Tag: queensland

AFL Draft Watch: Alex Davies (Gold Coast SUNS Academy/Allies)

IN the build up to football eventually returning, Draft Central takes a look at some of this year’s brightest names who have already represented their state at Under 17 or Under 18s level in 2019. While plenty can change between now and then, we will provide a bit of an insight into players, how they performed at pre-season testing, and some of our scouting notes on them from last year.

Next under the microscope in our AFL Draft watch is Gold Coast SUNS Academy product Alex Davies, a big-bodied inside midfielder who looms as Queensland’s most promising 2020 prospect. Solidly built at 191cm and 85kg, Davies is a terrific extractor at the stoppages and finds the ball at will, setting the tone from midfield. He represented the Maroons at Under 16 and 17 level, but will now be looking to become the centrepiece of the Allies’ engine room as a top-ager. His four NAB League outings as a bottom-ager also put him in good stead, and he could cost the SUNS first round points value come draft time.

PLAYER PAGE:

Alex Davies
Gold Coast SUNS Academy/Allies

DOB: March 18, 2002

Height: 191cm
Weight: 85kg

Position: Inside Midfielder

Strengths: Contested ball, clean hands, distribution, poise
Improvements: Outside impact

2019 NAB League stats: 4 games, 18 disposals (49.3% contested possessions), 2.8 marks, 3.5 tackles, 3.8 clearances, 2.8 inside 50s, 1.3 rebound 50s, 0.3 goals (1)

>> Q&A: Alex Davies
>> Marquee Matchup: Davies vs. McInnes

PRESEASON TESTING RESULTS:

Did not test.

>> Full Testing Results:
Jumps
20m Sprint
Agility
Yo-yo

2019 SCOUTING NOTES:

Under 17 Futures All Stars

By: Ed Pascoe

The Gold Coast academy prospect was one of Team Dal Santo’s better performers going through the midfield and winning plenty of the ball especially early. He is a nice size as a modern day tall midfielder and he had no trouble winning first possession and dishing it out to his runners. He kicked a lovely goal in the last quarter under pressure he was able to cleanly pickup and quickly kick a nice running goal.

Under 17 Futures vs. Vic Metro

By: Ed Pascoe

The tallest of Queensland’s big midfielders standing at 190cm, he was a strong player around stoppages going in hard to win clearances but also working hard around the ground to be an option. Davies showed good attack on the ball but he also showed his ability to pressure and give multiple efforts through the midfield, and had a good bit of play in the first quarter with a great second effort smother. Davies finished the game with 15 disposals and was his team’s leading clearance player with five.

Under 17 Futures vs. NSW/ACT

By: Michael Alvaro

Davies’ game suited the conditions, with the big-bodied midfielder bustling around packs and forcing his way through at stoppages. His approach was pretty simple, slamming the ball on the boot in traffic and gaining territory for his team – often kicking off one or two steps. He did the hard stuff as well with six tackles and a spoil to kill the ball from a front-half kick-in.

NAB League Round 6 vs. GWV

By: Sophie Taylor

Davies used his height to his advantage, providing a solid option in pack scenarios while showing some good movement in space and shepherds around stoppages. He put pressure on ground ball and crumbers, credit to his clever use of space and ability to barrel through a pack. Had only the 12 touches, three marks and two tackles, but his bodywork around the ball was solid.

>> MORE SUNS ACADEMY CONTENT

>> 2020 Allies U18s Squad Prediction
>> Positional Analysis: Inside Mids
>> July 2020 Power Rankings

>> CATCH UP ON OUR DRAFT WATCH SERIES

Allies:
Tahj Abberley
Jackson Callow
Braeden Campbell
Oliver Davis
Errol Gulden

South Australia:
Kaine Baldwin
Bailey Chamberlain
Corey Durdin
Luke Edwards
Taj Schofield
Riley Thilthorpe

Vic Country:
Sam Berry
Tanner Bruhn
Jack Ginnivan
Elijah Hollands
Zach Reid
Nick Stevens
Jamarra Ugle-Hagan

Vic Metro:
Jackson Cardillo
Nikolas Cox
Connor Downie
Finlay Macrae
Reef McInnes
Archie Perkins
Will Phillips

Western Australia:
Denver Grainger-Barras
Logan McDonald
Nathan O’Driscoll
Brandon Walker
Joel Western

2020 QAFL season preview: Three months later, the QAFL returns

AFTER an extended break, the 10 Queensland Australian Football League (QAFL) teams are preparing to run out for the first time in 2020 this weekend. The nine teams are comprised of four Brisbane sides, four Gold Coast teams and one Sunshine Coast side. Sandhurst Hawks competed in 2019, but withdrew from the competition for 2020 late last year.

Last year, Surfers Paradise Demons triumphed in the grand final over Palm Beach Currumbin. The Demons stopped their opponents from winning a three-peat after successfully claiming the 2017-18 flags. It was the fourth consecutive grand final for the Lions who went 2-2 from the reign at the top, while for the Demons, it was a historic moment to take out their first ever flag since competing in the previous Gold Coast AFL competition. Palm Beach Currumbin’s back-to-back titles are the only two on record for the Lions as well, showing a shift in the success for teams of late.

Overall of the current teams in the top grade, Southport leads the way with 13 premierships, only two behind Mayne, a side that won its last in 1982 and currently plays in the Queensland Football Association (QFA) North. Next up is Morningside with nine flags and Coorparoo with six, whilst Broadbeach and Maroochydore remain the only two sides yet to taste premiership glory in the top grade. Wilston Grange has the longest premiership drought of the lot, with Gorillas fans having to go back to 1972 for their last flag.

Throwback to last year and the eventual premiers, Surfers Paradise finished second on the table behind their grand finalists, Palm Beach Currumbin. Morningside was behind the Demons on percentage still notching up 12 wins, while Broadbeach sat fourth two wins behind third, but with a higher percentage. Mt Gravatt was in fifth, but 12 points behind in the standings.

Round 1 takes place this Saturday with Broadbeach having the first bye of the new nine-round season where each team plays every other team once. The top six make the finals, with the top two given the first week of finals off, to play the winners of the elimination semi-finals of third to sixth placings. The QAFL Grand Final will take place on Saturday, September 26.

Reigning champion Surfers Paradise opens its account against Palm Beach Currumbin in a massive grand final rematch at Sir Bruce Small Park. It leads a host of big games, including Sherwood up against Mt Gravatt, Morningside taking on Labrador and Maroochydore facing off against Wilston Grange.

In terms of the young guns coming through the AFL Academy Allies’ hub, potential first round pick, Alex Davies is aligned to Broadbeach, along with Aidan Fyfe, while Morningside had a talented duo in Blake Coleman and Saxon Crozier. Jack Johnston is a Palm Beach Currumbin player, whilst Carter Michael represents Maroochydore. Noah McFadyen (Wilston Grange), Rhys Nicholls (Labrador) and Jack Briskey (Western Magpies) are all aligned to clubs there, whilst Tahj Abberley won a Rising Star nomination for Sandgate but of course the Hawks will no longer be competing in the top tier this season.

Q&A: Jye Lockett (GWV Rebels/Queensland)

AS the postponement of all seasons commenced over the last few weeks, we head back to the pre-season where we sat down with a number of athletes across the country. In a special Question and Answer (Q&A) feature, Draft Central‘s Michael Alvaro chatted with Greater Western Victoria (GWV) Rebels’ Jye Lockett at the NAB League Fitness Testing Day hosted by Rookie Me.

It would only seem fitting that the nephew of Tony Lockett would ply his trade as a budding centre half-forward, and furthermore make the move down to Ballarat as he looks pursue footballing and schooling opportunities. The Queenslander is also part of the Gold Coast SUNS Academy and represented Queensland at last year’s Under 16 National Championships, booting multiple goals in two of the three games.

>> CATCH UP ON OUR FEATURES

Q&A:

MA: Jye, how’s the day been so far?

JL: “It’s been good to see all the other teams here. Everyone goes out there and competes hard and I guess it gives a good indication of your athletic ability.”

 

Which of the tests are you excelling in or looking to improve on at the moment?

“I didn’t do too bad at the agility (test) but I’d probably like to work on my 20-metre sprint.”

 

How has the transition been coming from Queensland?

“It was good, I moved down just before last year and was in the Under 16s Rebels program. I moved into the 18s this year and it’s going really well.”

 

You enjoyed a pretty successful Under 16 carnival as well playing forward alongside Noah McFadyen, how was that?

“Yes, I love playing with ‘Nug’. He’s a great bloke and I think we work really well together, so that 16s Queensland side was real fun.”

 

Will you continue to represent Queensland and the Allies or transition to Vic Country?

“The plan was this year to play with the Queensland Futures 17s and go through the Allies program in my 18th year, but I’m not too sure about that just yet. I’m focused on this year.”

 

And you’ve come down for school as well?

“Yes, I got a scholarship at St Patrick’s College in Ballarat and have done Year 11 and 12 there.”

 

Who are some of the boys from there and the Rebels you’re looking forward to playing alongside?

Ben Hobbs and Charlie Molan, Josh Rentsch – a few of the Academy boys. It’ll be good to play alongside them and learn off all their different skills.”

 

In terms of position, are you looking to move further afield in future?

“Yes. Centre half-forward is obviously the main position but anywhere from half-forward or deep forward, even pushing up the ground into the midfield or up on the wing is probably the next goal.”

 

Do you have any other goals for the year?

“Obviously if I can play really well in those Queensland Under 17 games then get into the Under 18 Academy and Allies (squad) and set myself up really well.”

AFLW U18s Ones to Watch: Daisy D’Arcy (Gold Coast Suns Academy/Queensland)

IN a new series focusing on the up and coming AFL Women’s Draft hopefuls, we take a look at some names who would be among their respective states’ top draft prospects for the 2020 AFL Women’s Draft.

Next under the microscope is Gold Coast Suns Academy talent, Daisy D’Arcy who showed some really promising signs in her middle-age year last year for Queensland at the AFL Women’s Under-18 Championships, then lit up the track at the state pre-season testing event. However she has a massive decision to make with FOUR – not a typo – sports she has reached state level within a pathway system.

Daisy D’Arcy (Gold Coast Suns Academy/Queensland)

Height: 163cm
Position: Utility
Strengths: Footy smarts, skills, decision making, versatility, consistency

2019 Under 18 National Championships stats: 3 games | 9.3 disposals | 0.7 marks | 2.0 tackles | 1.0 rebounds | 1 goal

So much is spoken about players who have a decision to make as a dual sport athlete at an elite level. Many players come through playing a couple of sports and really dominating and then are forced to give it up. Not many come through and seem to be among the best in their state at three sports let alone four. That is exactly the case with Gold Coast Suns Academy member and Queensland talent, Daisy D’Arcy. The 163cm player has reached state level in not only Australian rules football, but rugby, soccer and cricket as well. From all reports up in Townsville where she resides, D’Arcy has a smorgasbord of options when it comes to what she is capable of following in the future.

Speaking strictly about her footballing ability, D’Arcy is a clever small who can play just about anywhere on the ground. She averaged nine touches, a couple of tackles and a rebound at last year’s AFL Women’s Under-18 Championships, while booting a goal after outsmarting her opponent. Queensland might not have had the most successful carnival last year – especially compared to the huge one 12 months prior – but D’Arcy was among a heap of young talent coming through. Assuming the 2020 addition gets up, one would expect the talented teenager to have more a role through the midfield after spending time at either end in 2019 given the strength of the Sunshine State’s onball brigade, such as future AFL Women’s players Ellie Hampson and Lily Postlethwaite among others.

When speaking to Draft Central at last year’s championships, the middle-ager spoke of her love for both Australian rules and rugby as her two main sports, though it is clear her entry into the Queensland Academy of Sport for her soccer, and her ability to play in the Townsville Super Sixes competition earlier this year show that she is capable of anything. What she chooses will be interesting, but it is no surprise that her footy smarts, decision making and skills were among some her top traits at last year’s carnival. By her own admission, her greatest strength is reliability, happy to play the team game and play a role. What role that will be, in what code is yet to be seen, but when it comes to sporting talent, D’Arcy is up there with the most versatile at the elite junior level.

Squad predictions: 2020 Allies Under 18s

THE annual Under 18 National Championships may be the only chance we get to catch a glimpse of the class of 2020 before draft day, with carnival likely to take place in October. In the meantime, Draft Central takes a look at how each regional squad may line up should the championships come around, but with a few stipulations in place. We began with our Vic Metro, Vic Country, South Australian, and West Australian squad predictions, and today we take a look at the potential Allies line-up.

GUIDELINES:

  • Top-agers (2002-born) have been prioritised due to the limited season and exposure
  • Of those, AFL Academy Hub members also gain priority for the starting squad
  • The inclusion of bottom-agers (2003-born) in the hub, and top-agers outside it is limited
  • 19-year-old inclusions are also limited, having already staked their claims in previous years

A lot may change between now and when the squad will be announced, and it should be noted that players with known long-term injuries will not be picked here. Of course, the sides may vary greatly as players look to shift and develop in different positions, but each member has been selected based on the roles they have previously played. Given only previous form, preseason testing and scratch matches are what we have to go off, bolters are also difficult to gauge at this point.

Players named as depth outside of the initial squad below are inevitably options who will rotate through the side, and it is impossible to fit all the options within a list of 22. But without further ado, let’s get stuck into the fifth and final squad prediction, with the Allies’ talent broken down line-by-line. The Allies squad is made up of talent from NSW/ACT, Queensland, Tasmania, and the Northern Territory.

DEFENCE

FB – Brodie Lake (NT Thunder/Peel), Jack Johnston (Gold Coast), Patrick Walker (Tasmania)
HB – Charlie Byrne (Murray), Ryan Pickering (Gold Coast), Sam Collins (Tasmania)

Two Gold Coast Suns Academy members make up the heart of our proposed Allies defence, with genuine talls Jack Johnston (195cm) and Ryan Pickering (199cm) slotting into key position posts. The additions of Brodie Lake and Sam Collins contribute even further to the height and marking power of the defence, with Collins’ intercept and rebound qualities also valuable assets.

Collins’ fellow Tasmanian Patrick Walker should provide similarly astute ball use from defence at a shorter range, while Murray product Charlie Byrne also likes to push further afield and deal damage by foot. The back six should have no trouble competing aerially on the defensive side, while being able to yield an attacking threat on the turnover.


MIDFIELD

C – Saxon Crozier (Brisbane), Oliver Davis (Tasmania), Carter Michael (Brisbane)
FOL – Thomas Hofert (Gold Coast), Alex Davies (Gold Coast), Braeden Campbell (Sydney)

Queenslanders take up four of the six midfield spots in our Allies side, with Brisbane Lions Academy members Saxon Crozier and Carter Michael starting on either wing, while 201cm ruck Thomas Hofert has been tasked with tapping down to Gold Coast Academy teammate Alex Davies at the centre bounces.

There is plenty of grunt in the engine room trio of Davies, Braeden Campbell, and Oliver Davis; with Davies the tallest of the lot (191cm) as that pure big-bodied type, while Davis (182cm) is another extractor who comes in at a similar build to the speedy and versatile Campbell (180cm).

The likes of Crozier and Michael may fancy a run through the middle but seem well suited to the outside, with a number of flankers and depth options in our squad also able to pitch in. Still, we feel this is the best mix, and one which gives the Allies a great chance to compete strongly in the area in which each contest begins.


FORWARD

HF – Errol Gulden (Sydney), Josh Green (GWS), Joel Jeffrey (NT Thunder)
FF – Marco Rossmann (Sydney), Jackson Callow (Tasmania), Blake Coleman (Brisbane)

In a similar vein to the defensive mix, this forward six provides good versatility and some great marking power. Jackson Callow is the centrepiece at full forward, a physical key position type who is near-unstoppable with his contested marking, and may well take on ruck duties inside forward 50. Josh Green, brother of GWS draftee Tom, is a 192cm utility who can play up either end. He slots in at centre half-forward for now on account of his aerial ability.

The diminutive but brilliant Errol Gulden comes in on a forward flank but will have eyes on moving up to a wing, with fellow Swans Academy product Marco Rossmann a solid medium type who may also run through the midfield. In the opposite flank to Rossmann is exciting forward Blake Coleman, who along with Northern Territory prospect Joel Jeffrey, provides clean hands and a terrific goal sense. With silver service likely to come from a strong midfield core, this forward mix could do some damage at the national carnival when on song.


INTERCHANGE

INT – Marc Sheather (Sydney), Jared Dakin (Tasmania), Tahj Abberley (Brisbane), Maurice Rioli Jnr (NT Thunder/Oakleigh)

This interchange group is, well, incredibly interchangeable with the group of depth players listed below, but all bring something different to the side. Jared Dakin makes the cut as the only over-ager in the squad given he garnered interest at last year’s draft, and he’ll provide a good ball winning boost.

Tahj Abberley and Maurice Rioli Jnr add some x-factor and smarts at ground level as part of the rotational group. Abberley is likely to play as a small defender but is just as capable up forward or through midfield, while Rioli could well be the genuine small forward that the side is missing. Rounding out the chosen 22 is Marc Sheather, another versatile medium type who can play well above his size at either end given his athleticism.


SQUAD DEPTH

There remains a decent crop of top-agers who narrowly missed the cut, and some bottom-aged talent which will inevitably squeeze into the team minus any stipulations. Among the most unlucky to miss were AFL Academy hub members Rhys Nicholls and Aidan Fyfe, who could both slot in as half-backs or outside types. Kye Pfrengle is another defensive option who will get a look-in, while Jack Briskey and Jack Driscoll are taller types who should also rotate through the same line. Meanwhile, Tyrrell Lui and Ryan Eyers are prospects who may also be thereabouts.

In terms of top-agers outside of the AFL Academy intake, Tasmania’s Isaac Chugg is a terrific athlete, while Devils teammates Will Harper and Jye Menzie are well known to selectors. Sydney’s Pierce Roseby is a tough small who thrived in NSW/ACT colours, as did Max Pescud in the Maroon of Queensland.

Moving on to over-agers, and Tasmanian over-ager Hamish Allan would help the ruck stocks at 206cm, with GIANT-turned-Knight Liam Delahunty another tall who remains among the Under 18 ranks. In terms of Queensland-based 19-year-olds, the likes of forward movers Bruce Reville, Josh Gore, and Hewago Paul Oea have already shown plenty of promise.

Finally, an exciting group of bottom-aged talent is set to cause some selection headaches, lead by Tasmanian gun Sam Banks. He, and Tasmanian teammate Baynen Lowe impressed at Under 16 level enough to warrant NAB League selection in 2019. Queensland Under 16 MVP Austin Harris will also push his case as a small defender, while GIANTS Academy members Sam Stening and Josh Fahey are hard to deny, as is big Queensland forward Noah McFadyen.

>> READ UP ON THE 2020 ALLIES U18s:

Brisbane Lions Academy
Gold Coast SUNS Academy
GWS GIANTS Academy
Sydney Swans Academy
Tasmania Devils

AFL Draft Watch:

Tahj Abberley
Jackson Callow
Braeden Campbell
Oliver Davis
Errol Gulden

Marquee Matchups:

Jackson Callow vs. Cam Fleeton
Braeden Campbell vs. Corey Durdin
Alex Davies vs. Reef McInnes
Errol Gulden vs. Jake Bowey

Positional Analysis:

Key Forwards

>> 2020 UNDER 18 SQUAD PREDICTIONS:

South Australia
Vic Country
Vic Metro
Western Australia

AFL Draft Watch: Tahj Abberley (Brisbane Lions Academy/Allies)

IN the build up to football eventually returning, Draft Central takes a look at some of this year’s brightest names who have already represented their state at Under 17 or Under 18s level in 2019. While plenty can change between now and then, we will provide a bit of an insight into players, how they performed at the NAB League Preseason Testing Day hosted by Rookie Me, and some of our scouting notes on them from last year.

Next under the microscope in our AFL Draft Watch is Brisbane Lions Academy member Tahj Abberley, a nippy small utility who was an outstanding preseason testing performer. The 179cm prospect ranked among Queensland’s top 10 in all four testing areas, utilising the speed, agility, and endurance he showcased on-field throughout his junior career. Abberley featured in all five of Brisbane’s NAB League outings and represented Queensland at the Under 16 and 17 levels and in 2020, he will be looking to crack into the Allies side while mixing up his usual midfield/forward role to feature off half-back.

PLAYER PAGE:

Tahj Abberley
Brisbane Lions Academy/Allies

DOB: April 23, 2002

Height: 179cm
Weight: 70kg

Position: Small utility

2019 NAB LEAGUE STATS: 5 games | 14.4 disposals | 4.0 marks | 2.8 tackles | 1.6 clearances | 1.8 inside 50s | 1.8 rebound 50s | 0.4 goals (2)

Strengths: Speed, agility, smarts, decision making
Improvements: Contested ball

>> GET TO KNOW Tahj Abberley

PRESEASON TESTING HIGHLIGHTS:

Standing Vertical Jump – 65cm
Running Vertical Jump (R/L) – 77cm/82cm
Speed (20m) – 3.02 seconds
Agility – 7.84 seconds
Endurance – 21.1

>> FULL RESULTS:
Jumps
Speed
Agility
Endurance

SCOUTING NOTES:

2019 Under 17 Futures vs. NSW/ACT

There’s not much of Abberley, but the Lions Academy product looked unfazed by having to get stuck in. Playing through the midfield and off half-back, Abberley was clean at ground level and smart with his hands out of congestion. His four clearances bode well for more midfield minutes, but Abberley also worked well around the ground to penetrate both arcs

2019 NAB League Round 5 vs. Sandringham

The bottom-ager looked most lively inside 50 during the second half, and was instrumental in Brisbane’s best few minutes of the game. He started up the field on a wing and took a nice overhead mark in the second quarter, backing it up with a courageous effort after half time. Abberley laid a fantastic tackle on the much bigger Corey Watts which went unrewarded, but he managed to snare a goal with a calm dribbled finish out the back.

2018 Under 16 National Championships vs. NSW/ACT

Abberley was a clever user throughout the game, nipping around with good pace and agility from the midfield, forward. He started well with a goal from a free kick after sharking the ball cleanly but being taken high. His left foot was damaging too with some handy forward 50 entries helping the Maroons to push the pace.

>> MORE BRISBANE LIONS U18s CONTENT

Q&As:

Blake Coleman
Saxon Crozier
Carter Michael

>> CATCH UP ON OUR DRAFT WATCH SERIES

Allies:
Jackson Callow
Braeden Campbell
Oliver Davis

South Australia:
Kaine Baldwin
Luke Edwards
Taj Schofield
Riley Thilthorpe

Vic Country:
Sam Berry
Jack Ginnivan
Nick Stevens
Jamarra Ugle-Hagan

Vic Metro:
Jackson Cardillo
Nikolas Cox
Connor Downie
Reef McInnes
Archie Perkins

Western Australia:
Denver Grainger-Barras
Logan McDonald
Nathan O’Driscoll

Q&A: Isabella Kotatis (Brisbane Lions Academy/Queensland)

AS the postponement of all seasons commenced over the last week, we head back to the pre-season where we chatted to a number of athletes across the country. In a special Question and Answer (Q&A) feature, Draft Central‘s Taylah Melki chatted with Queensland’s Isabella Kotatis at the state testing day hosted by Rookie Me.

Q&A:

 

TM: How did you get into footy, Izzy?

IK: “I’ve been playing it since Auskick, when I was younger back in Adelaide. Then we made the change over to Queensland and I’ve been playing ever since.”

 

What is it that you love about football to have kept you in it for so long?

“The interaction with everyone, you make a lot of new friends through it. Just the friendship groups I guess.”

 

What made you start Auskick, have you just always been interested in footy?

“My little brother played it. Me, my sister and my brother all used to do sports together so we all decided to do it.”

 

Has it always been only football for you?

“I’m playing Rugby 7s for school, a bit of touch, and a bit of netball. But mainly just rugby and (football).

 

How do you balance the two?

“It’s a lot busier now since I’ve been part of the academy. There’s barely any time to play rugby for school so I’ve got to try and make days as it’s the same days as the academy training.”

 

And how are you finding being part of the academy?

“Really good. I’m learning more new things than I would if I wasn’t in the academy. With club it’s a lot different compare to the academy, it’s more of a high level.”

 

Do you enjoy that higher level and intensity?

“Yes, I enjoy it a lot.”

 

What would you say are some of your strengths on-field?

“I would say my speed and hunger to get the ball.”

 

On the other side of that, what are you looking to improve on?

“My weaknesses would probably be my defensive area, as I’ve been playing a lot more in the half-back role. Hopefully just improving that to be the best I can be in that area.”

 

How are you finding playing that position?

“Really good, I’ve only just started playing it recently. There’s a lot more things that I could improve on but I’m enjoying it a lot.”

 

What are you hoping to get out of this season?

“Hopefully to be drafted at the end of the year. That’s my goal, but also just to improve my footy a lot.”

 

Has there been a lot of travel for you over the journey?

“Yes. As I said with rugby, football is my number one priority so I’m just trying to balance it out with school and trainings.”

 

How do you manage all the commitments, especially with school?

“I’m in Year 12 this year so it’s a lot harder with everything but somehow I’m managing to do it all.”

 

Do you have any sports stars or idols you’ve looked up to over the years?

“I looked up to (Lance) Buddy Franklin from Hawthorn, but now to the Sydney Swans, because he was my brother’s favourite. If it was to be with the AFLW, I’d probably say Monique Conti.”

 

Why Monique?

“Just her ability to chase the ball and how her speed is really good, with good pressure.”

 

And how has the preseason been for you overall?

“Really good. It’s been a lot harder trying to get fitter throughout the whole season but it’s been good.”

Get to know: Blake Coleman (Brisbane Lions Academy/Allies)

AS the postponement of all seasons commenced over the last few weeks, we are taking a look at some of the up-and-coming draft prospects for the 2020 draft. In a special Question and Answer (Q&A) feature, Draft Central‘s Peter Williams chatted with Brisbane Lions Academy prospect Blake Coleman. As we delve into the Queensland-based talent, you’ll get to know everything you need to know about the brightest academy talents.

The eye-catching forward is near-unbeatable inside forward 50 at full flight, with his clean hands and goal sense setting him apart. While the 180cm prospect is working on his endurance, his speed and power over the short term have put him in good stead. Having represented Queensland at Under 16 and 17 level, and running out for Brisbane during the Academy Series, Coleman is looking to break into the Allies side and follow in the footsteps of brother, Keidean in reaching the elite level.

>> CATCH UP ON ALL OUR FEATURES

Q&A:


PW: How have you found testing today?

BC: “It’s been good. It’s been a long day but it’s good to come out and do it, see all the teams come out and the boys supporting each other through it. It’s always tough, especially with the yo-yo at the end but the boys’ support is good. It helps you get through it.”

 

You mentioned the yo-yo, is that one of the areas you’re looking to improve on?

“I’m definitely looking to improve on my fitness throughout my journey as I get better. I know I haven’t been the best but I’m just looking forward to improving which is always exciting.”

 

How’d you find the other tests?

“I found them pretty fun actually with the agility and 20-metre sprint. It’s good to test yourself and try to beat your previous records.”

 

Do you see those areas as your strengths, testing-wise?

“Yes, I think speed is something I love to use during games, which I find as a strength.”

 

How’s the preseason been overall so far?

“Preseason is always tough physically and mentally but it’s good. It’s always a challenge but it’s stuff you’ve got to do to improve as a player.”

 

You had some time to train with the senior Brisbane Lions boys as well?

“Yes, we got two weeks with Brisbane throughout the preseason which was a good experience for some of the boys in the squad. You can definitely see how fast it is and just the skills are very good. We definitely got a lot out of it.”

 

What’s it been like for you watching your brother getting a chance in the AFL as a 19-year-old?

“Watching him was good. I’m very proud of him because he obviously didn’t get selected in his (top-age) year but didn’t give up which our family is very proud of him (for). He kept going and he achieved in the end which was good.

“Getting to train with him throughout those weeks, he definitely made it much better because I’ve been around him obviously my whole life, it was good.”

 

Does that give you confidence as well, knowing that if you don’t get drafted at the first chance, you’ve got another year to prove yourself?

“Definitely. Knowing that if he could do it, I can as well. It’s something I can be confident with, I’ve just got to keep going and I know I can do it if I just stay strong and believe in myself.”

 

On-field, what do you see as your strengths?

“Maybe my marking. I love jumping and contesting for the ball, I love to tackle and put pressure on. There’s strengths there but there’s obviously room to improve as well.”

 

Do you have a preferred position?

“I play forward which I much prefer, but I do like going through the midfield as well which is a good experience.”

 

What goals are you hoping to tick off this year?

“My goals this year are to hopefully play all the Academy Series games, which would be nice to get through those. Then obviously the Allies squad which I’d love to play in, all games later in the year.

“Obviously at the end of the year to try and get drafted which would be something I’m very proud of – not only for me, but to make my family proud. Moving here with my brother was a tough decision but it was good, so the family back home would be very proud.”

Preseason testing results: Which State has the best hops?

THE current sporting hiatus serves as somewhat of an extended preseason for the nation’s brightest AFL Draft prospects, who will be itching to get back on the field. Aside from a few scratch matches on the eve of Round 1, much of the 2020 class has had little in the way of competition thus far.

But preseason testing always serves to get the competitive juices flowing, with players from each region and academy coming together to test where they rate athletically. Rookie Me hosted the preseason testing in Victoria, South Australia, Queensland and Tasmania, while the AFL completed testing in Western Australia and NSW/ACT.

In our next analysis of the results from those days around the country, we take a look at the standing and running vertical jump scores and try to answer the question of ‘Which State has the best hops?’. We have compiled the top 10 scores from each State, an overall top 10, and averages from around the nation to help answer the question.

>> SCROLL DOWN FOR THE OVERALL TOP 10’s

>> CATCH UP ON PREVIOUS RESULTS:

20m Sprint
Agility Test
Yo-yo test

STATE TOP 10’s

NEW SOUTH WALES

Standing Vertical Jump:

1. Lachlan Squire (GWS GIANTS Academy) – 80cm
=2. Gaige Saunders (GWS GIANTS Academy) – 76cm
=2. Lenny Robin (Sydney Swans Academy) – 76cm
4. Jordan Endemann (Sydney Swans Academy) – 69cm
=5. Macauley Smith (GWS GIANTS Academy) – 68cm
=5. Hamish Gilmore (GWS GIANTS Academy) – 68cm
=7. Jack Driscoll (GWS GIANTS Academy) – 67cm
=7. Alexander Kourakis (Sydney Swans Academy) – 67cm
=7. Marco Rossmann (Sydney Swans Academy) – 67cm
10. Noah Clarke (GWS GIANTS Academy) – 66cm

Top 10 Average: 70.4cm
State Average:
59.8cm

Running Vertical Jump (R):

1. Fraser Kelly (GWS GIANTS Academy) – 83cm
2. Lachlan Squire (GWS GIANTS Academy) – 80cm
=3. Austin Ball (Sydney Swans Academy) – 79cm
=3. Jacob Bauer (Sydney Swans Academy) – 79cm
=5. Macauley Smith (GWS GIANTS Academy) – 78cm
=5. Jordan Endemann (Sydney Swans Academy) – 78cm
7. Isaiah Olsen (Sydney Swans Academy) – 77cm
=8. Maximus Monaghan (GWS GIANTS Academy) – 75cm
=8. Kye Pfrengle (Sydney Swans Academy) – 75cm
=8. Thomas Longmire (Sydney Swans Academy) – 75cm

Top 10 Average: 77.9cm
State Average: 
66.2cm

Running Vertical Jump (L):

1. Eddie Marning (Sydney Swans Academy) – 89cm
2. Kye Pfrengle (Sydney Swans Academy) – 86cm
=3. Lachlan Squire (GWS GIANTS Academy) – 85cm
=3. Matthew McKenzie (Sydney Swans Academy) – 85cm
=5. Coopa Steele (GWS GIANTS Academy) – 83cm
=5. Hamish Gilmore (GWS GIANTS Academy) – 83cm
=7. Scott Brown (GWS GIANTS Academy) – 82cm
=7. Lenny Robin (GWS GIANTS Academy) – 82cm
9. Fraser Kelly (GWS GIANTS Academy) – 81cm
=10. 80cm x3

Top 10 Average: 83.6cm
State Average: 
71.5cm

QUEENSLAND

Standing Vertical Jump:

1. Jack Briskey (Brisbane Lions Academy) – 77cm
2. Ethan Kerr (Brisbane Lions Academy) – 73cm
3. Riley Buckland (Gold Coast SUNS Academy) – 72cm
4. Jayren Willie (Gold Coast SUNS Academy) – 71cm
=5. Damon Eastwell (Brisbane Lions Academy) – 69cm
=5. Caleb Hammond (Brisbane Lions Academy) – 69cm
=7. Jack Willis (Gold Coast SUNS Academy) – 68cm
=7. Nathan Davis (Brisbane Lions Academy) – 68cm
=9. Reed Maskell-Dobbin (Brisbane Lions Academy) – 67cm
=10. 66cm x2

Top 10 Average: 70cm
State Average:
60.1cm

Running Vertical Jump (R):

1. Riley Buckland (Gold Coast SUNS Academy) – 85cm
=2. Shaye Walsh (Gold Coast SUNS Academy) – 83cm
=2. Jed Foggo (Gold Coast SUNS Academy) – 83cm
=4. Finn Brown (Gold Coast SUNS Academy) – 82cm
=4. Jack Willis (Gold Coast SUNS Academy) – 82cm
6. James Packer (Brisbane Lions Academy) – 80cm
7. Damon Eastwell (Brisbane Lions Academy) – 79cm
8. Tahj Abberley (Brisbane Lions Academy) – 77cm
9. Charlie Bowes (Brisbane Lions Academy) – 76cm
10. Jayren Willie (Gold Coast SUNS Academy) – 75cm

Top 10 Average: 80.2cm
State Average: 68.4cm

Running Vertical Jump (L):

1. Riley Buckland (Gold Coast SUNS Academy) – 93cm
2. Jack Briskey (Brisbane Lions Academy) – 90cm
3. Damon Eastwell (Brisbane Lions Academy) – 87cm
4. Lochlan Harrop (Brisbane Lions Academy) – 86cm
5. Kuot Thok (Brisbane Lions Academy) – 85cm
=6. Reed Maskell-Dobbin (Brisbane Lions Academy) – 82cm
=6. Tahj Abberley (Brisbane Lions Academy) – 82cm
8. Jack Willis (Gold Coast SUNS Academy) – 81cm
=9. Bodhi Uwland (Gold Coast SUNS Academy) – 80cm
=9. Nathan Davis (Brisbane Lions Academy) – 80cm

Top 10 Average: 84.6cm
State Average: 71.6cm

SOUTH AUSTRALIA

Standing Vertical Jump:

1. Harvey Bock (West Adelaide) – 75cm
=2. Jordan Kasianowicz (WWT) – 73cm
=2. Nick Tape (South Adelaide) – 73cm
=2. Henry Read (Sturt) – 73cm
=5. Liam Ueding (WWT) – 71cm
=5. Bailey Griffiths (West Adelaide) – 71cm
=5. Logan Mulady (North Adelaide) – 71cm
=5. Samuel Duke (Norwood) – 71cm
=5. Tom Powell (Sturt) – 71cm
=10. 70cm x3

Top 10 Average: 71.9cm
State Average:
58.5cm

Running Vertical Jump (R):

1. Matthew Borlace (Central District) – 92cm
=2. Jordan Kasianowicz (WWT) – 89cm
=2. Lachlan Jones (WWT) – 89cm
4. Tom Powell (Sturt) – 88cm
=5. Zabien Parker-Boers (Sturt) – 87cm
=5. Declan Hortle (Sturt) – 87cm
=7. Aston Woods (West Adelaide) – 86cm
=7. Lachlan Grubb (Central District) – 86cm
9. Henry Read (Sturt) – 84cm
=10. 81cm x2

Top 10 Average: 86.9cm
State Average:
66.1cm

Running Vertical Jump (L):

1. Henry Read (Sturt) – 91cm
=2. Kane Viska (Glenelg) – 90cm
=2. Lachlan Grubb (Central District) – 90cm
=4. Ned Walter (Sturt) – 89cm
=4. Tom Powell (Sturt) – 89cm
6. Elliott McNamara (North Adelaide) – 88cm
7. Zabien Parker-Boers (Sturt) – 87cm
=8. Jase Burgoyne (WWT) – 86cm
=8. Lachlan Jones (WWT) – 86cm
=8. Lewis Cowham (Central District) – 86cm

Top 10 Average: 88.2cm
State Average:
70.1cm

TASMANIA

Standing Vertical Jump:

=1. Sam Collins (North Hobart) – 68cm
=1. Darcy Gardner (Clarence) – 68cm
3. Isaac Chugg (Lauceston) – 67cm
=4. Will Peppin (North Hobart) – 63cm
=4. George McLeod (North Hobart) – 63cm
=4. Lachlan Blakemore (Penguin) – 63cm
7. Harry Ireland (North Hobart) – 62cm
=8. Jackson Callow (North Launceston) – 61cm
=8. Jared Dakin (Launceston) – 61cm
=10. 60cm x3

Top 10 Average: 63.6cm
State Average:
56.4cm

Running Vertical Jump (R):

1. Isaac Chugg (Launceston) – 82cm
2. Dominic White (North Hobart) – 80cm
3. Harry Ireland (North Hobart) – 79cm
=4. Will Peppin (North Hobart) – 75cm
=4. Patrick Walker (North Hobart) – 75cm
6. Sam Collins (North Hobart) – 74cm
7. Blade Sulzberger (Prospect) – 73cm
=8. Jared Dakin (Launceston) – 72cm
=8. Darcy Gardner (Clarence) – 72cm
10. Oliver Davis (Clarence) – 71cm

Top 10 Average: 75.3cm
State Average:
64.8cm

Running Vertical Jump (L):

1. Will Peppin (North Hobart) – 86cm
2. Darcy Gardner (Clarence) – 83cm
3. Sam Tilley (Lauderdale) – 79cm
4. Jayden Hinds (Launceston) – 78cm
5. Isaac Chugg (Launceston) – 76cm
6. Jake Steele (North Hobart) – 75cm
7. Sam Collins (North Hobart) – 74cm
8. Sam Banks (Clarence) – 73cm
9. Lachlan Blakemore (Penguin) – 72cm
=10. 71cm x4

Top 10 Average: 76.7cm
State Average:
68.9cm

VICTORIA

Standing Vertical Jump:

1. Luke Gaudion (Eastern) – 84cm
2. Aidan Hare (Bendigo) – 76cm
=3. Josh Goater (Calder) – 73cm
=3. Jonah Potter (Northern) – 73cm
=3. Lachlan Carrigan (Sandringham) – 73cm
=6. Jonty Patrick (Calder) – 72cm
=6. Michael Ktona (Calder) – 72cm
=6. Giorgio Varagiannis (Oakleigh) – 72cm
=9. 71cm x3

Top 10 Average: 73.7cm
State Average:
57.2cm

Running Vertical Jump (R):

1. Archie Perkins (Sandringham) – 92cm
2. Giorgio Varagiannis (Oakleigh) – 89cm
3. Luke Kelvie (Oakleigh) – 88cm
=4. Lachlan Bond (Bendigo) – 85cm
=4. Scott Bielby (Oakleigh) – 85cm
=4. Dominic Akuei (Northern) – 85cm
=4. Harrison Keeling (Eastern) – 85cm
=8. 84cm x4

Top 10 Average: 86.1cm
State Average:
67.3cm

Running Vertical Jump (L):

1. Jamarra Ugle-Hagan (Oakleigh) – 93cm
2. Dominic Bedendo (Murray) – 91cm
=3. Noah Walsh (Bendigo) – 90cm
=3. Giacomo Thomas (Calder) – 90cm
=3. Lachlan Godden (Oakleigh) – 90cm
=3. Luke Gaudion (Eastern) – 90cm
=7. Nash Reynolds (Western) – 89cm
=7. Sam Berry (Gippsland) – 89cm
=7. Joshua Gibcus (GWV) – 89cm
=7. Noah Gadsby (Geelong) – 89cm

Top 10 Average: 90cm
State Average:
72.2cm

WESTERN AUSTRALIA

Standing Vertical Jump:

1. Tristan Hurford (Claremont) – 84cm
2. Seth Roberts (Claremont) – 82cm
3. Joel Western (Claremont) – 80cm
4. Zac Meloncelli (Perth) – 77cm
=5. Angus Fraser (South Fremantle) – 76cm
=5. Solomon James (South Fremantle) – 76cm
=5. Darcy Dixon (West Perth) – 76cm
=8. Aidan Hall (South Fremantle) – 75cm
=8. Caleb Stephens (South Fremantle) – 75cm
=8. Rohan Scurria (West Perth) – 75cm

Top 10 Average: 77.6cm
State Average:
58.3cm

Running Vertical Jump (R):

1. Chayse Grabe-Paparone (Subiaco) – 100cm
2. Noah Farrow (West Perth) – 95cm
3. Bailey Jenkin (Swan Districts) – 92cm
=4. Zac Trigwell (Peel Thunder) – 91cm
=4. Zac Sanderson (Perth) – 91cm
6. Rohan Scurria (West Perth) – 89cm
=7. Joel Western (Claremont) – 88cm
=7. Corey Warner (East Fremantle) – 88cm
9. Jordan Berry (West Perth) – 87cm
=10. 86cm x3

Top 10 Average: 90.7cm
State Average:
66.7cm

Running Vertical Jump (L):

1. Tristan Hurford (Claremont) – 99cm
=2. Brandon Walker (East Fremantle) – 94cm
=2. James Sullivan (Swan Districts) – 94cm
=4.Seth Roberts (Claremont) – 92cm
=4. Angus Fraser (South Fremantle) – 92cm
6. Joel Western (Claremont) – 91cm
=7. 90cm x5

Top 10 Average: 92.2cm
State Average:
71.3cm

OVERALL TOP 10’s

Standing Vertical Jump:

=1. Tristan Hurford (Claremont) – 84cm
=1. Luke Gaudion (Eastern Ranges) – 84cm
3. Seth Roberts (Claremont) – 82cm
=4. Joel Western (Claremont) – 80cm
=4. Lachlan Squire (GWS GIANTS Academy) – 80cm
=6. Jack Briskey (Brisbane Lions Academy) – 77cm
=6. Zac Meloncelli (Perth) – 77cm
=7. 76cm x6

Running Vertical Jump (R):

1. Chayse Grabe-Paparone (Subiaco) – 100cm
2. Noah Farrow (West Perth) – 95cm
=3. Bailey Jenkin (Swan Districts) – 92cm
=3. Matthew Borlace (Central District) – 92cm
=3. Archie Perkins (Sandringham) – 92cm
=6. Zac Trigwell (Peel Thunder) – 91cm
=6. Zac Sanderson (Perth) – 91cm
=8. 89cm x4

Running Vertical Jump (L):

1. Tristan Hurford (Claremont) – 99cm
=2. Brandon Walker (East Fremantle) – 94cm
=2. James Sullivan (Swan Districts) – 94cm
=4. Riley Buckland (Gold Coast SUNS Academy) – 93cm
=4. Jamarra Ugle-Hagan (Oakleigh) – 93cm
=6. Seth Roberts (Claremont) – 92cm
=6. Angus Fraser (South Fremantle) – 92cm
=8. Henry Read (Sturt) – 91cm
=8. Dominic Bedendo (Murray) – 91cm
=8. Joel Western (Claremont) – 91cm

STATE AGAINST STATE AVERAGES

Standing Vertical Jump:

1. QLD – 60.1cm
2. NSW – 59.8cm
3. SA – 58.5cm
4. WA – 58.3cm
5. VIC – 57.2cm
6. TAS – 56.4cm

Running Vertical Jump (R):

1. QLD – 68.4cm
2. VIC – 67.3cm
3. WA – 66.7cm
4. NSW – 66.2cm
5. SA – 66.1cm
6. TAS – 64.8cm

Running Vertical Jump (L):

1. VIC – 72.2cm
2. QLD – 71.6cm
3. NSW – 71.5cm
4. WA – 71.3cm
5. SA – 70.1cm
6. TAS – 68.9cm

Preseason testing analysis: Which State is the most agile?

THE current sporting hiatus serves as somewhat of an extended preseason for the nation’s brightest AFL Draft prospects, who will be itching to get back on the field. Aside from a few scratch matches on the eve of Round 1, much of the 2020 class has had little in the way of competition thus far.

But preseason testing always serves to get the competitive juices flowing, with players from each region and academy coming together to test where they rate athletically. Rookie Me hosted the preseason testing in Victoria, South Australia, Queensland and Tasmania, while the AFL completed testing in Western Australia and NSW/ACT.

In our next analysis of the results from those days around the country, we take a look at the agility test scores and try to answer the question of ‘Which State is the most agile?’. We have compiled the top 10 scores from each State, an overall top 10, and averages from around the nation to help answer the question. Stay tuned for results across each test in the near future.

>> SCROLL DOWN FOR THE OVERALL TOP 10

STATE TOP 10’s

New South Wales:

1. Jordan Endemann (Sydney Swans Academy) – 8.23 seconds
=2. Cooper Wilson (Sydney Swans Academy) – 8.26
=2. Oscar Davis (Sydney Swans Academy) – 8.26
4. Harry Grant (GWS GIANTS Academy) – 8.306
5. Matthew McKenzie (Sydney Swans Academy) – 8.36
6. Fraser Kelly (GWS GIANTS Academy) – 8.367
7. Thomas Longmire (Sydney Swans Academy) – 8.41
8. Harrison Grintell (GWS GIANTS Academy) – 8.414
9. Marco Rossmann (Sydney Swans Academy) – 8.43
10. Kai Watts (GWS GIANTS Academy) – 8.441

Top 10 Average: 8.347 seconds (6th)

The Swans Academy again makes up most of the NSW top 10, with six talents making up the list – including the entire top three. Jordan Endemann again showcased his athleticism with the quickest time, while top-aged academy standout Marco Rossmann also snuck into the rankings. Harry Grant was GWS’ niftiest mover, clocking up a 8.306-second effort, with 2019 Under-16 State MVP Kai Watts rounding out the list. NSW was one of just two states not to boast a time under eight seconds.

Queensland:

1. Tahj Abberley (Brisbane Lions Academy) – 7.84 seconds
=2. Darcy Prest (Brisbane Lions Academy) – 7.86
=2. Caleb Hammond (Brisbane Lions Academy) – 7.86
4. Riley Buckland (Gold Coast SUNS Academy) – 7.97
5. Kirk McGrory (Brisbane Lions Academy) – 8.18
6. Billy Evers (Gold Coast SUNS Academy) – 8.19
7. Damon Eastwell (Brisbane Lions Academy) – 8.22
8. Will Tasker (Brisbane Lions Academy) – 8.23
9. Lochlan Harrop (Brisbane Lions Academy) – 8.24
10. Shaye Walsh (Gold Coast SUNS Academy) – 8.25

Top 10 Average: 8.084 seconds (2nd)

It was hardly a surprise to see Tahj Abberley again not only feature among the elite ranks for Queensland, but to also claim top spot for his scintillating 7.84-second run. A number of players also made their second and third features on top 10 lists with fantastic times, as the Lions’ academy made up for 70 per cent of the top 10, including the entire podium. The Queenslanders’ elites were the second-quickest on average.

South Australia:

1. Lachlan Grubb (Central District) – 7.94 seconds
2. Connor Willsmore (Sturt) – 8.05
3. James Willis (North Adelaide) – 8.06
4. Nasiah Wanganeen (Glenelg) – 8.11
=5. Jordan Kasianowicz (WWT Eagles) – 8.16
=5. Connor Blackwell (West Adelaide) – 8.16
7. Luke Mitton (South Adelaide) – 8.20
8. Jacob Godden (WWT Eagles) – 8.24
=9. Antonio Zappia (Norwood) – 8.25
=9. Riley Hughes (Central District) – 8.25

Top 10 Average: 8.142 seconds (4th)

SA Academy Hub gun Lachlan Grubb utilised every bit of his athletics background to notch his state’s best time as the sole athlete to clock in at under eight seconds. He, and fellow Bulldog Riley Hughes bookended the 10, while the likes of Connor Willsmore and Luke Mitton made yet another appearance among the top ranks. The Croweaters were once again middle of the road overall through, coming in fourth when compared to other states’ best figures.

Tasmania:

1. Isaac Chugg (Launceston) – 8.04 seconds
2. Jayden Hinds (Launceston) – 8.14
3. Will Peppin (North Hobart) – 8.17
4. Kye Chilcott (Launceston) – 8.26
5. Oliver Davis (Clarence) – 8.29
=6. Sam Tilley (Lauderdale) – 8.31
=6. Sam Foley (Launceston) – 8.31
8. Jack Rand (Devonport) – 8.32
9. Patrick Walker (North Hobart) – 8.34
10. Darcy Gardner (Clarence) – 8.38

Top 10 Average: 8.256 seconds (5th)

Former athletics ace Isaac Chugg was yet again the standout for Tasmania with his outstanding time of 8.04 seconds, though he could not quite become the only Tasmanian to sneak in under eight seconds. Allies Academy Hub members Oliver Davis and Patrick Walker put in solid showings with their times of around the 8.30-second mark, while former Academy member Will Peppin featured on the podium.

Victoria:

1. Blake Reid (Geelong Falcons) – 7.76 seconds
2. Charlie Lazzaro (Geelong Falcons) –  7.79
3. Harrison White (Western Jets) – 7.83
4. Oliver Wiltshire (Geelong Falcons) – 7.90
=5. Harvey Gallagher (Bendigo Pioneers) – 7.92
=5. Sam Butler (GWV Rebels) – 7.92
7. Bailey Laurie (Oakleigh Chargers) – 7.97
8. Harrison Keeling (Eastern Ranges) – 7.98
=9. 7.99 x3

Top 10 Average: 7.905 seconds (1st)

The quickest top 10 on average across the nation was Victoria, which was the sole state to have every time clock in at under eight seconds. Geelong Falcons products stood out among the massive talent pool, featuring thrice in the top four, with Blake Reid and Charlie Lazzaro managing the best two times. Oakleigh midfield/forward jet Bailey Laurie also ran well, coming in seventh as one of two National Academy members on the list.

Western Australia:

1. Ty Sears (Swan Districts) – 7.92 seconds
2. Jayden Peak (East Perth) – 8.02
=3. Seth Roberts (Claremont) – 8.08
=3. Zac Sanderson (Perth) – 8.08
5. Bailey Jenkin (Swan Districts) – 8.14
6. Saverio Marafioti (West Perth) – 8.18
=7. Denver Grainger-Barras (Swan Districts) – 8.19
=7. Zach Fleiner (West Perth) – 8.19
=7. Rohan Scurria (West Perth) – 8.19
10. Lyle Sibasado (Swan Districts) – 8.22

Top 10 Average: 8.121 seconds (3rd)

One of the top states in terms of their elite runners was again Western Australia, despite only having one athlete run the test in less than eight seconds. Ty Sears was that player, topping the list as one of four Swan Districts products to feature. Top WA draft hopeful Denver Grainger-Barras was one of three players to manage a time of 8.19 seconds, impressive for a key defender.

OVERALL TOP 10

1. Blake Reid (Geelong Falcons) – 7.76 seconds
2. Charlie Lazzaro (Geelong Falcons) –  7.79
3. Harrison White (Western Jets) – 7.83
4. Tahj Abberley (Brisbane Lions Academy) – 7.84
=5. Darcy Prest (Brisbane Lions Academy) – 7.86
=5. Caleb Hammond (Brisbane Lions Academy) – 7.86
7. Oliver Wiltshire (Geelong Falcons) – 7.90
=8. Harvey Gallagher (Bendigo Pioneers) – 7.92
=8. Sam Butler (GWV Rebels) – 7.92
=8. Ty Sears (Swan Districts) – 7.92

An absolutely rapid top 10 was dominated by Victorians, who made up for each podium place and over half of the list overall. Reid and Lazzaro were joined by Harrison White in the top three, with Queenslander Abberley the best non-Victorian runner, followed by two of his fellow Brisbane Academy teammates. Sears made it three states represented, sneaking into the 10 as the lone West Australian.

STATE AGAINST STATE:

1. Queensland – 8.55
2. Victoria – 8.56
3. Tasmania – 8.69
4. South Australia – 8.76
5. NSW/ACT – 8.82
6. Western Australia – 8.89

While Victoria may have dominated the top 10, having the largest talent pool brought its overall average down – albeit only to second place. Queensland proved the best state for sideways movement, edging into top spot while Tasmania filled out the podium. In a change from the yo-yo and 20m sprint results, Western Australia and NSW/ACT were the worst ranked states, even despite the former boasting a very good top 10.