Tag: sam banks

TSL scouting notes: North Launceston vs. Clarence

IN the first of two Tasmanian State League (TSL) pieces wrapping up the first week of finals, we took a look at the first against fourth clash between North Launceston and Clarence and some of the top stars out on display.

NORTH LAUNCESTON vs. CLARENCE

By: Peter Williams

Twelve consecutive goals to North Launceston reminded spectators at UTAS Stadium just what the reigning premiers were capable of as the Bombers rampaged to a whopping 78-point win over Clarence. The Roos were plucky early kicking the first two goals of the game through bottom-agers Darcy Gardner and Noah Holmes and then leading by as much as 13 points at one stage after Josh Green kicked his side’s third major. Many expected a North Launceston response, but no one expected a 12 goals to zero domination over the next three quarters – including five in the final term – to run out 15.8 (98) to 3.2 (20) winners.

Daniel Withers was electric up forward and got better as the game wore on booting five goals for the Bombers, whilst Tom Bennett (three goals) and Taylor Whitford (two) both hit the scoreboard. Brad Cox-Goodyer was best on ground kicking a goal and always looked lively, whilst Jack Avent (one), Arion Richter-Salter and Thomas Donnelly were also standouts. For the Roos, Zac Buechner, Ollie Davis and Gardner all tried hard, with Davis breaking through a tag to be a force on the inside, whilst unfortunately for the Roos, they just faded as experience took over.

North Launceston:

#16 Ollie Sanders

Had a classy game for the Bombers, spreading well and getting better as the match wore on. His work rate and repeat efforts to get to multiple stoppages was admirable and in particular he looked lively in the front half of the ground. Sanders’ third term was the busiest for the talent, working hard in the back pocket to win the ball, then pushing into the midfield having plenty of touches. He spread regularly and then did well early in that term to speed out of a stoppage and use the ball well by hand and get it back not long after in space. Overall he was impressive for the Bombers, finishing with 18 disposals, six marks, five clearances and two tackles.

#64 Baynen Lowe

Lowe loves the contested side of things and lays some fierce tackles. He showed some quick hands under pressure, and was able to get it out whilst being tackled early in the second term. After a quiet first term, Lowe worked into the game and used his pace and defensive pressure to unsettle the opposition. In the third quarter, Lowe had a couple of score assists and was involved in a handball chain down the wing then hit up a target inside 50. He took a strong mark 40m out later in the quarter but his shot went to the top of the square and was cleared. Another good effort was late in the final term, spoiling one-on-one then handballing off which led forward to another goal for the reigning premiers. All up, Lowe had four score involvements to go with his 18 disposals, two marks, two clearances and five tackles.

 

Clarence:

#20 Oliver Davis

The TSL Rising Star really came of age when he found North Launceston’s Ben Simpson walk up to him from the first bounce. Davis was tightly guarded by Simpson and afforded no space around the clearances, but like he tends to do, he just wears down his opponents. Davis might not have had the greatest impact he has had in games – he was being tightly held – but he never gives in and just throws himself at the ball and ball carrier and his work rate is enormous. With clean hands in congestion and always giving it a crack even with the mammoth deficit mounting, Davis kept trying and finished with 18 disposals – 11 contested – six tackles and three clearances.

#23 Sam Banks

The most lively of the Clarence young guns, Banks played in defence and tried to use his run and skills to break the lines. He took a strong contested one-on-one mark on the wing, and whilst he was often under pressure in defence, made the best of it. Had one weird, uncharacteristic turnover in defence that triggered a series of mistakes by both teams, and then copped a hip and shoulder from the goal umpire in a couple of minutes he would rather forget. He readjusted and and was able to try his heart out driving the ball long, though the North Launceston defence was set up well. By the final siren, Banks had 18 disposals, one mark, one tackle, two clearances and three score involvements.

#34 Noah Holmes

It was a lonely day to be a full-forward for Clarence after quarter time, with Holmes winning the majority of his four touches in the first term when the Roos looked lively. Had one of the highlights of the day with a goal off a step 50m out and kicked it with ease like it was a 15m pass. He moved into the ruck to start the fourth term, but ultimately like most of his teammates had a quiet outing with four disposals, two tackles, two score involvements, one hitout and one goal.

#39 Darcy Gardner

Symbolic of many Clarence players, Gardner tried hard but was ultimately overwhelmed by the experienced North Launceston midfield. He ran hard in the opening term on the transition to lose his opponent and mark 30m out to slot home the opening goal of the match. His first term was huge with a great tackle on an opponent to stop a clearance, and then pumped a raking ball in deep that travelled 60-odd metres. He was quieter after quarter time, finishing with 11 disposals, three marks, three tackles and four score involvements.

#46 Baker Smith

Saw plenty of the ball in defence, but had a tough day on Blake McCulloch. When he had the ball, Smith looked composed and showed he could close down his opponent with well timed spoils. Often he was starting scoring chains from defence, but had his hands full with his opponent. McCulloch missed a couple of chances, but Smith still held him to the one goal from eight touches and three marks, far from disgraced against a distinguished opponent. Smith also hurt himself landing a little awkwardly in the last term, finishing with six disposals, one mark, two tackles and three score involvements for the match.

Picture: Andrew Woodgate

TSL weekend preview: Semi finals – Youngsters loom as Northern Bombers’ finals wildcard

FINALS time has hit the Tasmanian State League (TSL), with two Saturday semi finals set to decide this year’s grand finalists. Minor premier, North Launceston takes on fourth-placed Clarence at UTAS Stadium, while Launceston (2nd, 9-3) meets with Lauderdale (3rd, 7-5) at Windsor Park, with both games bounce down at 2pm. We take a look at where some of the best Tasmanian youth prospects will line up this weekend, as the final four is trimmed to two.

>> SCROLL for full fixtures and teams

North Launceston could have a finals wildcard or two up its sleeve, with a couple of young Tasmania Devils guns entering the fold at team selection. The Northern Bombers have slotted bottom-ager Baynen Lowe straight back into the starting lineup at half-forward, with the diminutive ball winner set to provide a spark inside attacking 50. Oliver Sanders, who found the goals last week comes in on the bench, while bigman Jackson Callow looms as a massive returnee having been named as an emergency.

After edging out North Hobart to secure a finals spot, Clarence boasts arguably the competition’s best group of Under 18s, all of whom will be keen to impact on the big stage. Oliver Davis, Samuel Lewis-Johnson, and Sam Banks were all named among the Roos’ best last time out, while Noah Holmes and Darcy Gardner hit the scoreboard. Davis remains a crucial cog at the heart of midfield alongside Gardner and Ethan Jackson, while Banks will again provide class off half-back. Jacques Barwick and Lachlan Borsboom have been squeezed out to the emergency spots.

Clarence has given the highly-fancied Bombers side a good run on two occasions this season, going down by a combined 24 points in their Round 4 and 10 meetings. While the minor premiers have proven dominant in 2020, they cannot take anything for granted given the ruthless nature of this year’s knockout finals format.

In the weekend’s other fixture, Launceston and Lauderdale also duke it out for a spot in the Grand Final, with their head-to-head ledger sitting even at one win apiece in 2020. The Blues come in fresh off a bye, while Lauderdale will hope for an improved performance after sneaking home by just three points against Tigers in Round 13.

After being named among the best in Launceston’s last outing, Jared Dakin again takes up his spot in the side across half-back, while fellow Tasmania Devils representative Isaac Chugg has been named on the bench. Dakin’s work rate and toughness should suit the rigours of finals football, while Chugg’s speed could prove handy in helping break the game open. Meanwhile, Samuel Foley comes out of the side after a sole senior outing. For Lauderdale, Sam Tilley again lines up inside forward 50, while Oscar Shaw takes up his spot in defence. Tilley was among the Bombers’ best last week, so should prove a dangerous outlet.

>> FULL TSL SEMI FINALS TEAMS

Fixtures:

Saturday, October 10:

North Launceston vs. Clarence | 2:00pm @ UTAS Stadium

Launceston vs. Lauderdale | 2:00pm @ Windsor Park

Featured Image: North Launceston’s Baynen Lowe | Credit: Simon Sturzaker/The Advocate

TSL scouting notes and wrap: Round 13 – Roos secure finals berth

ROUND 13 of the Tasmanian State League (TSL) saw some exciting players set the field alight and showcase their talents for their respective sides as Clarence won and Tiger lost for the former to secure a finals spot in the last round of the regular season.

Clarence 9.12 (66) defeated North Hobart 8.7 (55)

By: Peter Williams

Clarence locked up fourth spot and guaranteed the Roos finals thanks to a tight 11-point victory over North Hobart in a battle of the sides with an abundance of youth.

Clarence led at each change but it was by a kick of less at the breaks, holding a two-point, one-point and six-point lead at the first, second and third breaks. An inaccurate 1.5 in the final term extended the final margin out to 11, but they never entirely looked safe in the 9.12 (66) to 8.7 (55) victory.

Chris Nield was a standout coming back into the side kicking two goals, while Jason Bailey and Josh Green also kicked a couple each. Baker Smith was named his team’s best-on for his work in defence, with others youngsters Sam Banks and Oliver Davis also among the Roos’ best. For the Demons, Julian Dobosz, Angus Norton and Jye Menzie all kicked multiple goals, as Hugh Williams, Thomas Reeves and Jayden Charlton were named among the best.

Scouting notes:

By: Tom Cheesman

CLARENCE:

#20 Oliver Davis

Davis had a strong game through the midfield for Clarence. The slippery conditions made the match very congested, and this is a style of football that suits Davis well. He played predominantly on the inside where he gave some good handballs under pressure and laid some aggressive tackles. Davis won numerous contested possessions throughout the day and earned multiple free kicks by getting to the ball first and putting his head over it.

#23 Sam Banks

Banks showed that he has good skills and athleticism with some nice link-up play out of the defensive half on Saturday. His kicking was a highlight, as teammates continually looked to get the ball in his hands and he found short targets on a consistent basis. Banks has a fantastic work rate, as he always followed up his kicks and attempted to earn another possession in the same passage of play. A couple of times he did appear rushed under pressure, but this is understandable given that he is a young player. With more experience at League level, he should be able to find a bit more of the ball on the inside which will compliment his outside game beautifully.

#34 Noah Holmes

Holmes played a solid game as a key forward for the Roos. Early in the game, he linked up well down the wings and applied good body pressure with blocks and shepherds to create space for teammates. He took a strong one-on-one mark in the second quarter to earn a shot for goal, but unfortunately his kick was touched by the man on the mark. Holmes redeemed himself with a nice snap goal in the third term. He also showed some decent agility, particularly when he laid a chase down tackle to win a holding the ball decision in the third quarter.

#39 Darcy Gardner

Gardner was very impressive for Clarence in the midfield and as a half-forward. The under-ager displayed some brilliant work on the inside, highlighted by a burst through the middle of a stoppage to win a clearance in the second term. Gardner rarely fumbled, was clever with his hands and linked up very nicely with teammates through the middle of the ground. He often provided a lead-up option for teammates and initiated switches of play as well. Despite being smaller than most of his opponents, Gardner is a great competitor and is not afraid to compete against the bigger bodies, which was demonstrated when he laid a good tackle to win a holding the ball decision in second term. He also displayed some fantastic forward craft when he kicked a clever goal in the third term by side-stepping two opponents and then drilling the drop punt from about 35 metres out. Gardner played a pivotal role in his side’s 11-point victory.

#46 Baker Smith

Smith showed some fantastic signs on Saturday. Although he misread the flight of the ball a couple of times early, his performance from the second quarter onwards was outstanding. He took numerous intercept marks by dropping into holes and reading the leads of opposition forwards. Smith has great length, so he can cover lots of ground and is a reliable mark. Once he had the ball, the bottom-ager always looked for runners coming past to create some fast ball movement coming out of defence. Smith’s kicking was reliable too, particularly when he went short and switched the play.

NORTH HOBART:

#37 Sam Collins

Collins was one of North Hobart’s most reliable defenders on Saturday. He took numerous intercept marks in the defensive 50 by reading the play well, floating in front of leading forwards and using his strong hands. In the first quarter, Collins linked up with teammates across the wings to control possession and set up a goal with a nice long kick inside 50. Throughout the game he spread from defence well, rarely fumbled, hit most of his targets by foot and created a running option when his side was moving the ball forward. He had a great moment in third term where he pushed off his opponent, took an intercept mark, used pace to break away and then found a teammate with a beautifully weighted kick through the corridor. This led to an important goal and demonstrated how damaging Collins can be when he gets the ball in dangerous positions.

#46 Jye Menzie

Menzie kicked two goals on Saturday and showed some other good signs. He applied strong pressure on the opposition and regularly got into good positions to crumb marking contests. His ability to make something out of nothing was evident, particularly when he almost kicked an amazing goal with some soccer skills in second term. He pushed up the ground to collect touches and link-up with teammates whenever necessary, but he mostly played as a deep forward. Other highlights of his game were a brilliant run down tackle in second quarter that won a holding the ball decision and led to a goal, and an impressive overhead mark on the lead in third term.

 

North Launceston 17.11 (113) defeated Glenorchy 3.7 (25)

By: Fraser Stewart

An eight goals to none blitz in the first quarter set off a thumping win to the North Launceston Bombers as they finished on top of the ladder to claim the minor premiership as they look to continue their form into the final series.

It was a convincing performance from the Bombers with a wealth of players popping up and hitting the scoreboard in big way with multiple goals coming from Zachary Burt (four), Jack Rushton (three), Jack Avent (three), Bradley Cox-Goodyer (two), Taylor Whitford (two), William Edmunds (one goal), Sherrin Egger (one goal), and Ollie Sanders (one goal) all contributing to the 17.11(113) to 3.7(25) win.

Despite trailing by 12 goals at the last break Glenorchy did their best to make much of a contest in the fourth quarter but it was too little too as they only managed one goal in that term as they went down by 88 points.

NORTH LAUNCESTON

# 16 Ollie Sanders: 

Put in a terrific game right from the outset, although his first quarter was quiet he showed glimpses of what he was going to do all day when he linked up the play collecting a ground ball and lowering his eyes to hit a target inside 50. He was all over the ground often moving to the wing where he showed his calmness and agility when he collected a bouncing ball from an awkward bounce and weaved his way out of a tackle. He also made his way to defence to help the defenders out, showcasing he has a good football brain when he switched the play which led to an attacking play. But wherever he went he always seemed to get his hands on the pill often handballing it to create a link-up play or hitting targets lace out into space. He was often the starter of the attacking movements. 

GLENORCHY

#36 Charlie Thompson

He was a pretty quiet which was evident of North Launceston dominating all day on the park and on the scoreboard, but he did try to make things happen for Glenorchy, as he often went up for marks and went further upfield to help out in defence where he got most of his possessions. Despite not getting on the scoreboard, it should be noted that his second efforts were some of his biggest traits in the 88-point defeat. This was evident when dropped a mark (albeit a relatively hard one but got his hands on it nonetheless) but went to ground to try and reclaim the ball and created a contest out of it. He was lively in the last quarter when Glenorchy started to play with more fluency, he nearly had a goal to his name but was rushed by a North Launceston player, however, that alone should be encouraging for the full-forward as he found time and space (which he did not have for majority of the game) to get a shot away as he got the defenders off guard and finally got good service to him.

 

Lauderdale 8.13 (61) defeated Tigers 8.10 (58)

By: Peter Williams

In the battle between two more experienced sides, and Tigers needing a big win – and the Roos to lose – in order to make finals,- Lauderdale just got the job done and held firm to win by three points.

Tigers led at each break and looked likely to cause and upset throughout the contest, taking a four, seven and nine-point lead into each quarter, winning the first three terms. Unfortunately for the visitors, they could only score two behinds in the final quarter as Lauderdale booted 2.2 to snatch victory from the jaws of defeat and win 8.13 (61) to 8.10 (58)

Harry Richmond slotted four goals for the Bombers – including the matchwinner midway through the final term, as he was named among the best with Luke Nelson (two goals) and Josh McGuinness (one). Sam Siggins and Nathan Oakes also stood out for Lauderdale, as Toutea Havea was the other solitary goalkicker in the match. For Tigers, Oliver Burrows-Cheng (two goals) was the only multiple goalkicker as he, Kieren Lovell (one), Luke Graham (one), Marcus Davies (one) and William Campbell were all steadfast in defeat.

Picture: Solstice Digital & Photography

TSL weekend preview: Round 13 – Last finals spot on the line

THE ULTIMATE round of the Tasmanian State League (TSL) home-and-away season is set to take part on a super Saturday, with final ladder positions all but sewn up. Clarence kicks off proceedings looking to consolidate fourth spot when it takes on North Hobart, as Tigers clip at the Roos’ heels. The Tigers face stiff opposition in Lauderdale, though, while North Launceston takes on Glenorchy in a first-versus-last meeting. We take a look at where some of the best Tasmanian youth prospects will line up this weekend, as the finals race is decided.

>> SCROLL for full fixtures and teams

Leading bottom-age prospect Sam Banks comes into Clarence’s lineup this week, slotting in off half-back to join a host of young guns in the starting side. Oliver Davis is again at the heart of midfield, while Darcy Gardner will rotate off the bench after once more being named among his side’s best last week. The Roos’ team also features the likes of Noah Holmes, who starts at full forward, and on-ball starter Ethan Jackson.

The Roos’ opponent, North Hobart also lays claim to a bunch of young talent, even without the injured Patrick Walker. Sam Collins is coming off a solid display last round and takes up his usual place at centre half-back, alongside Tyler McGinniss. Will Peppin jumps back into the starting frame this week on a wing, with Jye Menzie up forward once again after a one-goal game, Bigman Hamish Allan is set to miss, while Jake Steele has been named as an emergency.

Baynen Lowe is out of the North Launceston side after two goals last week, one of three changes for the Northern Bombers. Oliver Sanders, who was named in the best alongside Lowe remains on the wing as the minor premiers look to round out their regular season on a high. They face Glenorchy, who are still in with a chance of climbing out of bottom spot. Among those up against it in the fight is 19-year-old Ryan Banks-Smith, named on the Magpies’ centreline after a promising outing in Round 12.

The final game of the weekend, and minor season sees Lauderdale take on Tigers, with the latter hoping to sneak into finals. Ranked third and coming off a bye round, Lauderdale boasts the likes of Oscar Shaw (back pocket) and bottom-ager Sam Tilley (forward pocket) up either end of the ground. The Tigers have made two changes, with defender Lachlan Gadomski among them, though Riley Ashlin and Oliver Burrows-Cheng both feature, with the latter starting on-ball.

>> FULL TSL ROUND 13 TEAMS

Fixtures:

Saturday, October 3:

Clarence vs. North Hobart | 11:30pm @ Richmond Oval

North Launceston vs. Glenorchy | 1:40pm @ UTAS Stadium

Lauderdale vs. Tigers | 2:00pm @ Lauderdale Oval

Bye: Launceston

Featured Image: Sam Banks in action for Clarence | Source: Solstice Digital

Scouting notes: SATIS Grand Final – Guilford Young vs. St Patricks

IN a come-from-behind victory, Guilford Young won its first Sports Association of Tasmanian Independent Schools (SATIS) in 18 years, defeating regular winners, St Patricks who had claimed seven of the past nine titles. In our scouting notes from the game, we look at some of the Tasmanian Devils prospects who stood out, the majority of whom are bottom-agers and will hope to have an impact in the NAB League or Tasmanian State League (TSL) next year.

GUILFORD YOUNG:

#1 Darcy Gardner

One of the best on the day, Gardner just has a crack every time he is out on the field. You know what to expect from the Clarence youngster and he showed it in the win against St Patricks. Whilst at times he can blast away by foot with his determination to win the ball and get it forward – playing a more contested role – his short kicking is quite neat, and it showed with a lovely lace-out kick to Noah Holmes in the third term, even though Holmes was spoiled on that occasion. He had a chance to score himself with a quick kick, but it went too far to the right and bounce through for a behind. Despite being a smaller player, Gardner has good strength in the contest and is able to shrug off opponents, with not too dissimilar traits to Clarence teammate, Oliver Davis.

Gardner finished with 21 disposals (13 contested), four clearances, six tackles and seven inside 50s.

#3 Oliver Davis

It was interesting to watch Davis around the stoppages as he rarely had too much time and space, often tackled by multiple opponents. As Guilford Young’s captain, it hardly fazed him, firing out handballs from congestion to teammates on the outside and they benefited from his work. You know what to expect from the AFL Academy member, and he did just that. On a number of occasions he was able to hit up teammates inside 50, first to Lachlan Rowlands – who missed – then Lincoln Arnold – who goaled – but his best passage of play was an elite clearance to Holmes leading out in the last 90 seconds of the game to hand his full-forward back-to-back goals in the space of a minute. Occasionally he was done for doing a bit too much, caught close to the boundary line by Michael Stingel in the second term, and then went too high with the tackle on opposing captain Bailey Gillow in the last quarter, but the subsequent shot of the latter sprayed to the right.

Davis worked hard for 16 disposals – at 93 per cent efficiency – of which 10 were contested. He also had five clearances, three inside 50s and two tackles.

#5 George McLeod

Has some nice traits to his game, as well as great versatility. Seemingly the bottom-ager can play in any third of the ground, and his work off half-back and down a wing certainly provides good run for his teammates. He won his fair share of clearances when he went on-ball, and got better as the game went on, showing clean hands time and time again. McLeod was also strong in the air, taking an important intercept mark at half-back in the final term, and remained active, roaming between the arcs.

McLeod finished with 24 disposals, six marks, three clearances, three inside 50s and five rebounds, recording a disposal efficiency of 66 per cent.

#10 Sam Banks

The Tasmanian Most Valuable Player (MVP) at last year’s Under 16s Championships, Banks brought his own ball to the game. While his second quarter was a little quiet, his first, third, and particularly fourth terms were very busy. When the game was on the line, he was continually involved, and his slick handballs or disposals to cut inboard and slice open the defence were handy. He uses the ball well and actually ran at 50 per cent contested rate, sharing his work in close as well as his preferred outside. He had a couple of chances at goal but could not quite register a major, and at one stage did a bit too much at half-forward and was brought down by Khai Lunson. Overall though, the positives stuck out for the major ball winner who had a day out through midfield and benefited from a high work rate across the field.

Banks amassed a game-high 34 disposals (73 per cent efficiency), 17 of which were contested, as well as six marks, six clearances and six inside 50s.

#20 Noah Holmes

The Clarence bottom-ager was the match-winner, coming alive in the second half to slam home five goals. Always looking threatening, something clicked from the fifth minute of the third quarter. In the opening half, Holmes had been okay without being dominant, taking a couple of great marks, but missed three set shots to end the half at 0.3. Two minutes into the second half, Holmes was found trailing his defender in Sam Foley, of whom the latter marked uncontested. From that point on, the key forward would not be beaten again. He kicked his first three minutes later off the back of a strong contested grab 30m out from goal. He tried to assist in a couple of goals to Davis and Banks, but the first pass was one handball too many, and the second was a snap and miss by Banks. Instead, with two minutes left, he clunked a massive contested mark against two opponents on the goalline to go back and pop through his second, and then 30 seconds later, led out and marked off the elite clearance work of Davis. Suddenly his side was in front and he had three consecutive goals. The fourth term started like his third term had ended, with another contested grab six minutes in just 15m out, too big and strong for his opponent. His fifth game 13 minutes into the term against two opponents as he nudged one forward and leant back on the other to take it cleanly and nail the set shot from 20m out.

Holmes finished with 14 touches – nine kicks for 5.3 – as well as eight marks – six contested – in a match-winning performance and clear best on ground.

#21 Sam Collins

Did not see a lot of ball in the opening term because it was up the other end, but showed some good signs with a great tackle to save a charge on goal, then a long kick out of defence. That might have been turned over, but his kicking improved more in the second term, winning the ball more consistently. In the third term, Collins came across with a huge spoil at half-back to cleanly punch the ball out of bounds, backing up from an earlier tackle on the wing that forced a turnover. His intercept mark in the opening 30 seconds of the final term was also a highlight, whilst he finished strongly in the final term, using the ball well out of defence.

Collins finished with 20 disposals at 70 per cent efficiency, but nearly all were uncontested. He showed great determination with four one percenters, as well as six rebounds.

#25 Baker Smith

Much like Holmes up the other end, the tall defender was just too big and strong, and had enough of a leap to read the ball in flight and clunk a number of contested marks. In the opening term alone, he took three intercept marks and it was beginning to look like the opposition was pinpointing him at half-back. He lost his cool in the second term for a front-on tackle on Angus Jeffries, told the umpire that he may have been mistaken in his decision to award the free kick, and then gave away a 50m for his feedback. It was about his only blemish of the day though, as he went back to being a strong interceptor and booming kick, and even had a set shot late in the third term. It was marked on the line by Holmes who finished off the job, but Smith was solid all day in defence.

Smith ended the game with 16 disposals, six marks – four contested – four inside 50s and two rebounds with his 43 per cent disposal efficiency not indicative of his work given most of his kicks were sent long out of the danger zone.

ST PATRICK’S:

#1 Oliver Sanders

Worked hard throughout the game and always looked lively through the middle and forward 50. A kick-first midfielder with 22 kicks and just one handball, Sanders was able to remain busy throughout the game, often out of a stoppage or in the forward half. He had a quick snap late in the second term but just missed to the right, and then a second chance in the final term but his shot just drifted away. While at times he might have rushed his disposals, he worked hard to find space and link up in St Patrick’s transition and finish with the second most touches, and most marks of anyone on his side. He also was instrumental around the clearances and would have some of the higher GPS numbers on the day.

Sanders finished with 23 disposals, eight marks – one contested – six clearances, five inside 50s and four rebounds.

#6 Angus Jeffries

The prominent ball winner on the day and St Patrick’s best, Jeffries put together a four-quarter performance. He won touches from the get-go and was crashing in on the inside, often shovelling handballs out of congestion or clearing it quickly by foot. Despite running at a 50 per cent contested rate, Jeffries still hit most of his targets, and laid plenty of tackles in the process. Not afraid to cop contact, he put his head over the ball in the second term, copped front-on contact from Baker Smith, received a 50m penalty and kicked a goal from point-blank range. He had a set shot from 40m in the final term after being slung to the ground, but it just missed to the left.

Jeffries finished with 24 touches – at 70 per cent efficiency – six marks, seven clearances, six tackles, two inside 50s and one goal.

#11 Sam Foley

Had a tough day at the office in defence, often being the third-up in front of Holmes, or trying to intercept when it came down there. Given Holmes has about 12cm and 14kg on him, the reliable defender was definitely out of his weight class. But he ended the game as one of the best for St Patrick’s, never giving in and proving to be a prominent defender. Finishing with an equal team-high five rebounds, Foley was not afraid to put himself in the hole, or try and come over and assist his teammates.

Foley finished with 12 disposals, four marks, five rebounds and three tackles.

#17 Zachary Morris

Named among the best, the medium forward was solid and lively inside 50. He was slick with ball-in-hand, finishing with a number of contested marks. Despite standing at about 186cm, Morris is able to cleanly take grabs above his head and then hit up targets inside 50. His goal in the game came five minutes into the match with some clever thinking courtesy of a quick snap at the top of the goalsquare. He worked hard throughout the day and remains one to watch for the Devils next year.

Morris claimed 12 disposals – at 75 per cent efficiency – five marks – three contested – two inside 50s and a goal.

Clarence bottom-agers steer Guilford Young to first SATIS title in 18 years

CLARENCE bottom-age talents, Noah Holmes, Sam Banks and Darcy Gardner have dominated the Sports Association of Tasmanian Independent Schools (SATIS) Grand Final, steering their school Guilford Young College to a memorable come-from-behind 22-point victory over St Patrick’s College at Twin Ovals, the college’s first title since 2002.

Whilst St Patrick’s was missing bustling key forward and co-captain Jackson Callow, Guilford Young was also without fellow AFL Draft Combine invitee and Academy member Patrick Walker. It meant the remaining AFL Academy members – Oliver Davis, Sam Collins and Banks – ran out for the winners, while a host of developing talents including Holmes, North Hobart’s George McLeod, and Clarence’s Baker Smith also impressed in the win. For St Patrick’s the players to watch coming into the match were Oliver Sanders and Isaac Hyatt who had both had impressive showings at Tasmanian State League (TSL) level lately.

Despite not possessing the majority of state league talent and missing Callow as a target up forward, it was St Patrick’s that took an early lead into quarter time. Guilford Young owned forward half possession, but missed a few chances and it took until Lincoln Arnold kicked a great goal off the hands of Davis to register the first major of the game. Six minutes later, Declen Chugg put through a running goal and his effort was matched 90 seconds later by captain Bailey Gillow who made no mistake.

The Hobart-based side came out firing early in the second term as Lachlan Rowlands capitalised from the set shot, but it was all St Patricks from there. The green and gold side piled on four of the next five goals, with Chugg kicking a second, while Oliver Chugg, Zach Morris and Angus Jeffries all capitalised with majors. Only ruckman playing the role of rover, Ryan Hapka managed to get one against the momentum, roving Holmes’ marking contest in the square midway through the term to capitalise with quick thinking.

Trailing by 14 points at half-time, Guilford Young needed something special, and that someone was Holmes who booted five of the last six goals of the game. The bottom-age contested marking specialist missed a few chances in the first half, but he was kicking them from everywhere in the second, as he and Arnold (second goal) made the opposition pay. His five goals proved a match winner and he was clearly the best on ground to help Guilford Young to its first SATIS title in 18 years.

Holmes finished with 14 disposals, eight marks – six contested – and 5.3 on the day, with Banks racking up a ridiculous 34 disposals, six marks, six clearances and six inside 50s. Gardner also impressed with 21 touches, four clearances, six tackles and seven inside 50s, while McLeod played a consistent four-quarter game with 24 disposals, six marks – one contested – three clearances, three inside 50s and five rebounds. Smith proved a rock down back with multiple intercept marks (six total, four contested), as well as 16 touches, four inside 50s and two rebounds. Davis worked hard and was often gang-tackled on the inside to finish with 16 disposals, five clearances, three inside 50s and two tackles.

For St Patrick’s, Jeffries was busy with 24 disposals, six marks, seven clearances, two inside 50s and a goal as the losing side’s best, while Sanders helped himself to 23 disposals, eight marks, six clearances, five inside 50s and four rebounds. Sam Foley tried hard in defence often getting in Holmes’ way to pick up 12 disposals, four marks, five rebounds and three tackles. Morris had 12 disposals, five marks – three contested – two inside 50s and a goal for the losers, while Michael Stringel (10 disposals, four inside 50s and three tackles) was also impressive.

GUILFORD YOUNG 1.2 | 3.6 | 6.8 | 9.9 (63)
ST PATRICKS 2.0 | 6.2 | 6.2 | 6.5 (41)

GOALS: 

Guilford Young: N. Holmes 3, L. Arnold, L. Rowlands, R. Hapka.
St Patrick’s: D. Chugg, B. Gillow, A. Jeffries, Z. Morris, O. Chugg, D. Chugg.

ADC BEST:

Guilford Young: N. Holmes, S. Banks, D. Gardner, G. McLeod, B. Smith
St Patrick’s: A. Jeffries, M. Stingel, Z. Morris, S. Foley, O. Sanders

TSL weekend preview: Round 10 – Top four square off in finals-defining weekend

ROUND 10 of the 2020 TSL got underway on Wednesday, as Tigers got one over North Hobart with a tight four-point win. The likes of Sam Collins, Jye Menzie, and Jake Steele could not quite help drag the Demons home, but a host of other Tasmanian young guns will be hoping to go one better as they get on the park. We take a look at where the best Tasmanian youth prospects will line up this weekend.

>> SCROLL for full fixtures

In a quirk which looks set to make for an incredible set of fixtures, the current top four clubs will battle it out against fellow finals-bound teams on Saturday, with fifth-placed Glenorchy waiting in the wings for the opportunity to get back into finals contention. The Magpies take on Tigers in Sunday’s lone match, with the latter coming in off a four-day break.

While bigman Jackson Callow has not been named for Launceston (2nd, 7-1), the Bombers will count themselves in with a good chance of knocking off Clarence (4th, 4-4) with the home side also missing a bunch of promising youngsters. Top-age AFL Academy gun Oliver Davis and Under 16 Division 2 MVP Sam Banks are both set to instead line up for Guilford Young College in the SATIS Football Grand Final on Saturday, a game which will see plenty more Tasmania Devils representatives in action. Banks’ Under 16s teammate Baynen Lowe will lineup for the Bombers in midfield, though.

Ladder leader Launceston (7-2) travels to face Lauderdale (3rd, 4-4), boasting arguably the best two draft relevant talents in the TSL this weekend. 19-year-old Jared Dakin lines up at half-back for the Blues, while athletic top-ager Isaac Chugg takes his place on the wing. Oscar Shaw, a NAB League teammate of the pair in 2019, has been named on Lauderdale’s bench, while Eastern Ranges product Adrian Kalcovski starts at half-forward.

Having already run out in a mid-week fixture, North Hobart is listed for the bye round this week. Demons prospect Patrick Walker is done for the season through injury.

TSL ROUND 10 FIXTURES:

Saturday, September 12:
Clarence vs. North Launceston | 1:30pm @ Richmond Oval
Lauderdale vs. Launceston | 2:00pm @ Lauderdale Oval

Sunday, September 13:
Glenorchy vs. Tigers | 1:00pm @ KGV

TSL scouting notes and wrap: Round 9 – Top two make statement

TASMANIAN State League (TSL) heavyweights, Launceston and North Launceston have enjoyed huge wins in Round 9 of the competition, having more than 30 scoring shots to all but lock up the top two spots with four rounds remaining. Clarence had a crucial 20-point win over Lauderdale in the other game to draw level in equal third, whilst the Demons and Tigers – who had the bye on the weekend – require more than just their own results in order to make finals.

In the Clarence-Lauderdale clash, the Roos’ fast start of three goals to one in the first term got them on the right path, and then led by the same 18-point margin at half-time. By the final break, Clarence was out to a 34-point lead, and whilst the Bombers kicked a few late goals to in the final term, still went down 11.14 (80) to 9.6 (60).

Josh Green snagged three goals in the win showing his AFL experience, while James Holmes (two goals from 10 touches and six marks) and Darcy Gardner (19 disposals, two goals) were also prolific. Gardner, Sam Banks, Oliver Davis and Noah Holmes all feature in our Clarence scouting notes. For the Bombers, Josh McGuinness notched up a match-high 30 disposals, as well as five clearances and nine inside 50s, while Sam Siggins had 29 touches and five clearances.

The reigning premiers put the young Demons to the sword in a 56-point victory down south, winning 11.20 (86) to 4.6 (30). It was a one-sided contest for the most part, with North Launceston’s inaccuracy the only thing keeping a Demons side missing the in-form Patrick Walker (calf, season) in the match. A five goals to one second half put an exclamation mark on the performance, with young talent Ollie Sanders named his side’s best, notching up 15 disposals at 80 per cent efficiency, and booting two goals.

Daniel Withers was also impressive with a couple of goals from 14 touches, as Sanders and Jackson Callow (seven disposals, three marks) feature in our scouting notes. For the Demons, Sam Collins had a breakout performance with 25 disposals, five marks and 11 rebounds, often opposed to Callow and doing well in the one-on-ones, as he was one young gun who stood out, while Hugh Williams (17 disposals, eight marks and six rebounds) was nominated as the Demons’ best.

In the final game of the round, Launceston remained on top of the table with a 97-point shellacking of Glenorchy. Jake Harper had one of the matches of the season, bringing his own ball to Windsor Park to rack up 38 disposals, 13 marks, 10 clearances, 12 inside 50s and 3.3 in a far and away best on ground performance for the Blues. Dylan Riley kicked 3.3 from 16 disposals and 10 marks, while Jared Dakin features in our scouting notes alongside Isaac Chugg and Isaac Hyatt. For the Magpies, it was a disappointing results, but Daniel Joseph (23 disposals, three inside 50s, four rebounds) and Josh Arnold (31 disposals, four marks and nine rebounds) tried hard all day.

TSL ROUND 9 RESULTS:

Clarence 11.14 (80) defeated Lauderdale 9.6 (60)
North Hobart 4.6 (30) defeated by North Launceston 11.20 (86)
Launceston 17.16 (118) defeated Glenorchy 3.3 (21)

SCOUTING NOTES:

Sam Banks (Clarence)

Tasmania’s top prospect for 2021 had one of his better games for the year, racking up some big numbers across the ground and working into the game more and more as it went on. He continually showed clean hands and has the nice balance of skill and athleticism that sees him hard to match up on. A couple of times he can get knocked off the ball a little easy – as he is quite light – but if he is in a foot race, expect him to win more often than not. His closing speed – such as in the second term on the wing – saw him spoil a ball, keep it in and then move forward with a nice handball, then second effort after not receiving the one-two, to present again, receive and kick long was admirable. In the final term, Banks pick-pocketed an opponent and settled the team down with a couple of handballs, and almost kicked a goal with a highlight-reel sidestep and long-range shot from 50m, but it was unfortunately marked on the line. He finished with 21 disposals – at 71 per cent efficiency – seven inside 50s and four rebounds.

Jackson Callow (North Launceston)

After a best on ground performance in defence last week, Callow found himself back in his usual forward 50 spot, as the Bombers tried to isolate him deep at times on the smaller-framed Collins. Callow did what you would expect of him, leading hard, clunking grabs and laying some fierce tackles. He had a few spoiled marks due to the high calibre of his opposition, but kicked his sole goal for the day when one-on-one in the square he literally tossed Collins aside and dove for a mark. His shot for the goalsquare went straight through the middle, and came after a couple of misses which is uncharacteristic for the usually reliable set shot talent. His great pickup five minutes into the game at ground level to give off a goal to Jay Foon was superb, but unfortunately his match ended a couple of minutes later when he landed awkwardly and had to be helped off.

Isaac Chugg (Launceston)

Having returned to the side in the last few weeks, Chugg is an interesting prospect. Boasting some elite athletic traits, he had some inconsistent performances playing as a winger, but has slotted into half-back like a dream. He is not a huge ball winner – in fact he only had nine touches on the weekend – but the majority were intercept or metres-gained possessions. In other words, you notice him nearly every time he gets it. He reads the play well in flight, has great closing speed and equally well-balanced offensive and defensive traits. On a number of occasions he would lay some strong tackles, or provide pressure to force a turnover, and he has lightning quick hands to keep the ball moving. One of his highlights was an intercept mark on the defensive side of the wing going back with the flight, showing his courage. He might have only had the nine touches, two marks, three tackles and two rebounds, but went at 88 per cent disposal efficiency which comes as no surprise.

Sam Collins (North Hobart)

Earned top billing as the best Tasmanian draft prospect this week and stepped up in the absence of fellow talented teenager, Patrick Walker. He was stationed in his usual defensive post, and often against another Devil in Callow, who he played well one-on-one. Knowing he would not win in a wrestle, Collins would often concede Callow front position on the lead and then use his closing speed and vertical leap to cleanly spoil. While Callow’s vice like grip can be difficult to spoil, Collins just had to make perfectly timed spoils, which he did. He racked up the ball with ease and played probably his best game of the year with greater composure than usual and less errors by foot. A number of times he was able to spoil Callow and then win the ground ball to clear out of defence. In the one time he was caught in a wrestle, he was thrown out of the contest given the size he gave up, but overall took the points, finishing with 25 disposals – at 72 per cent efficiency – as well as five marks and 11 rebounds.

Jared Dakin (Launceston)

Another prominent game by the over-age midfielder who plays a consistent brand of footy week-in, week-out. Buzzing around the ground, Dakin was able to use his quick hands out of the stoppage to keep the ball moving and he finds space with ease. He possesses a long kick when required, but is more effective by foot over short distances. What he did well in Launceston’s massive win, was setting up a couple of goals in the final term to Harper and Jake Hinds, and picking the right options going forward. He had a quick snap just six minutes into the game but missed to the right, and even though he went goalless for the game, the inside midfielder never stopped trying and brought teammates into the match brilliantly to finish with 18 touches.

Oliver Davis (Clarence)

If we are talking about consistency week-in, week-out, it is hard to look past the brutal consistency and matchplay that the Devils’ top-age bull Davis plays at for Clarence every weekend. He has no trouble finding the ball around the ground, gets to the right spots and attacks it hard. He reads the ruck taps exceptionally well and has quick hands to fire out to teammates on the outside. Occasionally he might get done for holding the ball because he has dived head first to win it at round level, but then on other occasions – such as late in the second term – charges through a pack and delivers lace out to Noah Holmes on the lead. In fact, Holmes was a recipient of a number of Davis’ passes and some of his game play reminded me of Luke Ball with his hardness at the contest and his ability to read the game faster than others and deliver with neat, short passes. His tackling pressure is not to be questioned either, with just his rushed kicks out of a stoppage or when under pressure the area he continues to develop. As a whole, his 17 disposals, six clearances and three inside 50s comes as no surprise and he had another impressive game for the red and whites.

Darcy Gardner (Clarence)

Not turning 17 until November, Gardner had a real breakout performance against Lauderdale and was named his side’s best in the win. What stands out about Gardner is his ability to have a crack throughout four quarters, bring teammates into the game, but then also make the most of his chances. Both his goals – one in the second term and one in the third term – came from long set shots which he had to go back and nail with composure. His goalkicking routine was great, and on a couple of occasions, he backed himself in and ran down the middle. In some ways, Gardner has a similar attack on the ball to Davis, and is able to shrug off opponents despite standing at just 175cm. He spent most of his time forward in the second half, but his first half was a crucial reason why Clarence got off to a flyer, and picked up most of his 19 disposals, three clearances, three tackles and six inside 50s in that time.

Noah Holmes (Clarence)

A contested marking beast who shows similar signs to that of Callow, Holmes is a little shorter at around 192cm, but hard to move with a big frame and elite hands. He took a whopping six contested marks – not a typo – from seven total, from just nine touches. That in itself shows what he offers to a side, as a leading target on the end of a neat pass going inside 50. He works hard up the ground at times, but it is his ability to cleanly grab marks – including three consecutive contested marks within six minutes in the final term – that makes him such a damaging prospect. He only kicked the 1.3, so could have capitalised a lot more, with the three he missed easier chances than the one he got. Two of his behinds came in the first half from regulation set shots, and another from a tight angle in the last term, but it was his third quarter goal 13 minutes in that had the crowd up and about. In front of his fan club, Holmes snapped a goal from an impossible angle that sailed home under pressure which showed what he is capable of at ground level.

Isaac Hyatt (Launceston)

Making his debut for the Blues, the 16-year-old showed some serious talent and considering the strength of the Launceston line-up, you have to have a fair bit of that to make the side. He showed some clean hands early in the match and worked into the game, playing in the forward half and at times was a little too unselfish, passing off to teammates. He worked well with Chugg at half-forward for a quick one-two and kick to a leading forward, then had a huge final term. Taking multiple shots at goal, he kept getting on the wrong side for his left boot, missing a couple of set shots from the pocket with his Under 18s teammates trying to will him on from the boundary. He had a legitimate chance for goal 15 minutes in on the run but dribbled it towards Dakin who gave it to Hinds to finish off. On the 18th minute mark, and after several deliberate tries from his teammates to get him a goal, Hyatt marked on the correct side for his left boot, and a much better angle. Coming in from 40m, Hyatt drilled the goal and they ran from everywhere to celebrate, especially given the result was well beyond doubt.

Jye Menzie (North Hobart)

Menzie’s form mirrors that of North Hobart’s, having started the season really strongly, but due to lack of supply in recent weeks and the return of big man, Julian Dobosz, Menzie has not been as prominent on the scoresheet. He tries hard all game, but lacked his usual flair with just the nine touches, one mark and a couple of inside 50s. His best work comes off the deck, showing a clean pair of hands, but had a couple of highlights including an intercept mark midway through the first term to set up a rare Demons goal to Williams, and then charging down the middle with a deep kick to a dangerous area in the fourth term.

Ollie Sanders (North Launceston)

A lively player who works within his abilities, Sanders was one of the Bombers better players on the day using his slick skills and high impact per possession up forward. Sanders does not need a lot of the ball to have an impact, but he still amassed 15 disposals, three marks, two inside 50s and kicked a couple of goals. In the 10th minute of the first term, Sanders nailed a set shot from a great mark inside 50 and never looked like missing. In the second quarter, the top-age talent finished off perfectly in play with a nice left foot goal 15 minutes into the term. He pushed up the ground and even found touches in defence, covering the ground well with a high work rate.

Callum Thompson (Glenorchy)

It was not a great day for the Magpies who lost four key players prior to the bounce, but the bottom-ager remains an eye-catching prospect over the next couple of years. He set up a goal to Ethan Conway early in the match with a quick kick off the left, and then hit up Tom Cleary whose set shot unfortunately missed early in the second term. His long driving boot inside 50 was a feature of the match, and he has the game smarts to tap the ball forward in the path of a teammate instead of taking possession. In his bright boots, Thompson showed a real hardness at the contest, with clean hands at ground level and and ability to win the ball between the arcs.

Picture: Andrew Woodgate

TSL weekend preview: Round 9 – Form Devils to face off

AFTER their respective Round 8 performances, Tasmania Devils talents, Patrick Walker and Jackson Callow come into Round 9 as two of the in-form players. Their sides, North Hobart and North Launceston go head-to-head in a last chance saloon effort for the Demons, and a chance to extend their lead in the top two for the Bombers.

In Saturday’s win over Lauderdale, Walker had a best-on performance for the Demons, picking up 14 disposals at 50 per cent contested, whilst maintaining a solid 57 per cent disposal efficiency. While his disposal count is usually a lot higher, his ability to get down and win the contested ball was a plus, also picking up four clearances and having five inside 50s, spending much more time on the inside.

For Callow, he has had an extended break since last Wednesday night’s win over Launceston. The key position forward has slowly developed into a key position utility, and spent the entire Round 8 match in defence. He was a star back there, racking up 19 disposals, but clunking nine marks – four contested – having four rebounds and three tackles and well as four one percenters.

These two will not go head-to-head in a one-on-one, but are equally crucial to their team’s hopes. Callow could find himself standing on another Devils teammate in Jake Steele, while Walker will likely match up on an experienced Bombers midfielder. If one of them can have a big game, it could be crucial to the team’s chances. North Launceston will start as deserving favourites, but way back in Round 1, the Demons pushed them all the way coming off a wooden spoon last season and with backs against the wall, do not expect North Hobart to go down easily.

Patrick Walker (North Hobart)

Height: 186cm
Weight: 80kg

AFL Draft Watch

Last year: Averaged 16.5 disposals, 3.8 marks, 5.4 rebounds and 2,2 tackles for the Devils in the NAB League playing off half-back.

This year: Has been used in a multitude of roles for the Demons from half-back to wing to half-forward and last week, onball.

Player summary: Walker is traditionally a heavily outside-oriented player with good skills and high upside. He knows how to move the ball and can do some damage, but the next step for him was improving his inside game, which he started to last week.

Jackson Callow (North Launceston)

Height: 196cm
Weight: 90kg

AFL Draft Watch
TSL Player focus

Last year: The key position forward averaged 13.6 disposals, 6.0 marks, 1.5 inside 50s, and 1.7 goals per game (24 total) for the Devils in the NAB League.

This year: After starting the year as a key forward, Callow has spent time in defence for a quarter here or there, and last round played the full game at centre half-back where he excelled.

Player summary: Callow was a dominant key forward in the NAB League last season and started that way in the TSL in 2020. His move to defence has been a revelation because versatility was one area he could take his game to another level, already possessing the strongest hands in the game being an elite contested mark and reliable kick for goal.

In other games this weekend, Clarence takes on Lauderdale and Launceston takes on Glenorchy. The fourth placed Clarence can catch up to third placed Lauderdale with a win in what is a massive clash for both sides in their aims of playing finals. The same can be said for Glenorchy who have picked up in the last few weeks, but now take on the top of the table Blues. Launceston is going toe-to-toe with reigning premiers North Launceston at the top of the table, and cannot afford to slip up given the Bombers have a game in hand.

Clarence has a number of bottom-age AFL Draft prospects to look for led by 2019 Under 16s Championships Division 2 Most Valuable Player (MVP), Sam Banks. Possessing great skills and athletic traits, Banks is a barometer for the Roos who can really get them going. After a quiet game last week, the running winger and half-back will be keen to have an impact against the Bombers. Also in the bottom-age category of draft prospects are hulking key forward, Noah Holmes – who shows similar traits to Callow as a strong marking forward – talented outside mover Darcy Gardner, and strong tall defender Baker Smith.

The Roos also have a clear standout in his top-age year with hardnut Oliver Davis a prominent player onball. His work at the stoppages, particularly his quick hands and contested ball winning ability is a feature of his game, and he just has a crack for four quarters which fans love to see. Looking at Lauderdale, and Nick Baker is one who has shown signs over the past couple of years, and while he might be turning 20 in November, he has always been there about with his footy IQ, kicking and positioning among his strengths, while been working on his athletic capabilities. Adrian Kalcovski is a former Eastern Ranges product who only turned 20 at the start of the year. Capable of playing as a midfielder – as he did at the Ranges – or as a forward for the Bombers, the mature-age player has always been a natural ball-winner with some smarts around goal.

For Launceston, Jared Dakin is the one to watch for the Blues, having played a number of defensive roles this season. He has no trouble finding the ball himself, which makes him perfect for odd jobs here and there because he can shut down an opponent and also hurt them offensively. Against the Bombers last week he played forward and looked lively, then had a day out against the Tigers with 19 disposals at 73 per cent efficiency, five marks, three clearances, four inside 50s, two rebounds and a goal in a big win. The other Blues talent to watch who is more raw, is Isaac Chugg who had the eight touches, four marks and one rebound, but it is his impact-per-possession that can often hurt teams. He ran at 75 per cent efficiency, and possesses an elite 20m speed (2.93 seconds) and agility score (8.04 seconds). Those traits alone along with his skill has earned him consideration this year.

The Tigers have a more experienced line-up on hand, and a couple of AFL experienced players in Kieran Lovell and Mackenzie Willis, who unfortunately were unable to save the TSL’s bottom-placed side from a heavy loss against the Blues. Considering the appeal for mature-age draftees in a compromised draft year, clubs might consider the former two-game Hawk who is also a former Tasmanian MVP and All-Australian at Under 18s level. Lovell is too good for state level, racking up 20 disposals and seven clearances in the loss last round, which came off a lazy 28 disposals, nine clearances and inside 50s the week before.

TSL ROUND 9 FIXTURES:

Clarence vs. Lauderdale
North Hobart vs. North Launceston
Launceston vs. Glenorchy

Scouting notes and match wraps: TSL – Round 8

THE final three matches of Round 8 action completed on the weekend with Glenorchy and Lauderdale bouncing back with important wins, while Launceston took out its frustrations from the loss to North Launceston with a 96-point shellacking of last placed Tigers.

Glenorchy 12.9 (81) defeated Clarence 7.10 (52)

Glenorchy claimed a vital win in their hopes for finals this season with a 39-point triumph over Clarence. The matched ebbed and flowed throughout the first half with Glenorchy leading by 15 points at the half, before piling on four goals to two int the second half in a 12.9 (81) to 7.10 (52) victory. Callen Daly booted three goals, as Jaye Bowden (two) and Mitchell Rainbird (two) were both named among the best, as was Ryan Banks-Smith. For the Roos, Chris Nield and Sam Green both slotted a couple of majors, while playing coach Jeromey Webberley, Ethan Jackson and Oliver Davis (one goal) were named among the best.

Glenorchy:

#36 Callum Thompson

A quieter day from the talented teenager, but it did not stop him having an unforgettable goal in the second term, dribbling one home amongst traffic from the boundary line in the 24th minute. He had an earlier shot on goal from 40m out in eighth minute of the first term, but it drifted to the right. He finished with the nine touches and three inside 50, but crucially four one percenters.

Clarence:

#20 Oliver Davis

He has had more influential games, but Davis was still very impressive in Clarence’s loss. He played in his usual role onball and had the second most touches for his side with 19, but it was his tackling pressure that stood out. He put his body on the line and would win a couple of free kicks for being pushed in the back and then laying a tackle of his own. One of his free kicks received on the wing was helped with back-to-back 50s for ill-discipline from the opposition and he popped it home from the top of the goalsquare. Davis’ best strength as you can see week-in, week-out is his contested ball winning ability, but most of all within that facet, is his ability to get his hands free in a tackle. He has a neat short kick and works hard for his disposals, covering the ground well.

#23 Sam Banks

After a busy start, the bottom-aged Banks had a quieter outing. He showed good pressure in the opening five minutes in defence, laying a strong tackle and not giving away the free kick despite coming in at speed. He pushed back into defence to help out at times and after a quiet second term, won it early in the third with a long kick from half-back to half-forward and then used the ball well at half-back to go forward. His handball at half-back started a chain of possessions for the Roos that ended up in a goal to Nield up the other end. Loves to get involved in running plays, and whilst he still needs to iron out that consistency for four quarters, he catches the eye with his ball use and running ability.

#34 Noah Holmes

The bottom-age key forward looked like he was in for a big day with a great one-on-one contested mark in the goalsquare 12 and a half minutes into the match. He protected the ball drop, marked two metres out and kicked truly. He was worn like a glove by the opposition, and realistically should have had a second major nine minutes into the term. He won a free kick in front of goal, but Nield opted to take the advantage and kick his second instead. Holmes’ quick hands set up Keren Howlett for an important goal in the 12th minute of the second term, then had a chance for a major himself but his 40m set shot drifted for a behind. Holmes’ strong mark on the wing in the final term showed his work rate with a clean grab, but unfortunately missed his target in Davis and put it out on the full. His field kicking could definitely improve, but his work rate and contested marking – two from three of his marks were contested – were both highlights.

#46 Baker Smith

The bottom-ager probably played one of the best four-touch and three-mark games you will see. Standing at 192cm and 79kg in the pre-season, Smith is a touch under the key position height, but is strong enough in the air to match it with bigger opponents. In the match, those stats are not a typo, he had the four disposals and three marks, but two of those marks were contested, and he had five one percenters – the third most on the ground. The word synonymous with Smith is courage, and while he is not the most athletic player out there, he reads the play well and just plays his role defensively, coming across with a timely spoil in the final term to punch it out of bounds.

 

Lauderdale 12.10 (82) defeated North Hobart 4.5 (29)

Lauderdale conceded the first two goals of the game during its win over North Hobart, before piling on the next eight, and leading by 32 points at half-time. The Bombers kept the foot down after the main break, kicking four goals to one, to win 12.10 (82) to 4.5 (29). Luke Nelson (four goals) and Adrian Kalcovski (three) both showed their VFL experience in front of the big sticks for the home side, while Rhys Sutton and Nick Baker were named the winning side’s best. For North Hobart, Julian Dobosz slotted two majors, while Callum Kilpatrick and Baxter Norton kicked the other two goals. Patrick Walker, Norton and Michael Fisher were nominated as the Dees’ best in the loss.

Lauderdale:

#17 Nick Baker

In an important win, Baker was one of the Bombers best coming out of defence, juggling a nice balance of offensive and defensive traits. He has had much bigger games in terms of his own personal performance, but he did what he needed to do within the team game plan to have an impact. His disposals – 10 were down on his best efforts – but he had six one percenters, often pushing a higher line up the ground to be on the defensive side of the centre more so than in the back 50. This reflected in a number of both rebounds and inside 50s, working hard up and down the ground. Baker often looks for the handball receive and pump long with his raking long boot and an intercept in the last term led to a scoring opportunity which unfortunately became a behind rather than a major.

North Hobart:

#24 Sam Collins

Showing off a new number from his traditional #49, Collins was been well watched by the opposition forwards. He was held and won a free midway through the first term, and then judged his timing with his possession off half-back to hit Jye Menzie on a wing. He copped a knock close to quarter time but was fine to go, and took a strong contested mark early in the second term. Collins showed great courage throughout the match to put himself in front of a charging pack of players, then pushed forward from that moment to win it at half-forward, quickly pass it inside 50 but it was spoiled away. He does well in one-on-one situations and intercepting the play, and showed good run out of defence in the final term, pushing up to the win midway through the quarter to take a strong grab. He finished with the 14 disposals, five marks – two contested – five rebounds and two inside 50s, with just a little cleaner ball use the next improvement.

#46 Jye Menzie

Tried hard all day but could not have the same impact he has when North Hobart is attacking regularly and looking dangerous inside 50. The talented forward usually oozes X-factor, but was forced to go hunting for the ball up the ground, and while he still won plenty of it, did not have the same impact on the game as he normally would. He had a couple of “almost moments” such as midway through the final term paddling the ball in front of him, got tackled, got up, won it again and snapped from the boundary inside 50 but it unfortunately went out on the full. His low bullet pass inside 50 to Kilpatrick nine minutes into the second half was his most deadly touch.

#48 Patrick Walker

Of the top-age draft eligible players, Walker was certainly the best in this game, and played more of a four quarter effort than he has in past weeks. Most importantly, Walker’s biggest knock is his contested ball-winning ability, and he went a little way towards suggesting he is not completely outside when given the onball opportunity. Seeing him start at stoppages was great and he actually ran at 50 per cent contested from his 14 touches, and still managed 57 per cent efficiency. It might not have been his cleanest effort for what he is capable of with his ball use but he still had the greatest impact on the match for his side. He covered the ground well and as he showed in the second term, had a lovely lace out kick inside 50, then moments later took another good mark, spun around out of trouble to trick his opponent and hit up Dobosz leading out at him. To pick up four tackles and five inside 50s and even lay a couple of tackles was what really stood out, because while he turned the ball over on occasions, he tried to keep the ball moving and continuing to build his inside game is going to be the best way forward for his overall balance on the field. An impressive game.

 

Launceston 17.12 (114) defeated Tigers 2.6 (18)

After losing earlier in the round, Launceston showed no mercy against last placed Tigers, dominating with a 17.12 (114) to 2.6 (18) victory. They booted the only six goals of the first half to race to a 38-point lead by half-time, before Tigers finally kicked a major in the third term. By the end of that quarter though, the Blues had let loose and piled on another eight goals, then won the final term three goals to one during the 16-goal shellacking. Dylan Riley slotted eight goals in a mammoth effort up forward, while playing coach Mitch Thorp and Jay Blackberry booted three goals apiece, all outscoring the opposition by themselves. Tyler Carter was a lone hand up forward for Tigers, booting the two goals. Elijah Reardon and Ben Donnelly were nominated as the Tigers best in defeat, while Blackberry, Riley and Fletcher Seymour were impressive in the navy blue.

>> COMING TOMORROW: Jared Dakin Player Focus

TSL ROUND 8 RESULTS: 

Glenorchy 12.9 (81) defeated Clarence 7.10 (52)
Lauderdale 12.10 (82) defeated North Hobart 4.5 (29)
Launceston 17.12 (114) defeated Tigers 2.6 (18)

Picture: Solstice Digital & Photography