Tag: Oakleigh Chargers

2021 NAB League Girls Grand Final preview: Oakleigh Chargers vs. Geelong Falcons

AFTER 10 home-and-away rounds and two enthralling weeks of postseason action, the NAB League Girls Grand Final is upon us. Minor premier and competition benchmark, Oakleigh Chargers, will take on Geelong Falcons on Sunday afternoon in Werribee, as the top Metro and Country regions battle for premiership glory. With both regions completing their final training sessions last night, the teams are in and raring to go. We preview the big day, looking at form, highlighting the key matchups, and getting word from both sides.

NAB LEAGUE GIRLS GRAND FINAL

Oakleigh Chargers vs. Geelong Falcons
Sunday May 16, 2:00pm
Avalon Airport Oval, Werribee

Home-and-away records:

Oakleigh – 1st, 7-1, 228.4%
Geelong – 6th, 5-3, 128.6%

Last 5:

Oakleigh – 4-1
Geelong – 4-1

Previous meeting:
Round 8, 2021: Geelong 5.4 (34) def. Oakleigh 3.5 (23)

The Falcons threw a spanner in the works on the eve of the season break, handing Oakleigh its first loss for the year to the tune of 11 points. Despite leading at the first break, the Chargers fell behind as Geelong took hold in a three goals to nil second term, forming the foundations of a momentous win.

Geelong’s one-two punch of Poppy Schaap and Tess Craven proved pivotal through midfield, as spearhead forward Renee Tierney got busy in attack and the dynamic defensive duo of Annie Lee and Elizabeth Dowling was a constant obstacle for Oakleigh.

Chargers skipper Charlie Rowbottom spent more time up forward but finished as her side’s equal-top ball winner alongside Amanda Ling, as Charlotte Taylor enjoyed some time on-ball. Usual suspects Brooke Vickers and Stella Reid were also productive, but could not drag their side over the line.

The result did little to derail the Oakleigh express, as they charged on to a minor premiership and now, grand final qualification. For the Falcons, it proved a key point in their timely peak towards the end of the season, with both sides coming in off 4-1 runs and a bed of confidence.

Key take-outs:

Oakleigh:

“It was obviously a pretty good game out in Geelong and it gave our girls a good insight into the Geelong team. “We obviously couldn’t get the job done that day but it’ll give us some confidence going into the game on Sunday that we have played them before and we know a little bit about them. “A lot of the other teams we’ve played, for example Eastern (last week) we hadn’t played against before, so it was like going in unseen.” – Regional talent operations lead, Jy Bond.

Geelong:

“It does (fill us with confidence) knowing that we can take it to the best teams in the competition. “The style that we want to play, if we can bring that we know it matches up against most teams and keeps us in games. “That’s what we’ve talked about, making sure that we don’t stray away from that too much and just have trust in how we want to play and what we want to do.” – Talent pathways head coach, Paul Corrigan.

Teams:

Geelong Falcons:

FF: #4 P. Schaap, #39 R. Tierney, #18 K. Stacey
HF: #14 Z. Garth, #15 G. Featherston, #29 M. Van Dyke
C: #13 M. Courtney, #11 T. Craven, #26 I. Houtsma
HB: #23 E. Dowling, #46 A. McKee, #37 A. Lee
FB: #20 A. McKeegan, #32 M. Featherston, #33 T. Morrow
FOL: #38 K. Hardingham, #44 C. Simpson, #9 A. Van Loon

BENCH: #25 C. Adams, #2 C. Hardy, #6 T. Hassett, #45 T. Lewis, #22 A. Sanderson
EMG: #1 C. Bottomley, #5 S. Howley, #8 E. Perrett

Oakleigh Chargers:

FB: #23 C. Matthews, #5 M. Clift, #4 A. McCulloch
HB: #6 Z. O’Sullivan, #7 C. Taylor, #16 E. Woodford
C: #37 C. van der Vlies, #29 A. Ling, #9 Brooke Vickers
HF: #22 J. Jackson, #15 A. Smith, #10 S. Reid
FF: #31 S. Morley, #8 Charlie Rowbottom, #13 T. Morton
FOL: #3 K. Kearns, #33 J. Fleming, #34 L. Hart

BENCH: #1 L. Boyd Singer, #38 E. Harvey, #14 E. James, #19 J. McCormack, #28 A. Russell
EMG: #36 K. James, #24 H. Kenealy

The stars:
Charlie Rowbottom (Oakleigh)

The skipper and potentially the best player in the entire draft pool, Rowbottom was a lock for this slot. The explosive midfielder-forward is one of the many Chargers who can rotate through multiple roles; setting the tone in midfield and providing a contested marking threat inside attacking 50. She has started at full forward in recent weeks before rolling further afield, but proves impactful just about anywhere she goes. Come finals time, the players who can produce special moments or put a side on their back are the ones who stand out, Rowbottom is one of them.

Tess Craven (Geelong)

Arguably the best player in this year’s finals series to date, Craven has proven her worth as a genuine AFLW draft prospect. The tough and reliable midfielder perfectly embodies Geelong’s style; able to win her own ball and provide good pressure on the inside, before working hard on the outer to maintain possession and continue her side’s forward momentum. Craven’s decision making and short kicking game also comes into effect in general play, as she brings a strong accumulative factor around the ground. Having been best afield in her last two outings, Craven is one to stand up on the big stage.

The X-factor:
Jasmine Fleming (Oakleigh) & Ingrid Houtsma (Geelong)

There is always a feel good story come finals time, and that is the case to some extent for either team this time around. Jasmine Fleming has been a terrific addition for Oakleigh, fitting seamlessly into an elite midfield and boasting the added string of forward craft. The bottom-ager, who is also a fine cricketer, debuted in Round 9 and returned last week for another sensational showing, making her impossible to look past for the grand final squad. For Geelong, Ingrid Houtsma makes an incredibly timely return after being forced out via a head knock, named on a wing for Sunday’s game. She is a versatile type who can play on each line, impacting with each possession.

The systems:

Oakleigh:

“We play our girls through a variety of positions to enable them to be seen by the AFLW recruiters… it’s not by designing those rotations on winning games, it’s more about exposing them to new positions and finding out where they fit and what’s going to put them in the best position to get drafted. “We’re at the stage now where we’ll use those girls in the most damaging positions to perform best on the big stage. “If you’re in the big dance it’s one more time to show your ability to AFLW recruiters.” – Jy Bond

Geelong:

“We’re strong with what we want to bring with our pressure around the ball and in the contest as well. “We feel that if we can match it in there and then get the ball to the outside, our strengths as a group are that we can move the ball quickly, get it inside 50 and we know we’ve got lots of options that can hit the scoreboard as well.

“I think the last two games in finals, it was a really tough tussle against Greater Western Victoria last week, a really strong contested-type game with high pressure inside. “The Dandenong game too, we were able to get the ball to the outside, gain field position forward of centre and get some inside 50s and were able to score as well. – Paul Corrigan

Final words:

Oakleigh:

“I’m really proud of the way the girls have handled this year. “It’s been a pretty busy year for our coaches, staff and the girls, and we couldn’t be happier with how they’ve progressed through the year and just kept getting better week by week. “That’s all we can hope for, that they can go out there, have fun and hopefully for them they get the job done. “If they don’t we’ll celebrate the season regardless.” – Jy Bond

Geelong:

“We’re looking forward as a club on Sunday to putting our best foot forward and I’m pretty proud with the way our girls have gone about it and all our staff as well. “Win, lose, or draw we’ll be looking to do our best, but we understand too that Oakleigh is a very strong side and we have to bring our best on Sunday to match it against them.” – Paul Corrigan

Top Performers: 2021 NAB League Girls – Preliminary Finals

THE 2021 NAB League Girls grand finalists were decided on Saturday, via an enthralling double-header at Avalon Airport Oval. Our weekly (self explanatory) Top Performers series delves into some of the best individual feats across each weekend of action. This week produced plenty of highlights as players continue to impress in the elite talent pathway. Starting with AFLW Academy-listed prospects, we take a look at the top performers out of an exciting set of fixtures.

Each game’s top performers are the opinion of the individual writer.

OAKLEIGH CHARGERS 6.10 (46) def. EASTERN RANGES 1.9 (15)

AFLW ACADEMY:

#8 Charlie Rowbottom (Oakleigh Chargers)

Starting each quarter up forward as she has done for the past few games, Rowbottom continues to be a commanding presence wherever she lines up on field. She lead well in the forwardline, and whilst not always holding the mark she would generally knock it to the advantage of teammates to run onto. When she got a clean opportunity inside forward 50, she was far more keen to pass it off to other teammates than take shots herself. She showed off her power around stoppages and on the inside with some good burst to run onto and win the contested ball, even delivering a few fend-offs in the third quarter. She came out comfortably on top over any player that tried to run with her through the midfield, able to cover the ground and work hard to get back and help in defence better than her opponents.

TOP PERFORMERS:

#14 Eliza James (Oakleigh Chargers)

Looked dangerous in the forward 50, with her past two games having been good performances, just missing the finishing touch at times. James looks really good with her leap, and whilst not dragging in every mark, she managed to get a touch on more often than not, tapping it to players on the ground. She is no slouch with her own work at ground level either, having a few clean one-grab pick ups in the forward 50.

#33 Jasmine Fleming (Oakleigh Chargers)

It is unbelievable to think that this was just her second appearance at this level. Looking comfortably one of Oakleigh’s best players and biggest ball winner for the game, Fleming was a force through the midfield. Her work around stoppages was particularly good, winning the first of the day with a good burst of speed straight through the pack, before continuing that throughout the game. She had one of the plays of the day where she won the ball on the wing, took a bounce whilst burning an opponent and kicked it to the top of the 50, then ran past to receive the handball and then delivered it well to Charlie Rowbottom, who unfortunately missed the goal. That precision kicking and hard running for handball receives was a constant through the game, making all of her disposals damaging.

#16 Erin Woodford (Oakleigh Chargers)

After an impressive showing last week against a taller Calder forwardline, Woodford followed up, playing a crucial part in the backline. She positioned well behind the play, taking a few intercept marks without much issue before looking to kick long forward to numbers. Woodford also positioned well in contests to get front position, meaning she could run onto the ball if it was spoiled by opponents.

#10 Stella Reid (Oakleigh Chargers)

Having moved up forward for gradually longer stints over the season, it appears Reid is fully comfortable as a mainstay in the Chargers’ forwardline now, becoming a regular and reliable goal kicker, and target in the forward 50. Her leading patterns are impressive, particularly given she does not need much time or space to make things happen, reacting quicker than her opponents to get to good spots without much pressure, while also working them over. She was also good at looking for teammates inside 50 rather than blazing away.

#9 Mia Busch (Eastern Ranges)

Busch has been a highlight for Eastern over the season and continued to live up to that against the Chargers, once again showing exceptional positioning behind the ball. She constantly moved towards it to get an intercept possession higher up the ground, taking it at speed and then kicking forward, looking to put it in front of leading teammates. The bottom-ager moved into the midfield in the final quarter and looked more than comfortable, suggesting a positional switch for season 2022.

#44 Georgia Campbell (Eastern Ranges)

Whilst she struggled to have the impact around the ground she has become renowned for, Campbell took advantage of her superior athleticism in the ruck to win almost every ruck contest she was involved in, with a game high 27 hitouts being her biggest return for the year. Even though she did not win a whole heap of ball around the ground, her follow up work around stoppages was impressive, getting low a few times and firing out handballs to teammates running past.

#4 Keeley Sherar (Eastern Ranges)

A few factors have set Sherar out as a prospect for this season, with her burst of speed and ability to find the ball two of them. She managed to show those off once again in her last NAB League game for the season. What was also impressive from Sherar was the fact she was an aerial threat around the ground, showing off an impressive leap when required. While she seems to favour kicking, her hands in close are really impressive, with the ability to spot teammates through traffic and find a way to get it to them.

OTHERS:

Alexandra McCulloch was impressive in defence for the Chargers, almost playing as an extra midfielder at times with how high she got up the ground. Amanda Ling and Brooke Vickers, whilst not as prolific as usual, were still influential for Oakleigh in the win, as was Charlotte Van der Vlies. For the Ranges, Bridget Deed was a strong winner on the inside for the day, offering assistance in defence as well. Matilda Hardy had arguably her best performance for the season on the wing, having some moments where she showed off her pace.

GEELONG FALCONS 5.6 (36) def. GWV REBELS 3.4 (22)

AFLW ACADEMY:

#20 Ella Friend (GWV)

Had a difficult day looking for ways to get in it, being thrown about from the forwardline, to the wing, to the backline on multiple occasions. Although she struggled to get much of the ball or show off her usual high-level marking, Friend still commanded a player constantly on her and used the ball well when she did find it.

#30 Nyakoat Dojiok (GWV)

Starting the game in her usual backline role, Dojiok tried her best to intercept and impact the ball to different levels of success early on. She nabbed one particularly memorable intercept possession in the second quarter along the wing, where she went for a run and bombed it deep inside forward 50 to give GWV a chance to score. She moved into the midfield for a short period in the second half which worked wonders for her, and the Rebels, winning the contested ball with ease as a taller player through the engine room. She even got herself a goal for her troubles. That move looked to have given her confidence, as she returned the backline and looked far more assured and confident in her attack on the ball.

TOP PERFORMERS:

#5 Paige Scott (GWV Rebels)

It may have been her final game of the year at NAB League level, but fans and recruiters alike should be excited that we get one more year of Scott with the Rebels. After an impressive showing in the Country representative games, she came back to the NAB League in hot form, kicking five goals prior to the match with Geelong. She started the game in the midfield, winning the first clearance with ease and setting the tone for a really strong display. She continued to show her strengths, taking some contested grabs as a forward and looking dangerous on the lead. What was most impressive about this game was her increased work-rate and intensity, where her second and third efforts got her a second goal. In that instance, she dropped a mark but followed up with a tackle, knocking the ball loose and then putting it through the middle. She looked strong as a contested ball winner, running in and bursting out of the pack, then kicking long to get space.

#11 Tess Craven (Geelong Falcons)

Would have to be the form player of the competition currently, and is timing her run superbly as she helped book the Falcons spot in the grand final next week. Craven showed off immense stoppage craft all game, as one who regularly timed her runs to hit the ball with speed when it left the rucks’ hands, taking advantage of knowing where the ball was going each time. Once she started, she looked near impossible to stop. It has been noted previously that she is good at hitting those shorter kicks rather than bombing long, and she continued doing that this game, looking for and finding those kicks that would’ve been no more than 15 or 20 meters. They put the Falcons in a better spots to move forward. Craven showed she knows when to handball or kick as well, balancing well between them and not being overly reliant on either skill.

#44 Charlotte Simpson (Geelong Falcons)

A really consistent ball winner and strong inside player for the game, Simpson’s strength and ability to stand strong in tackles was extremely impressive. She would also get her arms free in those situations, where she was able to handball off to a teammate in space, or throw it on the boot to keep the Falcons moving forward. She was sound defensively around stoppages as well, regularly wrapping up Rebels players that broke free with the ball.

#2 Tahlia Meier (GWV Rebels)

Meier is one of those zippy small players that just excites with her speed, agility and work-rate around the ground, especially the forward 50. That work-rate was highlighted constantly, as she kept going for second, third, and fourth efforts when around the ball, and it led to some almost moments in the forward half, where she almost broke away and got a goal at times, but the Falcons’ defensive setup kept her from snaring a major score.

#15 Chloe Leonard (GWV Rebels)

Leonard has been one of the most consistent performers for GWV this season, and she stood up through the midfield for them against the Falcons in what will be her last game for the Rebels. Leonard positioned well throughout the game, sweeping up or marking uncontested hack kicks forward from the Falcons, but also attending stoppages to be a handball receive option before delivering well measured kicks forward.

#4 Poppy Schaap (Geelong Falcons)

Schaap struggled to get into the game early, held well by the bottom-aged Rebel Molly Walton in the first quarter, not something she has had to deal with of late. It did not last long though, as Schaap started to work more and more up the ground to get involved outside the forward 50, impacting every contest she was near – either winning the ball herself or laying a tackle to get it to spill for a teammate. Once again she looked good using the footy, with her quick hands to teammates in space particularly impressive.

#37 Annie Lee (Geelong Falcons)

Lee continued on from her good home-and-away season form. As arguably the biggest aerial threat afield, she punished the Rebels early on when they attempted to kick inside 50 without penetration behind their kicks. As usual, she used the ball effectively by foot as well, being another one that looked to move the ball into more central spots to open up the ground going forward.

OTHERS:

Molly Walton and Lilli Condon were two more that stood up at times through the contest for GWV, with Walton continuing to be an essential part of the Rebels’ defence and Condon showing off her speed and inside ball winning. For the Falcons, there were plenty of others that contributed well. Kara Stacey and Ash Van Loon were two that went through the midfield at times and provided a bit of spark. Renee Tierney was opportunistic in the forwardline, rewarding well placed kicks from midfielders and hitting the scoreboard.

2021 NAB League Girls: Preliminary Finals wrap – Chargers, Falcons reach decider

THE Oakleigh Chargers and Geelong Falcons progressed to the 2021 NAB League Girls grand final with respective wins in the weekend’s preliminary finals bouts. In a double-header at Avalon Airport Oval on Saturday, the Chargers lived up to their minor premier tag to advance in dominant fashion over Eastern, while the Falcons were impressive in their ability to hold off a plucky Greater Western Victoria (GWV) outfit. We recap both games from what was a super Saturday of elite talent pathways action.

OAKLEIGH CHARGERS 1.3 | 2.6 | 4.9 | 6.10 (46)
EASTERN RANGES 1.4 | 1.5 | 1.7 | 1.9 (15)

Oakleigh Chargers became the first side to qualify for this year’s NAB League Girls grand final, via a convincing 31-point victory over Eastern Ranges. The minor premiers found themselves behind at the first break, but began to flex their muscle thereafter by keeping the Ranges goalless across three terms, while pouring on scoreboard pressure with 12 more scoring shots of their own. Ultimately, the 6.10 (46) to 1.9 (15) result only officially confirmed Oakleigh’s status as the top team in this year’s Metro pool, with eyes now on the top gong overall in next week’s decider.

Winning skipper Charlie Rowbottom lead her side superbly, rotating through the midfield from up forward to finish with 18 disposals, seven tackles, and three marks in a bullocking display. Fellow midfielder-forwards Eliza James (15 disposals, two goals) and Stella Reid (13 and two) were also impactful throughout Oakleigh’s charge, while second-gamer Jasmine Fleming topped her side’s disposal count with 22, including four inside 50s. Down back, Alexandra McCulloch and Erin Woodford were resolute, helping restrict the Ranges to just one major. Bottom-age jet Jemma Rigoni may be a bad luck story on the injury front, having ended the game on crutches.

Eastern was served well by a bunch of reliable figures, including Keeley Sherar in midfield. She found the ball 14 times but won it in important areas and looked to make each touch count. Mia Busch was kept busy in an under-siege defence, leading all comers with 24 disposals and seven marks in what was an exciting sighter for next year from the rebounding ace. Grace Walsh also played an important hand in a tough role down back, while the likes of Tilly Hardy (15 disposals) and Bridget Deed (18) worked hard, as did athletic ruck prospect, Georgia Campbell for 27 hitouts.

Oakleigh’s near-unblemished season rolls on to the big dance, with Geelong awaiting. The Falcons are the only side to beat the Chargers in 2021, so redemption may well prove a theme in Oakleigh’s effort. On the other hand, Eastern’s year comes to an end but the Ranges can be proud of a campaign where it seemed the squad extracted the best out of itself, finishing as the second-ranked Metro side.

GOALS:

Oakleigh: E. James 2, S. Reid 2, T. Morton, S. Morley
Eastern: G. Wilson

DC BEST:

Oakleigh: C. Rowbottom, E. James, J. Fleming, E. Woodford, S. Reid, A. McCulloch
Eastern: K. Sherar, M. Busch, G. Campbell, M. Hardy, G. Walsh, B. Deed

Eastern's Georgia Campbell competes with Oakleigh's Kalarni Kearns in the ruck

GEELONG FALCONS 1.1 | 3.6 | 5.6 | 5.6 (36)
GWV REBELS 1.0 | 1.1 | 3.1 | 3.4 (22)

Geelong Falcons held off a gallant GWV Rebels side on Saturday to earn top honours in the Country pool and advance to this year’s NAB League Girls grand final. The Falcons rode out tense moments and spurts of momentum belonging to the Rebels, making better of their own opportunities to come away 14-point victors. That theme was most evident during term three, where GWV looked like breaking back into the game, and potentially ahead, but could not quite overcome Geelong’s mix of class and solidity. A goalless final quarter saw the result finish 5.6 (36) to 3.4 (22) in favour of Geelong, with neither team losing any admirers for their efforts.

Falcons midfielder Tess Craven may well be the finals MVP at this point after another outstanding outing, leading all comers with 24 disposals and five marks, as well as three behinds. Aiding her in the engine room, Charlotte Simpson also ticked over 20 touches and Ash Van Loon got her hands dirty with 11 tackles in a typically strong display. Annie Lee (17 disposals, five marks) proved resolute as ever down back, as the forward combination of Renee Tierney (two goals) and Poppy Schaap (18 disposals, seven tackles, 1.2) caused plenty of headaches for the opposition.

GWV had an even spread of contributors, with leaders like Chloe Leonard (14 disposals, eight tackles) and Lilli Condon (12 and five) stepping up to the plate. Nyakoat Dojiok also ran through midfield and managed to kick a rare goal to give her side a momentary lift. Tahlia Meier proved dangerous forward of centre, as did dual goalkicker Paige Scott who got even busier once shifted to the forwardline. Down back, the presence of Molly Walton (13 kicks, six rebound 50s) was also important in helping repel some of Geelong’s attacks, while Kalani Scoullar commanded the ruck with 37 hitouts.

Geelong’s second grand final appearance in four seasons will pose a difficult task against Oakleigh, though the Falcons have already knocked off their future opponents in 2021. Having peaked at an ideal time, the Falcons are a good chance to go all the way. GWV’s incredible finals run comes to an end, having toppled Tasmania in week one and given the Falcons a red hot run in their final appearance.

GOALS:

Geelong: R. Tierney 2, P. Schaap, C. Adams, Z. Garth
GWV: P. Scott 2, N. Dojiok

DC BEST:

Geelong: T. Craven, C. Simpson, A. Lee, P. Schaap, R. Tierney, A. Van Loon
GWV: P. Scott, T. Meier, C. Leonard, N. Dojiok, K. Scoullar, M. Walton

Geelong midfielder Tess Craven fires off a handball

Head-to-head: 2021 NAB League Round 2 – Tyler Sonsie vs. Nick Daicos

THE 2021 NAB League season rolls on into Round 2 on the weekend, with six games split evenly across Saturday and Sunday. Headlining the matchups is an all-Metro double-header at Preston City Oval on Saturday afternoon, which will be capped by an exciting clash between the Eastern Ranges and Oakleigh Chargers.

In a brand new series, we delve into the most eye-catching head-to-head matchups set to take place during the next round of action, starting with an absolute blockbuster. Having earned co-captaincy in the Draft Central Round 1 Team of the Week, top five prospects Tyler Sonsie (Eastern) and Nick Daicos (Oakleigh) are poised to lock horns this week in a mouthwatering midfield battle. Both are also AFL Academy members.

Neither player really requires an introduction, but below are the key points which aim to compare and contrast these two elite talents.

JOURNEY SO FAR:

Sonsie already boasts a terrific resume and should be well-known to keen NAB League watchers. The Eastern prospect proved his credentials by taking out Vic Metro’s MVP award at the 2019 Under 16 National Championships, before later earning his Ranges Under 18 debut. He would go on to play six games as a wingman/forward, averaging 11 disposals and a goal every other game while also featuring in the Ranges’ grand final loss to Oakleigh.

Daicos is another name who is already well-hyped, but has seen a touch less top-level exposure through the Victorian talent pathways. His name speaks for itself – the son of Peter and brother of Josh – so Collingwood fans are understandably excited to see their latest father-son prospect. He more than held his own in the APS Football competition alongside the likes of Matt Rowell and Noah Anderson, and was set to join the Chargers’ program last year. Instead, we had to wait until last week for his maiden NAB League outing (it was worth the wait).

PRESEASON: 

Both players had interrupted preseasons but were quite obviously raring to go in Round 1. Sonsie had some back issues at the end of 2020 which carried on into early-2021, but he shook them off to get back up to speed. Daicos went through minor ankle surgery last September and spent some time getting his confidence back in the lead up to his NAB League debut. He did not participate in the preseason testing event, but ran out in a Collingwood VFL practice match and impressed. That form carried on into Round 1.

POSITION:

Both players will predominantly run through midfield this season and proved as much last week. There are some slight differences in their secondary positions, though. While Sonsie is more of a midfielder who rests forward, Daicos is a midfielder who also rolls off half-back and looks to open up play from there. Despite that, we did see Daicos spend a good amount of time up forward in Round 1 after he copped an early leg knock. Both players took full toll during their time inside attacking 50 last week, with Sonsie classily converting two late goals on his non-preferred side and Daicos slotting three majors from a half-dozen attempts.

SIZE AND STYLE:

These two should measure up quite well against each other, with both between 180-185cm and shaping up relatively similarly weight-wise. In terms of style, they bring some real class to the game each time the ball is in their hands and use it brilliantly by hand and foot. They are both so smooth in possession and while they are not overtly strong, can extract and come away from congestion beautifully. Daicos’ half-back work and Round 1 showing point towards having a greater defensive acumen, whereas Sonsie is perhaps a touch more forward-thinking, more often. Like two heavyweights slugging it out in the ring, this bout should be a great watch for the neutral – if you’re not too big a fan of defence.

IMPROVEMENT AREAS:

While breaking the game open is something Daicos can clearly do, one of his goals this year is to do that even more. His bursting clearance at the first centre bounce last week, and work rate to win the ball in dangerous areas points towards that being a factor going forward. He is a team driven player too, so will look to bring his teammates into the game.

As alluded to above, Sonsie is working on his defensive transition and endurance base. While his attacking acumen is so effective, applying that tackling pressure and becoming more relevant going the other way is the next step in Sonsie’s development. He has no trouble finding the ball and slides away from congestion with ease, but will be more inclined to rip away contested ball as he puts on more size.

ROUND 1:

Stats:

Daicos – 28 disposals (20 kicks), 8 marks, 7 tackles, 2 inside 50s, 3 rebound 50s, 3.2
Sonsie – 34 disposals (20 kicks), 6 marks, 2 tackles, 6 inside 50s, 2 rebound 50s, 2.1

Scout Notes:

Daicos – “In his NAB League debut, Daicos showed the hype was justified with a best on ground performance against perhaps the team to beat this year in Sandringham. Daicos was superb in the midfield, winning the ball at will and showing great skill and speed when in possession.

Daicos started the game perfectly with the game’s first clearance and showed his forward craft, kicking a well-struck set shot from 45 metres out. His second goal came from a set shot from 50 metres in the third quarter, and his third and final goal came in the last quarter with a terrific crumbing effort where he hit the ball at speed and kicked the goal quicker than a hiccup.

With an early corky, Daicos had to spend a bit of time at deep forward in the second half but he still looked so damaging whenever he went near the ball. Daicos finished the game with 28 disposals, eight marks, seven tackles and kicked 3.2 in a best on ground performance.” – Ed Pascoe

Sonsie – “Sonsie reminded everyone why he is considered one of the top five prospects in the 2021 draft with a dominant display in the midfield, showing his trademark attacking nature and class in a strong four-quarter performance. Sonsie was a clearance specialist in the first quarter, winning plenty of the ball in-close and dishing off cleanly by hand. It wasn’t his usual style of winning the ball and attacking by foot, but he was effective nonetheless.

Sonsie had a few running shots on goal in the first half and didn’t quite nail them as he usually would, biting off a bit more than he could chew with some opposite foot kicks, but he would address those issues in the last quarter. Sonsie is usually flawless in his kick execution on both sides and it all finally clicked in the last quarter as he kicked two sensational goals on his non-preferred.

The first was a classy rove and snap from a stoppage and the second came after he won a centre clearance and then followed that very clearance up with a running shot at goal from 40-metres out. Sonsie put on a show, finishing the gamer with 34 disposals, six inside 50s and two goals.” – Ed Pascoe

FINAL WORD:

This battle looms as a much-watch for draft followers, with two potential top five picks set lock horns while they look to be in scary form. The match itself should also be a ripping contest, with Eastern coming off a win and Oakleigh keen to rectify its Round 1 loss to Sandringham. Should Daicos be fully over the knock he sustained last week, he will likely get a massive run through midfield once again, right alongside the irresistible class of Sonsie.

Confident Chargers looking sharp despite preseason disruptions

OAKLEIGH Chargers regional talent operations lead, Jy Bond says his troops are “looking sharp” ahead of what is set to be a whirlwind 2021 NAB League Girls season, starting February 6. The Chargers have undertaken a changing of the guard with Bond now overseeing both the girls and boys programs, and new coach Jason Davenport tasked with the same duty. Despite an elongated break and some disruptions during preseason, Bond says he is happy with the progress shown ahead of season proper.

“It’s been pretty interesting, obviously coming back after COVID having hired a coach (Marco Bello), then that coach left then we had to hire a new one (Davenport)… so that was pretty disruptive,” he said. “Having said that, the boys and girls still had a pretty good preseason and they’ve been working hard. “The girls looking really sharp, which is great. They’ve been training well, we’ll probably have a pretty competitive team again with a fair few top end talents running around so we’re pretty confident.”

With no time for practice matches, each region is relying on match-simulation and intraclub hitouts to help bring their players back up to speed after nearly a whole year away from competitive action. Expectations are being tapered, but after a promising 2020 campaign was cut short, the Chargers are hopeful they can compete at a high level once again.

“We’re putting no pressure on the girls,” Bond said. “We’ve said from the start it’s about enjoyment, developing and having fun. We’re not really worried about the score, we’re more worried about the girls getting out there and having a having a crack because they haven’t played in around 10 months.

“We’re not really expecting them to come out and play at their best straight away, but we’re hopeful that with a few weeks they’ll be back at sort of the level where they left off last year.”

“We’ve just got to make sure that we look after the health and well-being of the girls and we’re not really prepared to put them into that sort of match situation so early, but we’ll do a lot of match simulation and small-sided match practice at trainings to make sure they’re right for Round 1.”

While on-field success was difficult to measure in just two games, albeit with an average winning margin of 76 points, Oakleigh can still put a sizeable tick next to 2020 given its presence at the draft. Three Chargers were selected within the first 26 picks of the AFL Women’s draft, adding to the six graduates taken within 23 picks on the men’s side. In the modest words of Bond, it made for a “pretty good result” overall.

Alice (O’Loughlin) was a bit of a surprise packet, we knew that she was definitely capable,” he said. “I know (former coach) Luke O’Shannessy was a big wrap for her, she’s definitely got a great athletic profile and it seems like she’s going really well down at North Melbourne. “We were obviously pretty confident of Mimi (Hill) going quite high. She’s just been an exceptional player for us over the last two years and then Joanna Lin, I think I was quietly confident about Joanna and I know Luke and I we do really love the way she went about it. “I watched a couple of games last year and I was really impressed with her courage… she’s definitely got something to offer so for her to go to Collingwood was a great result.”

Despite the turnaround of top-age guns the departure of some promising multi-sport athletes, Oakleigh is well-stocked across the board. Arguably atop the region’s talent pool is Charlie Rowbottom, the sister of Sydney midfielder James. She is one of many draft-eligible prospects Bond identified as promising after putting in strong preseasons.

“We’ve got Charlie Rowbottom, probably one of the most talented girls on our list at the moment,” Bond said. “Kalarni Kearns is another one who’s thereabouts, Amanda Ling is strong midfielder that we’re hopeful that will develop this year, Stella Reid is another player who has shown an exceptional amount of skill and ability to read the play over summer, Taylah Morton we’re looking to play in a few different roles this year, (and) Eliza James is definitely up there, she’s had a great preseason. “So we’ve certainly got some talented girls running around, we’re pretty excited with the girls to be honest.”

Others on the radar, albeit not yet of draft age include some potential father-daughter selections. 2004-births Gabriella Rawlings (daughter of Jade) and Jemma Rigoni (Guy) are part of the program along with Jasmine Fleming, the daughter of former Australian Test cricketer, Damien. Another middle-ager, Ruby Vanden-Boom is a developing tall who the Chargers will also look to utilise this season. She is quite “raw” according to Bond and also competes as a high-level rower.

Fleming, a promising cricketer, is one of a few players who will be rested for this weekend’s preseason testing event, but Bond says there are no glaring injury clouds over the squad heading into Round 1. The leadership group has been voted on by the players, set to be announced at the club’s jumper presentation night shortly.

Featured Image: Charlie Rowbottom in action last year | Credit: Solstice Digital & Photography

2020 AFL Draft recap: Melbourne Demons

MELBOURNE’S rollercoaster 2020 season ended in a ninth place finish and the lingering feeling of disappointment, but a sense of assuredness was somewhat restored as the Demons managed to gain two first round picks in this year’s draft. The move to trade back up the order and bring in a trio of top 35 talents marked a job well done, as a couple of classy smalls were joined by a developable tall prospect in what was an all-local draft haul. With a couple of spots potentially remaining open on the outside and in Melbourne’s front half, these players may well get a senior chance in their debut seasons.

MELBOURNE

National Draft:
#21 Jake Bowey (Sandringham Dragons/Vic Metro)
#22 Bailey Laurie (Oakleigh Chargers/Vic Metro)
#34 Fraser Rosman (Sandringham Dragons/Vic Metro)

Rookies:
Nil.

Consecutive first round picks opened the show for Melbourne, who looked to have had running machine, Max Holmes snatched from under their noses by Geelong immediately beforehand. Nonetheless, his former Sandringham Dragons teammate Jake Bowey marked a great first selection followed by a slight slider in Bailey Laurie, who was linked to GWS’ picks in the teens.

Bowey is a tough 175cm prospect with clean skills and great speed and agility. He can play a number of roles but made the wing his own as a bottom-ager and also has the potential to develop as a small forward. Laurie is similarly brilliant skill-wise, particularly by foot, known to carve up the opposition with his baulks and forward carry. The 179cm Oakleigh Chargers graduate achieved premiership success with the side in 2019 and along with Bowey, should have fans quickly warm to him.

The selection of Fraser Rosman, another Sandringham product, proved Melbourne’s final point of call at the draft and was a more prospective pick than the previous two. At 194cm, Rosman is an athletic marvel with great speed, endurance, and vertical ability which translates to his versatility. His size suggests he can own the forward 50 arc in future, but Rosman is also capable of rolling further afield. He has had little exposure with only two NAB League appearances last year, with his draft bolt coming on the back of promising preseason performances.

Melbourne was one of the rare sides not to make any rookie selections, meaning its three-pronged National Draft haul were the only fresh faces taken in after trade period. With Bowey and Laurie, the Demons have added some much-needed class going forward in support of 2019 draftee Kysaiah Pickett, while Rosman could become a fearsome key forward in the long-term, but has great flexibility otherwise.

Featured Image: Melbourne’s fresh faces from the 2020 AFL Draft | Credit: (Retrieved from) @melbournefc via Twitter

EXPLAINER | Pocket Podcast: Jamarra Ugle-Hagan vs. Logan McDonald

OVER the last week, Draft Central launched its brand new series of pocket podcasts, a collection of short-form discussions which narrow in on a range of topics heading into the 2020 AFL Draft. In the next edition, Chief Editor Peter Williams again sat down with AFL Draft Editor Michael Alvaro to compare arguably the two best key forward prospects in this year’s AFL Draft pool.

The players in question may well also be the best two overall prospects out of the class of 2020. They are of course Oakleigh Chargers’ Jamarra Ugle-Hagan and Perth’s Logan McDonald. Despite being robbed of a top-age season, Ugle-Hagan remains the consensus number one prospect this year, while McDonald catapulted himself into top five calculations with an incredible WAFL League campaign in which he led the goalkicking charts early on. Though they predominantly play similar roles, they do so in such different styles which makes a comparison between the two all the more interesting.

To listen to the discussion in full, click here.

The discussion was led by pitting the pair head-to-head across a range of categories, which are listed below. A name in green denotes the player being deemed superior in that category, while orange denotes the opposite. That is not to say that either player is lacking in any of these areas, but is rather a method of conveying which one of these prospects is specifically better than the other in each department.

Jamarra Ugle-Hagan
Oakleigh Chargers/Vic Country

Height: 195cm
Weight: 90kg
DOB: April 4, 2002

Player Profiles

(For full draft profiles on either player, click on their names highlighted in red)

Logan McDonald
Perth/Western Australia

Height: 196cm
Weight: 86kg
DOB: April 4, 2002

Ugle-Hagan

Vertical Leap

McDonald

Ugle-Hagan

Speed

McDonald

Ugle-Hagan

Agility

McDonald

Ugle-Hagan

Endurance

McDonald

Ugle-Hagan

Contested Marking

McDonald

Ugle-Hagan

Field Kicking

McDonald

Ugle-Hagan

Set Shots

McDonald

Ugle-Hagan

Ground-Level Work

McDonald

Ugle-Hagan

Defensive Pressure

McDonald

Ugle-Hagan

Consistency

McDonald

Ugle-Hagan

Upside

McDonald

EXPLAINER | Pocket Podcast: Brayden Cook vs. Conor Stone

OVER the last week, Draft Central launched its brand new series of pocket podcasts, a collection of short-form discussions which narrow in on a range of topics heading into the 2020 AFL Draft. In the next edition, Chief Editor Peter Williams again sat down with AFL Draft Editor Michael Alvaro to compare two of the most exciting and similar medium-forward available in this year’s crop.

The players under our microscope are South Adelaide’s Brayden Cook, and Oakleigh Chargers’ Conor Stone. They measure up virtually identically in terms of size and athletic attributes, with both prospects having also enjoyed steep rises on the back of their on-field performances. Cook has come from the clouds this year to consolidate his standing as a draft bolter, while Stone burst onto the scene with promising showings in the Chargers’ 2019 NAB League premiership team. Their claims to dual-position status as deep forwards who can also play on the wing adds another air of similarity, making them an ideal pair to set alongside one another.

To listen to the comparison in full, click here.

Here are the respective players’ pocket profiles:
(Click on their names highlighted in red to read their full draft profiles)

Brayden Cook
South Adelaide/South Australia

DOB: July 18, 2002
Height: 189cm
Weight: 82kg

Strengths: Versatility, athleticism, goal sense, smarts/evasion, overhead marking, game-winning ability, decision making/creativity

Improvements: Finishing consistency, strength

Conor Stone
St Kevin’s/Oakleigh Chargers/Vic Metro

DOB: April 22, 2002
Height: 188cm
Weight: 81kg

Strengths: Goal sense, finishing, athleticism, vertical leap, smarts/anticipation, endurance

Improvements: Untapped versatility, explosive speed, consistent impact/output

Here’s how they match up athletically:

Cook:

Standing Vertical Jump – 58cm
Running Vertical Jump (R/L) – 72cm/74cm
Speed (20m) – 3.103 seconds
Agility – 8.45 seconds
Endurance (2km) – 6:48

Stone:

Standing Vertical Jump – 67cm
Running Vertical Jump (R/L) – 73cm/83cm
Speed (20m) – 3.10 seconds
Agility – 8.67 seconds
Endurance (yo-yo) – 21.5

Ultimately, there are a few points of difference which separate these two prospects. It should also be pointed out, in the interest of fairness, that Cook’s testing data has been pulled from the recent South Australian Draft Combine, while Stone’s results are from preseason as he awaits the Vic Metro combine on October 31. Furthermore, Cook has been able to push his case massive in 2020 with a full season of football, while Stone has been made to wait it out on the sidelines like all other Victorian prospects this year. Like Cook, he could well have been another to push into top 25 calculations with a big top-age campaign.

Though they measure up at essentially the same height/weight and play the same role, clubs will find little areas which have them leaning towards one player more than the other. At least at NAB League level, Stone has proven more of a forward/wingman, whereas Cook has proven to start on the wing before shifting forward. Both are capable of kicking big bags of goals and can take eye-catching overhead marks, while their smarts at ground level bode for outstanding forward craft. Stone has a strong athletics background and arguably boasts a greater endurance base, but Cook is a touch lighter and more nimble across the ground in open play.

At this point, and by no fault of Stone, Cook is potentially ahead in terms of draft stocks having been able to prove his worth on-field more recently. Time will tell whether that is the case come draft day, which looms on the week of December 7. Both look like second round candidates.

Glimpses enough to show O’Loughlin’s talent

TWO games, two rare accolades. The journey of Alice O’Loughlin is one that is certainly unique in the sense that she has only played two matches in three years at the Oakleigh Chargers, due to other sporting commitments and injury. When she looks back on it, she considers it a remarkable feat to have played one game and then made the Under 16s Vic Metro squad, then only added one more game this year to earn an AFL Women’s Draft Combine invite.

“I’ve been very fortunate to be able to get those opportunities with the very limited game time they’ve seen me play,” O’Loughlin said. “Especially given this season I was hoping to string a few games together and really create a name myself, and get myself out there but I am very fortunate of what I’ve got to do with only two games.”

O’Loughlin has never been far from a sport whether it be a round ball or even oar, which has taken up a lot of her teenage years. After just the one bottom-age game in 2018, last year was meant to be a big year for the middle-ager, but her season was wiped out by an ankle injury. Fast forward to 2020 and after playing the first game, missed the second due to rowing commitments and then the season was postponed.

“I’ve always loved all my sports as long as I can remember so I’ve tried to get my hands on all sports whether it’s basketball, netball, rowing and school sports,” O’Loughlin said. “That means I’ve had to juggle footy with all of them so I haven’t really given footy my biggest footy. “But I’ve loved it, it’s always been my favourite sport and essentially once the pathway I was really excited to see where I could take it.

“Having all those sports, I never really got to play that many games,” she said. “Especially for Oakleigh, because I’ve been in the Oakleigh program for three years or four years. I’ve only ended up playing two games, which I probably would have liked to have changed that but I suppose we can’t now.”

Having played at Kew Comets since she was eight-years-old, O’Loughlin has been lucky enough to play football her whole life, it has just been one of a number of sports that she has juggled with a full platter throughout her journey. She cites the creativity of the game and playing with mates as some of the main attributes that attracted her to Aussie rules in the first place, “everyone working together to win games and thus winning a premiership”.

Having not played for the Chargers in two years, O’Loughlin was pleased to run out in Wangaratta against the Murray Bushrangers back in Round 1 where she booted three goals in a big win.

“I was really excited because I had an ankle injury the previous season so that knocked me out of the whole season,” O’Loughlin said. “Then so I was just really excited to get a few games together but that obviously got cut short because of COVID. “I was really excited to just go out there and just have fun with it. “It was really good game and good to get the win.”

Her experience with Vic Metro was a fond one, and whilst overwhelming considering others had played more games at the level, she thoroughly enjoyed it.

“It was really good opportunity to play alongside the best talent. But yeah it was a great experience for me,” O’Loughlin said. “I must admit I was a bit nervous, and I suppose coming into a new environment I did get a bit nervous and I would have liked to have played a lot better in the Vic game, but it was just a great learning experience.”

While rowing had caused her to miss a number of football commitments – including the Chargers’ trip down to Tasmania for the Devils’ first ever home game – O’Loughlin said it had helped her over the journey.

“It really helped me with my fitness in footy,” she said. “I’ve always tried to balance the two but then after my ankle injury the main reason why I did rowing to gain fitness up again and that strength. “Then transferred that over into footy but then didn’t get the chance to.”

As someone who knew she needed a full season to prove herself, O’Loughlin said she was “devastated” when presented with the news that the season had been called off.

“I banked on having a good season and stringing a few games together,” she said. “I was pretty devastated and didn’t really know what to think at the time but I mean there’s nothing you can really do about it at the time but perform when you get the opportunity too.”

O’Loughlin’s strengths include her skills and reading of the play, which has developed over a decade of playing footy, even if it has not been at NAB League level. Her main goal at the moment is landing on an AFL Women’s list in next week’s draft and hoping to build her game further in an elite environment.

“It would be amazing just to get the opportunity to be put in a professional environment and just to have a preseason because I’ve never really got to have a full footy preseason, or full footy season so really seeing where I can take my skills when I have a full season under my belt,” O’Loughlin said.

Lin fast to transition into football

JOANNA Lin was not convinced about starting competitive Australian rules football at first, despite a friend referring her to it back in Year 10. While the future Oakleigh Chargers’ talent enjoyed playing it during her school breaks at recess and lunch, it took a little while – and some extra prodding from her friend – for her to take the plunge and join her local club, Bulleen-Templestowe. When her friend first asked her to come join, it was more of a “maybe” and put it on the backburner.

“I was like ‘oh yeah’, I’ve played a bit in primary at recess and lunch and I always thought about playing it, but girls could only play up to a certain age, I didn’t really pursue it,” Lin said. “Then she was like ‘you should come to one of our trainings and see how that goes’. “I was like ‘oh maybe’ then as time went by, the plans you make with your friends but don’t end up happening.

“I didn’t really think much of it until recess and lunch, she came up to me and said ‘hey I mentioned to the team manager about you and they asked if you could come’ and I was like ‘oh woah that’s sick’. “Then I showed up for my first training at the club and that was just a really good environment. “I decided to play and went from there.”

It turned out to be a wise decision as Lin quickly caught onto the sport and described Oakleigh as “one big family” and definitely a step up from local football. As an outside running player, Lin has been thrown around in a few positions during her career.

“At local I played mainly half-forward so it was always going up the field and also considered through the midfield rotation as well,” Lin said. “I really enjoyed the running aspect, being able to run off players and just run down the field.”

Last year was Lin’s first season with the Chargers, and as a middle-ager, she was coming in with less experience than many others. Despite her lack of experience, she put together a terrific season culminating in her polling the most votes for her side at the NAB League Best and Fairest night and making Team of the Year.

“That was insane,” Lin said. “I was just playing how I played and so when it came to the night, I was just kind of confused what I was doing there because there were so many girls there that were really much better and everything so I was very confused. “But I was really grateful when I saw the votes and I was like ‘oh wow’ and I was the top one for Oakleigh. “It was really weird but very grateful for it.”

Not only has Lin been able to transition from one school footy into elite junior footy, but it is transitioning from one part of the ground to the other that really stands out.

“I think my strengths are probably the transition through the backline to the forward line because I’m kind of like on the wing,” Lin said. “The kick out, best position to kick to, that’s probably my best strength, in transition.”

Right now Lin is aiming to build her strength to impact more in aerial contests, because she said to become a better player she has to “compete better in the one-on-ones”. While her season was cut short this year, Lin has had plenty of favourite football memories, including the three-peat she won at her local club.

“It was really good to win three premierships in a row with those girls there and just the same (like Oakleigh) it’s like a family there, it’s probably my favourite memory,” Lin said.

After a huge first season, Lin earned a spot in the AFL Women’s National Academy, something she has cherished and was certainly not expecting when she was told last year.

“It was crazy because I got the email after my exam last year for maths,” Lin said. “I was kind of down because I didn’t go as well as I thought I’d go (in the exam). “Then I got the email for it and I was like ‘woah what is this?’ and I was with some of my mates and they were celebrating and I was in shock.

Being invited to that, it’s been very helpful,” she said. “It’s been a great experience, been able to meet the other girls who are pushing to get drafted this year and become really close to them. “That has been a really good part of my career so far.”

Lin draws inspiration from those very teammates who help her become a better player and in return she tries to do the same as she strives to get to the highest level she can, whether it be the AFL Women’s or VFL Women’s, just making the most out of her footballing journey.

“I don’t know if this sounds a bit cliche but probably the people around me like my teammates (are my inspiration),” she said. “Watching them work on their skills and become a better player themselves, it pushes me inside to become a better player and I can help the team more as well.”

As for what being drafted next week would mean, Lin knows it would be something special for her in what has been such a promising journey thus far.

“It would mean a lot,” Lin said. “It would be like a lot of the effort and hard work that I’ve put into my footy throughout all these years has helped.”