
Gippsland:
W. Stephenson, S. Masterson, J. Hudson, T. Bindley, B. Motton, A. Hodge

Draftees in action:

Western: Tristan Xerri, Buku Khamis, Zak Butters, Xavier O’Halloran
Gippsland: Callum Porter, Xavier Duursma, Irving Mosquito

A pair of teams looking to even up their negative records met in Round 4 of the 2017 TAC Cup season, with Gippsland and Western sitting on the precipice of the top eight at 1-2 apiece. The Power had just broken through for their first win of the campaign a week earlier, while the Jets’ sole set of premiership points were earned in Round 2.

Some notable bottom-age talent took the field, with current Port Adelaide wombo combo Zak Butters (Western) taking on Xavier Duursma (Gippsland), while the highly touted Xavier O’Halloran also lined up for the Jets, and soon-to-be Essendon debutant Irving Mosquito was stationed up forward for Gippsland. Arguably the most glaring absentees were Western’s best two top-age prospects, in Cam Rayner and Lachlan Fogarty.

In somewhat of an omen for things to come, Western made the better start, albeit an inaccurate one shooting towards the scoring end at Downer Oval, Williamstown. A Mosquito major split the Jets’ 3.10 with one quarter played, and ended up being the difference come half time after Gippsland enjoyed its own period of dominance in the second term. A four-point lead was extended to 21 at the final break, as the hosts continued to struggle in front of goal.

A mad scramble for the Jets’ kicking boots must have finally become fruitful over that break, as Western stormed home with four goals to nil in the fourth period to snatch victory by a single goal. Gun small midfielder Connor Thar got the ball rolling with two majors in the opening 10 minutes, before Jack Noonan sealed the deal with less than 60 seconds left on the clock.

Judah Dundon, whose late third term goal gave Western a sniff, was named his side’s best player ahead of Butters and Thar, while O’Halloran racked up 23 disposals. Will Stephenson was adjudged the top Power performer with Sean Masterson in tow, while Mosquito added two goals to Gippsland’s cause and Aiden Quigley had 25 touches.

The Jets weren’t able to scrape themselves into finals contention throughout the year, finishing the regular season in 10th at 6-12. Gippsland scrounged enough wins to do so with eight triumphs carrying the Power to seventh place. Their season was brought to an emphatic end at the hands of eventual premier Geelong, who beat them by 85 points in the first round of finals. Gippsland also won the reverse fixture between these two sides by 16 points in Round 17.

Featured Image: Mike Owen/AFL Media