Tag: north adelaide

Scouting Notes: 2020 SANFL Grand Finals

GRAND Final week in the South Australian National Football League (SANFL) brings along with it another edition of our scouting notes, focusing on the top draft-relevant performers from around the competition this weekend. In this instalment, we widen our scope to cover the prospects running around across all three grades, with a particular focus on State Academy based talentNational Combine invitees, and others who may push for selection along the line.

Please consider that each set of notes showcase the opinions of our scouts individually, and there are only so many players we can keep an eye on each week.

>> Power Rankings: October Edition

LEAGUE/RESERVES

WWT Eagles vs. North Adelaide

By: Tom Wyman

WWT Eagles:

#9 Rhyan Mansell (League)

The young defender again played an integral role down back for the premiers. The Tasmanian combined well with Lachlan Jones and veteran Patrick Giuffreda in the back half, finishing with three rebounds. Mansell used the ball with precision and orchestrated a number of successful attacks. He showcased his sound vision, composure, and decision making and positioned himself well to take a number of intercept marks. Mansell finished the game with 19 disposals, eight marks and five tackles.

#16 James Rowe (League)

As has been the case all season, the excitement machine looked threatening whenever he was near the footy. He demanded attention all day and capitalised on his opportunities, as all good small forwards do. North’s Mitch Clisby was given the big job on Rowe and kept him quiet early on as the Roosters started strongly. However, when the Eagles were well on top, he nailed a goal in the dying minutes of the first half. The son of former-Crow Stephen, Rowe kicked a fantastic goal from 40 metres out after his Eagles teammates forced a turnover in the third term. Whenever he wasn’t lurking around the forward line, Rowe was getting under the skin of his Roosters opponents. He used the ball to terrific effect in general play and finished the day with 15 disposals and four inside 50s to go with his two goals. After a dominant season, Rowe is becoming increasingly difficult to overlook for a spot at the elite level.

#28 Jacob Wehr (League)

The 22-year-old from Balaklava in South Australia’s mid-north was excellent for the Eagles. Wehr was able to get the ball in some time and space, allowing him to cut up North’s defence with his pin-point foot skills. The wingman worked hard both ways between the arcs and continuously provided an outlet for Woodville-West Torrens. He finished the contest with 19 disposals, six marks, five tackles, two inside 50s and three rebound 50s. Wehr has been a revelation for the Eagles this season and is one of several mature-aged prospects who could attract some AFL attention over the coming months.

#34 Lachlan Jones (League)

The bull-like defender produced another sensational performance on the big stage and once again showed class beyond his years. As he has shown time and time again throughout the year, Jones refused to be beaten one-on-one. He was deployed as the loose defender for much of the day and read the play exceptionally well. He positioned himself like a seasoned veteran, taking a number of important intercept marks. He showed great composure and poise both with and without the ball, using it efficiently by hand and foot. He produced a number of terrific defensive actions which didn’t show up on the stats sheet, but will have impressed coach Jade Sheedy. Jones finished with 18 disposals, five marks, four tackles and three rebound 50s. A premiership medal is a fitting way to end a wonderful season for Jones, who appears likely to be a first round selection come draft night.

#51 Lachlan McNeil (League)

In a game where all the Eagles youngsters contributed well, McNeil was the best of the bunch. He provided relentless run along the wing and used the ball as well as anyone. McNeil’s high work rate allowed him to take a host of marks on the outer side. He used the ball well and his teammates clearly looked for him to hit a target going inside 50. But the clear highlight of his game was a terrific running goal in the second quarter, which featured two bounces and a beautiful finish. He concluded the match with 23 disposals, nine marks, two tackles, three clearances and six inside 50s. The Clare product missed out on being drafted as an 18-year-old last year, but after a great performance on Grand Final day and a consistent season at senior level with the Eagles, McNeil could find himself a home at AFL level at the second time of asking.

>> MORE WWT EAGLES CONTENT

North Adelaide:

#37 Karl Finlay (League)

It was a difficult day for the Roosters, who struggled to get anything going after quarter time as Finlay and his fellow backmen had their backs against the wall all day. However Finlay was one of North’s best, particularly in the air. He spent some time on dangerous Eagle forward Jack Hayes and also rolled onto Jake Von Bertouch at times. Given the duo’s ability to clunk big contested marks, Finlay held his own. He was thrown up forward by coach Jacob Surjan for a brief stint when the Eagles were in full control and took one of his three contested marks. Finlay tackled hard at ground level and also provided some rebound. He finished with 13 disposals, three marks, five tackles and two inside 50s.

#38 Dyson Hilder (Reserves)

Much like Finlay in the League game, fellow teenaged defender Hilder was similarly strong in the air for the Roosters’ Reserves. He took a couple of strong contested marks and finished the game with seven grabs overall. Hilder, who played a couple of senior games with North Adelaide earlier in the season, provided some clear rebound by foot and was among his side’s best players, despite the loss. He also gave number one ruckman James Craig a break by rotating through the ruck and winning seven hitouts. He finished with 16 disposals and four rebound 50s.

>> MORE NORTH ADELAIDE CONTENT

UNDER 18s

Norwood vs. Sturt

By: Michael Alvaro

Norwood:

#1 Cooper Murley

With Norwood at full strength and solid top-age operators roaming through the engine room, Murley has been squeezed out a touch in this finals series after an outstanding regular season. Nonetheless, the speedy bottom-ager managed to have an impact with bursts of pace and some crafty plays forward of centre. His instinctive attacking runs allowed him to find space inside 50 from the get-go, sinking one of two first term set shots. His kicks were a touch rushed on the outside under the heat of battle, but most of his running game came in that kind of fashion. He missed a few more chances to hit the scoreboard, albeit from tough positions and distances, with a two-bounce dash through the corridor during the final term ending in a flying shot which just did not have the legs. It was more a game of glimpses for Murley compared to his previous form, but he looms as a first round prospect for next year’s draft.

#4 Henry Nelligan

Nelligan is the kind of player you want on your side during a big game, with his consistency and work rate up there with the best of players. Starting in midfield and rotating forward, the diminutive ball winner ended with a game-high 28 disposals to go with six inside 50s and 1.3 in an inspired display. Not only did Nelligan showcase his clean hands and quick skills at ground level, but he was also able to accumulate around the ground and provide a reliable outlet in all areas. A lot of his clearances were booted over his shoulder, but still gained good meterage in the high-stakes contest. While stationed forward, Nelligan stayed busy and used his smarts to position beautifully upon Norwood’s inside 50 entries. His lone goal came in the first term from a strong mark close to goal, and he put two other chances just wide with another touched before bouncing through the big sticks. After some massive performances for the Redlegs, he remains an outside chance to be drafted as a natural footballer with great smarts.

#5 Ethan Schwerdt

Donning the knee brace once again, Schwerdt was a very handy part of Norwood’s midfield-forward rotation. His first big contribution came inside attacking 50, as he put a quick snap wide, but followed up with a shrewd crumb and dribble goal in the opening term. Schwerdt’s skills were neat in the short range and his little bursts of speed away from congestion proved key in setting Norwood on the front foot. His second goal, which came in the final term, was undoubtedly his highlight of the day. Schwerdt bravely marked between two opponents, moved on immediately to burn both of them, and slotted home a long-range bomb on the run.

#11 Xavier Tranfa

Another of Norwood’s prolific midfielders who also impacted in the front half, Tranfa’s two third term goals truly broke the game open. His first came via a strong mark directly from the centre clearance against a couple of opponents, with the set shot converted emphatically from around the 50-metre arc. Shortly after, he found himself on the end of another forward chain, wheeling on his favoured left side and sinking a powerful shot through the big sticks. That kind of impact was complimented by some strong work at the contest, as Tranfa attacked both the ball and carrier with intent. He was clean at ground level and while not overly quick, he would get his legs pumping or buy enough time to eventually send Norwood into attack. 19 disposals, six tackles, four clearances, and a couple of goals made for a terrific all-round game.

#15 Harlee Chandler

Chandler has proven somewhat of a finals wildcard for Norwood, slotting into the midfield with aplomb and providing great balance at the contest. He began proceedings with a sharp run through the middle and goal assisting pass inside 50, with that kind of run and movement through the corridor a sign of things to come. He was able to fend off opponents and break free, with much of his work as clean as and impactful as anyone else afield. A rush of blood saw Chandler miss his final term attempt on goal after a terrific play to win the ball, but it hardly took away from what was an eye-catching performance from the youngster. He finished with 19 disposals, six tackles, and three clearances.

#27 Nathan Hearing

The 2020 Alan Stewart Medal winner was best afield, Hearing was his usual heroic self through the ruck. Hardly a one-dimensional bigman, the 195cm prospect won a game-high 11 clearances, one more than his 10 hitouts throughout the day. His 21 disposals all-up came in various positions and fashions, but the majority of his work was done at the fall of the ball at stoppages to release his runners at ground level. Hearing’s imposing figure was also sighted down back where he took a couple of relieving marks close to goal, using his reach and timing to stand tall amid forming packs. He may have been beaten vertically at times at the centre bounces, but fared well around the ground and even took balls directly out of the ruck to send the Redlegs forward.

Others:

As is often the case for Norwood, an even team spread saw many contributors stand up across the day. Mitchell Trepka stood up early from defence, with Billy Haebich providing some dash and Sam Duke proving an important aerial figure on the same line. Daniel Fairbrother, who gained senior experience this year was also part of Norwood’s sturdy defence. Marcus Roberts fared well up forward with a couple of goals while big Finn Heard spearheaded the attack, and Michael Cavallaro provided a classy outlet on the wing.

>> MORE NORWOOD CONTENT

Sturt:

#9 Malachy Carruthers

Usually one of the more attacking defenders who is capable of impacting through the corridor, Carruthers’ rebounding efforts mostly came from inside own defensive 50. While his long-range kicking was as sound as ever amid the breeze and Norwood’s pressure, Carruthers seldom had reliable targets to kick to as the ball would often eventually find its way back to his area. He was one of Sturt’s only consistently cool heads down back, but was too often forced too far away from positions in which he would normally attack. Carruthers seemed to lift in the third term as the Double Blues’ hopes began to fade, with his intercept marking, urgent running, and weighted kicks all coming to the fore. It would end up being an effort in vein, but the potential draft bolter finished with a very handy 21 disposals, nine marks, and nine rebound 50s as one of Sturt’s best.

#17 Mani Liddy

Arguably Sturt’s most impactful midfielder in the first half, Liddy was particularly prolific at the centre bounces. His core strength and clean hands gave the Double Blues numerous opportunities to attack first, though some grubber kicks out of congestion on Liddy’s end did his side few favours in that sense. His disposal on the move was a touch untidy in those opening stages despite finding the ball at will, apart from his obvious proficiency via hand. Not shy of a bit of niggle, Liddy’s lone goal for the game came in the second term after being crunched inside 50, with his set shot conversion proving sound. He attempted to force some forward momentum in the latter stages, finishing with 18 disposals, seven clearances, and a goal.

#18 Tom Powell

Powell may have seen the most ball for Sturt with 25 disposals and six marks, but had a touch less than his usual impact around the stoppages. His ability to extract and quickly release via hand was still on show, with numerous drawing handballs and well-timed distributive touches showcasing his best assets. It also lent to his high-level vision and decision making, especially amid the contested Grand Final chaos. Powell’s clean hands were also shown as he gathered well below his knees and snapped home a sharp goal in the second term, something he is increasingly bringing to the fore. With a couple of goal assists to cap off his outing, that attacking prowess is something which will be important in shaking that one-dimensional accumulator tag. He lived up to his billing for the most part, but could not quite help Sturt get over the line.

#25 James Borlase

Borlase was in the thick of the action as tensions boiled over in the third term, not afraid to throw his large frame around and get involved in the biff. He was hardly the only one, but got very heated and seemed to be a prime target for Norwood as ill discipline crept into Sturt’s game. Outside of that, Borlase once again proved a class above many of his Under 18 competitors with terrific reading of the play down back and strong intercept marking. His ball use was often sound and allowed Sturt to retain possession, without being overly damaging. He had a purple patch in the second term with a string of aerial marks, while also bringing his kick penetration into play. He was thrown into the centre bounces during the final quarter in hopes of turning the midfield battle with his physicality, but would have little impact there and revert back to his defensive duties in open play. The Crows Academy prospect finished with 22 disposals and eight marks (three contested) as arguably Sturt’s best player afield.

#32 Morgan Ferres

Ferres finished his bottom-age season strongly, providing a much-needed target leading up from the forward half. It proved a tough gig as Sturt struggled to transition the ball, with Ferres forced to search all the way up to defensive wing at times to find the ball. Half of his six marks were contested, and he was also able to make an impact closer to goal with some touches inside 50. Ferres ended the game with 1.1, sinking a set shot in the final term after seeing multiple attempts either go wide, fall short, or end up out of bounds. If he can tidy up that conversion, Ferres may well prove to be a force in next year’s competition.

Others:

Will Spain‘s efforts to win the ball and tackle at ground level were noted by his coaches, while fellow bottom-ager Brad Jefferies also gave it his all while rotating forward through midfield. Blake Higgins provided his usual run on the outside, while skipper Ned Walter was valiant in defence. Declan Hortle‘s 33 hitouts in the ruck also proved a big effort against the player judged best afield.

>> MORE STURT CONTENT

Featured Image: Norwood’s Under 18s celebrate their 2020 SANFL premiership | Credit: Hannah Howard/SANFL

Clark dares greatly and follows coach’s mantra to Roosters’ flag

NORTH Adelaide’s Julia Clark by her own admission is quieter than most and despite being told of her abilities and how she can influence a game, Clark was just happy to play her role in 2019. She was happy to do her bit each week as the Roosters reached the grand final, only to fall to reigning premiers South Adelaide. Fast forward 12 months (and a little more thanks to the COVID-19 pandemic) and Clark is instead on the winning end of a South Australian National Football League (SANFL) Women’s decider.

“Yeah it was amazing,” Clark said of the premiership. “I learnt a lot in this season. “Last year was good, but this season I’ve learnt so much and I guess the feelings at trainings was always intense, but it was always good fun. “You always got something out of it, and being around such talented people and having to work harder than I had to work last year just to get into the team every week just really pushed me beyond where I thought I could go.”

Clark said the 2019 grand final loss was a motivating factor for the team in 2020, but said she personally felt she did all she could in that loss. However it was not until master coach Krissie Steen arrived at Prospect Oval that Clark noticed a massive difference in her game.

“Yeah I think definitely for the team it was a big motivator, especially as most of them had lost the finals the year before that and the year before that as well,” Clark said. “I think I was very tentative last season and I just sort of played my role and what I was told to do. “I didn’t really do anything extra, so when it came to the Grand Final knowing it would be my last game of the season, I think I just threw it all out there and personally I think that was my best game.

“So I came out of that loss not feeling bad personally, but knowing that I wanted to work extra hard this year and I think with Krissie’s mentality and really emphasing ‘Dare Greatly’ that really changed my thinking around how my season went last year and how I didn’t do that and what I wanted to put into my season this year.”

Indeed, it was Steen that gave the teenager confidence to take the game on and back herself in her role playing in defence.

“Yeah I think as I said before I’ve learnt so much and I think it’s all because of her (Steen). “It’s great having a female in that role and just like she knows what she’s talking about and you always know that she’s right and she also knows what’s right for you personally and as a team. “If something goes wrong, she can blame herself and I think just vulnerability and you don’t shy away from mistakes, you just focus on the next time you have to do something and just being better.”

Rewinding back a few years, Clark came through the pathway and was always involved with the Roosters in some capacity, and then got the call-up to make her debut in 2019 and has hardly missed a beat since.

I think my first real taste of footy was at North Adelaide in the Under 14s comp,” Clark said. “The four-game comp. “And that was in 2015 and then in 2016 I went out to Hope Valley because they were the closest club with a girls team and I played Under 16s for one season there and then we managed to get a team in Broadview which is my local suburb. “From there, I kept playing the North juniors in the coming years and I kept getting nominated for the North juniors once that started happening and then went from there.”

Like many young girls, Clark came from a netball background, but once she switched into footy, she loved it and the challenges associated with it, particularly playing in defence.

I think coming from netball, I think it was just a lot more freedom playing footy and it was something new that I just got to run wherever I wanted and just a whole lot of freedom,” Clark said. “There’s so many things to keep improving on and I just like the challenge of it.

“I definitely find defence at the higher levels a bit easier to cope with than forward. “In the local league (playing) forward’s alright, but back is definitely more natural in my head in the higher levels anyway.”

Clark rates her composure with ball-in-hand and decision making as amongst her best traits. Whilst not a massive accumulator, she does not make too many mistakes and is one player that can be relied upon to hit targets out there. She positions herself well in defence, and said she is just hoping to build even greater confidence to take the game on more, and back herself with tackling and growing her overall fitness base.

While Clark’s side did finish the 2020 season undefeated, the defender admitted it was not until the final few seconds of the grand final that she knew her team had it in the bag.

“Maybe a few seconds before the siren went,” Clark said. “But definitely when there was still time left in that last quarter, it was very tense and it was mainly after the siren where you could sort of relax and just celebrate.”

Clark has been in the South Australian State Academy the last two seasons, and it has also been a huge factor in building her confidence.

“It’s been really good,” Clark said. “I think I’m very harsh on myself and I think sometimes I need to remind myself I am a good player and I think the State Academy really helps you realise how good you and how good all the other people around you are. “It’s just amazing to have friends and get up to this level.”

As the SANFL Women’s season usually finishes in May, Clark headed back to her local club last year to maintain fitness and work on areas of her game to be fit and firing for the 2020 season.

“Coming off last season after North Adelaide I went back to Broadview and just wanted to build up my confidence again and coming back to North this year I wanted to take my fitness which is how I maintained place in the team last season,” Clark said. “I just brought that in this season and just really tried to keep my confidence up and with Krissie’s mentality of ‘Daring Greatly’ I just had to push myself every training and every trial game just to make sure I was confident and made sure I was outside of my comfort zone than I was last year. 

“Think in future, definitely keeping my confidence up and building my confidence to keep daring and using my voice more and trusting myself more is what I’m aiming to do in the future.”

Rather than another individual, it is Clark’s internal determination that has spurred her on to follow the pathway and chase her dream of playing at the elite level.

“I think my drive has always been that, I’m pretty good at a lot of things and so when I find something challenging, my mentality that I have to master it,” she said. “I have to do everything I can to do everything to be the best I can at it. “So I think that internal drive is what keeps pushing me to keep going and get better and better.”

Passion and resilience key for Zbierski

NORTH Adelaide player Andie Zbierski has not always had it easy when it comes to football. Delayed beginnings, recurring injuries and four hour car trips are all parts of her journey, but she says her love for the game has made it all worthwhile.

“I love the adrenaline rush I get from playing and how everyone gets around each other,” Zbierski said. “When one person drops their head, they’ve got the whole team, support staff and coaches to pick them up. We’re all together as a team and even after the game we all come together, it’s such an inclusive environment.”

Due to the limited opportunities to play women’s football when she was younger, Zbierski only started competing four years ago.

“I played my first year close to home at Roopena Football Club in Whyalla,” she said. “I was too old to continue playing there the next year, so I moved to Salisbury Football Club in Adelaide.”

She played a key role in Salisbury’s 2018 Division One Adelaide Women’s Football League premiership. Given the lengths the Whyalla local went through to play in that side, no one could question her passion for playing the game.

“I was driving down to Adelaide with my parents four hours there and four hours back every weekend,” she said. “The drive got a bit boring and repetitive, but it’s not a bad drive.”

Zbierski says she has fantastic parents that are fully supportive of her football career.

“Dad has always taken me out to trainings and also down to one of the ovals near our house to just work on little things and get my skills up,” she said. “Mum would always drive me down to Adelaide for my Salisbury and North Adelaide games. They’re both really passionate about my football and they always encourage me to do the right thing.”

As the only other family member with football experience, Zbierski says her dad is her biggest inspiration. He has supported all of her sporting ventures and offered her important personal guidance during matches.

“Even in the earlier days when I played basketball and netball as well, my dad would always come out, support and give me little pointers,” she said. “I just take that a bit more to heart when dad’s saying it because he knows me, he knows how I play and he knows exactly what he needs to say to me to get me to understand.”

Zbierski started playing for North Adelaide’s SANFLW side at the beginning of 2019, and she has learnt a lot about the senior style of football.

“They play very differently to country football, which is what I first got taught,” she said. “The main differences are the structures and extra level of competitiveness. Even Division One compared to SANFLW is a big difference, but once you get the hang of it, it’s really good.”

Due to recurring injury issues, Zbierski’s love for the game took a hit last year and she decided to take some time away from football after the 2019 SANFLW season.

“I had a couple of back injuries, a few repetitive groin strains and some ankle injuries that took a toll on me,” she said. “I was beating myself up because I wasn’t 100 per cent and I wasn’t playing games. Not training for a few months and moving to a different club for fun definitely helped.”

That new club was Division One’s Old Ignatians. Zbierski moved there at the beginning of this year in the hope that she could play a full season away from senior level.

“I moved to Adelaide at the end of 2019 to pursue my football career, and there’s a few girls that live at a college with me who play for Old Ignatians,” she said. “I asked mum if I could move to that club because I didn’t really play last year, it’s not a proper season because of COVID and I want to go out and just play for fun to get my love back for the game.”

While she didn’t play any SANFLW games for North Adelaide this season, Zbierski continued to spend time at the club working with their strength and conditioning coaches to get her body right.

“I did a lot of agility and changing direction training to help my ankles, and I did extra strength work through different circuits that didn’t put anything too heavy on my back,” she said. “I also did some running with a focus on changing pace and slowing down.”

Thanks to this extra effort put into looking after her body, Zbierski was able to play a full season of amateurs for the Old Ignatians in 2020. She played predominantly as a ruckman, a role that she has excelled in since her first year playing football.

“Back home at Roopena I was pretty much the tallest one out there, so since then ruck has always been my preferred position,” she said. “I would say rucking is my biggest strength, along with my tackling.”

Since she usually has a height advantage, Zbierski is strong defensively despite her lack of experience regarding how to play that role.

“Down in Adelaide I am probably average height and I was chucked in the deep end playing centre-half back during a few games this year,” she said. “I haven’t previously been taught much defensive craft, so I definitely need to work on that during pre-season.”

Zbierski has a career plan that entails one more SANFLW season before moving up to the big league.

“I hope to play a full season at SANFL level next year,” she said. “After that, I want to put my name down to be drafted for AFLW.”

 

For more AFLW and SANFLW news, follow Tom Cheesman on Twitter.

SANFL Women’s season review: North Adelaide

NORTH Adelaide is the next team up in our South Australian National Football League (SANFL) Women’s season review series as we look at the eight sides in reverse ladder order and how their 2020 seasons went down.

Position: 1st
Wins: 12
Losses: 0
Draws: 0

2020 IN A NUTSHELL

Perfect. There is no other way to realistically put it. North Adelaide had an unblemished season with a 12-0 record and earning the minor premiership, and then the real thing with back-to-back wins over incumbents South Adelaide in the qualifying final and grand final. The victory was a role reversal from the year before, and whilst Krissie Steen‘s chargers had their challenges throughout the year, the Roosters met every challenge and deserved the premiership.

AFL WOMEN’S ALL-STARS GAME REPRESENTATIVES:

Amber Ward

An over-age defender with great hands and a booming kick, Ward showed she is well in contention to be drafted this year after receiving an AFL Women’s Draft Combine invitation. Often stationed at centre half-back, Ward was a reliable figure back there, combining well with teammate Kristi Harvey as the anchors in the defensive 50.

Cristie Castle

A sneaky forward who could push up the ground, Castle could hit the scoreboard or set up scoring opportunities for her teammates. She generally used it pretty well in the forward half of the ground and always looked damaging when the ball was in her vicinity. Providing good defensive pressure as well, Castle was a strong team player.

Erin Sundstrom

Joined the Roosters this season coming back from Queensland and provided good dash coming out of defence. She possesses a long kick and was able to get them out of trouble on a number of occasions, and provided an extra intercepting target in the air back there.

Julia Clark

A versatile small who could play at either end, Clark has established herself in the Roosters best side over the past two years playing nearly every game. She played a role in defence for the grand final and is a top-ager who has developed well in the system.

Ashleigh Woodland

Won the league’s goalkicking and showed she is a class above at state level. Is one who spent a season on Melbourne’s AFL Women’s list and was one of four players to earn an AFL Women’s Draft Combine invite. She is strong above her head, an accurate kick for goal, and able to hit targets around the ground and play through the midfield, or even in defence.

Kristi Harvey

A rock on the last line, Harvey nullified opposition forwards whilst providing aerial strength to intercept and pump the ball out of the back 50. Did not mind getting into the ear of opposition forwards, and left nothing out on the ground with her attack on the ball, re-establishing herself as one of the most reliable defenders in the competition this season.

Katelyn Pope

Possessing some serious wheels, Pope’s ability to take the game on and break the lines really made a point of difference for the Roosters this season. Often playing off a wing or drifting at half-forward, Pope could beat anyone in a foot race and if she got goalside, it was almost game over for any opponent. She could hit the scoreboard or set others up in a really impressive year.

Jorja Eldridge

Played a couple of games this year for the Roosters coming from the country area in Whyalla with a basketball background. She has versatility to play at either end and showed good development being able to crack into the Roosters side given the strength of the unit.

Rayne Rivalland

A developing talent with a year left until she turns 18, Rivalland will no doubt feature more often next season as a rebounding defender who can be switched forward if required. She has some good athleticism and takes the game on, reading the ball well in flight based on her All-Stars game.

Lauren Gauci

Rounded out the back six nicely and added a point of difference as that smaller runner who was a reliable executor by hand or foot. She looked to shoot a dagger down the wing or open up the game, and did take the game on from time to time as well. Provided good offence while being accountable at half-back.

Kate Case

Another middle-age talent who earned a spot in the All-Stars squad playing forward, and has a bit of zip about her. She might not be tall, but has talent and continues to develop strongly. As someone who can come in and play a small forward’s role or further up the ground, Case will be one to watch in 2021 after an impressive grand final.

Andie Zbierski

Another country-based player who plays predominantly as a defender. She is highly competitive and reliable as they come. She might not have a huge amount of SANFL Women’s experience, but she showed in the games she did play that she has a high scope to develop.

OTHERS WHO STOOD OUT:

  • Anne Hatchard
  • Britt Perry
  • Talia Radan
  • Lauren Daniel
  • Hannah Ewings
  • Leah Tynan
  • Bek Rasheed

Like South Adelaide, this list could go on forever with that many contributors across the board. There is a reason the Roosters won the premiership, and whilst Anne Hatchard dominated the midfield in every game and was the clear standout winning the equal league best and fairest with best on grounds in every match, she was far from alone. Teenage talent Hannah Ewings has another two years until she is draft-eligible despite being one of the best in the competition already, whilst the experience of Lauren Daniel, and the introduction of ruck Bek Rasheed through the middle was great. Throw in AFL Women’s players Britt Perry up forward and Talia Radan down back, and the side had virtually no holes in it.

Summary

North Adelaide capped off a perfect season with a premiership, winning every game and successfully bouncing back from the 2019 defeat in the decider. They had help from some AFL Women’s talent, but it was the next core of players, and the youth coming through that held up the side and ensured that their bottom six was stronger than any other side in the competition.

Picture: SANFL / Deb Curtis

Draft Central All-Star Team matchup: West Adelaide vs. North Adelaide

OUR next All-Star Team battle is one between two South Australian clubs in West Adelaide and North Adelaide. The two captains voted in by the public as the All-Star Players of the AFL Draft era were Mark Ricciuto (West Adelaide) and Wayne Carey (North Adelaide).

TEAMS:

These clubs are seeded 11th (West Adelaide) and 22nd (North Adelaide) respectively, forming another Round of 32 clash in our second half of the draw. The winner will qualify for the Round of 16 stage, set to face the winner of our Central District vs. Dandenong Stingrays tie.

STRENGTHS:

The West Adelaide starting 18 is very strong, particularly in midfield and defence. Ben Rutten and Sam Fisher form a stingy key position pairing down back, supported by the likes of Rory Laird and Beau Waters among the six. It gets even better in the engine room, led by skipper Ricciuto, who is joined by fellow Brownlow medalist Adam Cooney on the ball. Adelaide 300-gamer Tyson Edwards is also among the action, while Shaun Rehn was a straightforward choice for the ruck duties.

North Adelaide’s defence is just as good, if not better with Phil Davis and Sean Wellman heading the likes of Ben Hart and Jared Rivers in support on the last line. The marking power up forward is also formidable, as one of the all-time greats in Wayne Carey commands the six alongside Holland brothers, Nick and Ben. Another set of siblings, Darren and Andrew Jarman also provide some class through midfield and the forwardline.

WEAKNESSES:

Scott Welsh features as an 188cm centre-half forward for the Bloods, though that problem can be easily rectified by the height of Rhys Stanley up forward, and pure excellence of Tony Modra. While the starting 18 is very solid, West Adelaide’s bench depth is decent, but doesn’t feature as many world beaters.

The Roosters’ midfield isn’t quite as fearsome as West Adelaide’s despite featuring Jarman, Shane Edwards, and Josh Francou, while the standard on the bench again drops off a touch, but not significantly.

SUMMARY:

This one is much tighter than the seeding suggests, but we think Westies’ midfield strength will go a long way to taking out this battle against their South Australian counterparts.

Which All-Star Team would you pick?
West Adelaide
North Adelaide

All-Star Team of the AFL Draft Era: Which club is the best of the best?

EVERY year, a new crop of AFL Draft talents rise up and make waves at AFL level. Some clubs such as Calder Cannons and Geelong Falcons are referred to as ‘footy factories’. Others are less well known, but nonetheless vital in providing players with their start to the AFL.

Over the past couple of months, Draft Central has gone through all of the NAB League, SANFL and WAFL clubs and tried to determine the best 24-player squad for their respective clubs. The captains and vice-captains were determined by the public through Instagram voting. Now, it is up to the public to decide which All-Star Team is the greatest of the lot. That’s right, the 30 teams from Victoria, Western Australia and South Australia are going head to head in a knockout draw.

Which teams are competing?

NAB League [12]: Bendigo Pioneers, Calder Cannons, Dandenong Stingrays, Eastern Ranges, Geelong Falcons, Gippsland Power, GWV Rebels, Murray Bushrangers, Northern Knights, Oakleigh Chargers, Sandringham Dragons, Western Jets
SANFL [9]: Central District, Glenelg, North Adelaide, Norwood, Port Adelaide, South Adelaide, Sturt, West Adelaide, Woodville-West Torrens
WAFL [9]: Claremont, East Fremantle, East Perth, South Fremantle, Peel Thunder, Perth, Subiaco, Swan Districts, West Perth

How will it work?

Each day at 10am, we will publish the two All-Star Teams of the AFL Draft era, and the public will be able to vote through the article, Facebook and Twitter, with the overall winner moving through to the next round.

Given there are 30 teams, two sides who we have picked out as the top two seeds – East Fremantle and Geelong Falcons – will have the bye in the opening round, with the other 28 teams seeded appropriately similar to the All-Star Player voting (3rd against 28th, 4th against 27th etc.).

Who is up first?

The first All-Star Team battle is between a couple of metropolitan sides who we have seeded 16th and 17th in the draw. They both have some absolute elite stars, but Calder Cannons and Western Jets will begin the voting on Monday. They will be followed by the Greater Western Victoria (GWV) Rebels and Eastern Ranges on Tuesday, before a cross-state clash sees third seed Port Adelaide Magpies tackle Peel Thunder.

Roosters crow to win memorable first SANFL Women’s flag

NORTH Adelaide has completed an unblemished season to win the 2020 South Australian National Football League (SANFL) Women’s premiership in an epic contest against back-to-back premiers, South Adelaide. In what was truly a fitting grand final, the Roosters held off a late Panthers charge and made the most of their chances in front of goal to salute, 5.5 (35) to 4.4 (28) at Thebarton Oval today.

Adelaide AFL Women’s best and fairest winner and All-Australian, Anne Hatchard was named best on ground in the win, producing another sensational performance to cap off her year, picking up 34 disposals, seven marks, nine clearances, four inside 50s and four rebounds to be the clear star around the ground. While South was brave for the vast majority of the game, and even had its own chances to win the match, the Roosters were better for longer, with 10 more clearances and 16 more inside 50s to dominate possession in the forward half.

North captain Leah Tynan won the toss and opted to kick with the breeze in the opening term, with a two-to-three goal breeze estimated for the ladder leaders to begin the game. Despite Bek Rasheed getting the first clearance and inside 50 for the Roosters, it would be South on the board first, as a density rule free kick – the first of a number against the Roosters – saw the Panthers get it inside 50. A downfield free kick resulted in a set shot to Teah Charlton who made no mistake two minutes in, reading the breeze perfectly and hanging it far left for it to violently swing back around the post and through.

Fellow young gun in Hannah Ewings soon made her mark on the day, with the 2020 Breakthrough Player of the Year having a chance, being smothered, then marking out on a lead from a nice Katelyn Pope kick inside 50. Ewings made it look easy from 40m out with her goal sailing home midway through the term to level the scores. North’s ferocity up the forward end was putting pressure on the South defence as the Panthers struggled to clear it beyond half-back. Pope had a chance herself from 50m but it drifted to the left and through for a behind. The forward half dominance eventually won out though with some nice scrapping forward seeing Hatchard get it deep and Britt Perry created something out of nothing close to the line, reading it well and booting it home from a metre out.

No sooner had the Roosters gained some separation from their opponents, did South get it inside 50 off the next clearance. Cheyenne Hammond had a quick kick towards goal that was mopped up, but the rushed exit kick landed in the arms of a waiting Gypsy Schirmer. The teenager took it upon her self to go back and slot the goal from 35m, reading the breeze well herself to keep her team in touch at the break. A late behind to Cristie Castle off what was a golden opportunity put the favourites in front at quarter time, 2.2 to 2.0.

Despite dominating the opening term with a whopping 10-2 clearances and 15-2 inside 50s, North only held a two-point advantage and the Panthers had made the most of their two inside 50s with goals. North began to get a bit more of the momentum, after quarter time as they worked into the game. Another density penalty almost cost the Roosters again, but this time it was the composure of Amber Ward in defence who hit up Hatchard through a number of opponents to clear to half-back. The Roosters pushed forward themselves early in the term, but the work of Lucy Northcott and Nicole Campbell allowed South to have the run in transition.

A few rushed plays from the South defenders when it did get into North’s attacking end resulted in Mollie McKendrick having a number of inside 50s, with the third one finding Perry on the lead 30m out. She worked into the space well and then made no mistake from the set shot, extending the lead out to eight points, eight minutes into the term against the breeze. South continued to press in a bid to force their way back into the contest, with Elyse Haylock having a chance 30m out after an uncontested mark off great work from Nikki Gore, but it fell short and the Roosters cleared again.

Time and time again South had chances, but a run down tackle on Charlton inside forward 50 saved another chance, though eventually some great vision from Czenya Cavouras on the boundary line spotted a leading Indy Tahau who marked and then went back and slotted the goal. It was back to two points and with only a couple of minutes left, looked like heading into half-time that way. Then there was chaos when in the last 30 seconds, Charlotte Taylor won a free kick at half-forward and drilled in a ball to Castle leading out 35m from home. The ball appeared to hit the ground – the South players were appealing – but Castle also had a fair chunk of it before that, and the mark stood. As the siren sounded, the number one put it through the big sticks in what would be a telling contribution. With just two touches to half-time, Castle had added 1.1 and was making the most of it.

Either side of half-time, Castle had an influential period as she kicked the crucial first goal of the third quarter in the seventh minute and handed her side a 12-point advantage. Hatchard was beginning to build into the game – having already amassed her high volume of touches – and was having a real influence with those touches. Hammond had an early chance for the Panthers from 40m, but it was just touched on the line, and then up the other end a few minutes later, it was Hatchard who placed it beautifully for Castle in the goalsquare to mark and extend the lead.

South kept working hard against the breeze, with a terrific smother by retiring captain, Lauren Buchanan saving a scoring opportunity, as both sides had chances but could not quite convert. Ewings had another chance just from inside the 50 from a set shot but her kick went to the right, and then Taylor launched from 50m but it bounced the wrong side of the post. North was firmly in control, but the Roosters had not landed the knockout blow. In the meantime, tempers were flaring with a number of players letting the opposition know how important the game was, with Hannah Munyard and Ewings having a number of fierce words, and actions, throughout the contest.

South needed to kick three unanswered goals in the final term if the Panthers were to get up and cause an upset, but time was against them, and so was the mighty impressive unit of the Roosters. The Panthers’ leading goalkicker and second overall in the competition, Jess Kirk had not touched the ball in the first three terms, but had a chance from the impossible angle early in the last quarter. Her kick was a great effort for a right footer on the wrong side, but it just missed, reducing the deficit to 14 points three minutes into the final stanza.

A crucial turnover in defence by North almost cost a goal but Campbell could not quite gather it and the troops arrived to knock the ball over the line. Every chance they got, North settled and assessed options, with the Panthers trying everything to heap pressure on their opposition. Gore became the only goalkicker in the final term after going for a mark and copping a contact to win a free, converting the major and with four minutes remaining, her side trailed by just seven points.

That solitary extra point was always going to be a pestering one, and coupled with the fact that the oblong ball can be unpredictable, the odds were always in North’s favour. South found that out after a quick kick out from Harvey looked destined to land in the arms of one of a number of South players pushed up to half-forward. Instead, it bounced between them and landed in the arms of Pope who had enjoyed an impressive game, kicking it forward and hitting a target. That bounce all but signalled the end for the Panthers, as with a couple of minutes left, Lauren Gauci took a number of crucial intercept marks, and North had done enough for the siren to sound and the Roosters enjoy the most memorable of victories.

It was no surprise to see Hatchard named as best-on for her efforts, with an otherwise even team performance across the board. Daniel ended the match with 16 disposals, four tackles and two inside 50s, while Taylor was influential in close with five clearances, four inside 50s and 14 touches. Pope had 15 disposals and three inside 50s, while Harvey was rock solid in defence with 11 disposals, two marks and five rebounds.

For South, Tahlia Meyer just battled away all day and finished with 18 disposals, four marks – one contested – two inside 50s and five rebounds, ahead of Gore (15 disposals, five marks, eight tackles, three inside 50s, two rebounds and two clearances). Whiteley (14 disposals, seven rebounds) and Buchanan (11 disposals, six rebounds) were keys in the back 50, while Campbell (13 disposals, four marks, three tackles and four inside 50s tried hard all day.

NORTH ADELAIDE 2.2 | 4.2 | 5.5 | 5.5 (35)
SOUTH ADELAIDE 2.0 | 3.1 | 3.2 | 4.4 (28)

GOALS:

North: B. Perry 2, C. Castle 2, H. Ewings.
South: T. Charlton, G. Schirmer, I. Tahau, N. Gore.

ADC BEST:

North: A. Hatchard, K. Pope, L. Daniel, K. Harvey, E. Sundstrom
South: T. Meyer, L. Whiteley, N. Gore, N. Campbell, L. Northcott

Picture: Deb Curtis / SANFL

2020 SANFL Women’s Grand Final preview: North Adelaide vs. South Adelaide

TWELVE months ago – or more accurately 16 months ago given the COVID-19 pandemic postponement – South Adelaide and North Adelaide faced off in the South Australian National Football League (SANFL) Women’s decider. Fast forward to 2020 and the same two sides oppose each other to determine this year’s premier in South Australia’s top women’s competition. The two best sides have made it through to the decider, and in Draft Central‘s preview, we take a look at the teams and where the game could be one, and some of the key questions coming out of it.

2020 FORM

North Adelaide come in as the clear favourites in this game simply because they are undefeated in 2020. South Adelaide are the next best side in it though, having only lost to the Roosters this year, first back in Round 4 prior to the SANFL Women’s postponement, and then a fortnight ago in the semi-final. Having backed up from that loss with an imposing win over an confident West Adelaide side, the Panthers will back themselves in to finally topple the Roosters.

The key questions

Can North Adelaide go undefeated in season 2020?

It might not be spoken about as the main aim – and nor it should be – in 2020, because at the end of the day, it does not matter how they are won, as long as they can get the job done. Eleven games in and the Roosters are yet to taste defeat, though they are likely to remember their last loss – the 2019 decider against the Panthers – and be keen to go one better this year.

Could South Adelaide achieve a three-peat?

Anything with the list the Panthers have is achievable. But they will need to rekindle their best form to get up in the match. They have the experience to follow through and get it done, but their opposition is formidable. The Panthers defence showed in the semi-final that it can contain the best of forward lines, and that effort will need to be repeated again here.

Who goes to Anne Hatchard?

There will not necessarily be a hard tag on Hatchard who has the running ability to just power away from her opponents, but Nicole Campbell did well in stints on Stevie-Lee Thompson and might be the player for the job again. Last time they met, Hatchard ran rampant and was clearly best afield, and while you cannot stop her getting her 30-odd touches a game, limiting them to non dangerous areas – ie. out of the stoppages particularly in the forward half – is a must.

Where does South Adelaide have the advantage?

The unpredictability and speed inside 50 is what sets the Panthers aside from many other teams. Jess Kirk is a leading forward and reliable in front of the big sticks, but a lot of the Panthers goals come from finding space inside 50 and lowering the eyes to hit targets from midfielders dropping back, or just by working the ball forward and creating something out of nothing. They can build from defence and run down the ground with speed.

Where does North Adelaide have the advantage?

The midfield is quite simply elite. South Adelaide’s is unbelievable, but the Roosters have the lot with Hatchard, Ash Woodland and Hannah Ewings, as well as Leah Tynan, Katelyn Pope and Erica Greet all capable of rotating through there. The South defence is well structured and back themselves one-on-one, but the Roosters have so many scoring options inside 50 and the midfielders usually pick the right option.

Line-by-line

North Adelaide defence vs. South Adelaide attack

The Roosters defence is tall compared to their opponents, with Kristi Harvey, Amber Ward and Talia Radan all capable of taking contested marks. It means the Panthers cannot afford to kick long and high inside 50. What they need is opening up space to allow one-on-ones because Kirk will struggle to be beaten on the lead, but in a one-on-one contest Harvey for example would take the chocolates. The half-forwards push up to the wings, with Indy Tahau and Gypsy Schirmer able to rotate with the likes of Teah Charlton and Cheyenne Hammond, which creates havoc with matchups. A chaos ball inside 50 while not perfect could help the Panthers at ground level, though Julia Clark and Lauren Gauci have been capable rebounders.

North Adelaide attack vs. South Adelaide defence

Up the other end, the matchups are a dream, with both sides having a number of in-between heights that could play the role of talls or smalls. Britt Perry is the one the Roosters love getting the ball too because of her reliability in front of the big sticks, while Cristie Castle continues to run all day. The pure speed of the attack such as Pope and Ewings might be a key reason why Hannah Munyard has been named in defence this week. She can match those quick players and also take the game on out of the back half, even though she is also capable of hitting the scoreboard up the other end. Woodland will spend time up forward, and like rotate with Ewings, while the South defence of Jaslynne Smith, Lisa Whiteley and Lauren Buchanan in particular is incredibly consistent.

The midfield battle

Starting in the ruck, the Panthers have a couple of young guns in Montana McKinnon and Brooklyn Kraft rotating through there. McKinnon has been getting better each week since returning from injury and capable of taking contested marks around the ground providing strong second efforts. She will be opposed to Bek Rasheed in the middle, with Kendall Howell named as backup on an extended bench. Rasheed has been terrific in her debut season for the Roosters and will need to work McKinnon hard around the ground and be offensively dangerous. The midfield has already been touches on for the Roosters, but for South, Hammond has been a really strong user of the ball, while Tahlia Meyer might be one of the best decision makers in the competition with her low darts inside 50 last week setting up so many scoring opportunities. With Elyse Haylock and Czenya Cavouras also running through there and the speed of Nikki Gore and Munyard, the South side will have no issues batting deep through the middle.

Teams

Prediction

Much like two weeks ago, it would take a brave prediction to go against the Roosters but this build up is going to special. The best team of the year against the best team of the past couple of years. Expect the game to go down to the wire and there be less than a kick between the sides by the final siren. With the Panthers likely to do all they can to restrict Hatchard, expect an Ewings or Woodland to be among the Most Valuable Player (MVP) contenders, while Tahau showed last year they are not afraid to give it to youth, and she and Charlton, along with Munyard and Gore would also be among the contenders if the Panthers get up.

Picture: SANFL/Deb Curtis

AFL Draft Watch: Tariek Newchurch (North Adelaide/South Australia)

IN the build up to football eventually returning, Draft Central takes a look at some of this year’s brightest names who have already represented their state in some capacity leading into 2020. While plenty can change between now and then, we will provide a bit of an insight into players, how they performed at pre-season testing, and some of our scouting notes on them from last year.

Next under the microscope in our AFL Draft watch is North Adelaide’s Tariek Newchurch, an exciting small forward with electric speed and x-factor in spades. The 181cm prospect is tied to the Adelaide Crows’ Next Generation Academy (NGA), giving supporters of the rebuilding club something to look forward to for years to come. Newchurch returned an impressive bottom-age campaign last year, booting 29 goals in 17 SANFL Under 18s outings, while also earning a Reserves berth. He is currently averaging a goal per game in 2020, having shown glimpses of his match-winning ability up forward. He looms as an outside chance of rising into the top 25 prospects overall.

PLAYER PAGE:

Tariek Newchurch
North Adelaide/South Australia

DOB: July 21, 2002

Height: 181cm
Weight: 73kg

Position: Small Forward

Strengths: Speed, evasiveness, x-factor, goal sense, clean hands
Improvements: Consistency, tackling

2020 SANFL Under 18s averages: 5 games | 15.2 disposals | 3.6 marks | 0.8 tackles | 1.4 clearances | 3.4 inside 50s | 1.0 goals (5)

PRESEASON TESTING RESULTS:

Standing vertical leap: 61cm
Running vertical leap (R/L): 62cm/76cm
Speed (20m): 2.96 seconds
Agility: 8.63 seconds
Endurance (Yo-yo): 20.1

>> Full Testing Results:
Jumps
20m Sprint
Agility
Yo-yo

2020 SCOUTING NOTES:

SANFL Under 18s Round 7 vs. Sturt

By: Michael Alvaro

Newchurch was North Adelaide’s other AFL Academy hub member to return to SANFL Under 18s duties, and again showed glimpses of his raw talent. The Adelaide Crows NGA hopeful has terrific agility and evasiveness, and constantly utilised that aspect of his game on Saturday. He was often sighted running hard up the ground to find the ball and create a spark for the Roosters with inboard kicks, while also getting busy close to goal. Newchurch’s ability to collect the ball from forward 50 stoppages at speed was outstanding, and almost earned him a goal on multiple occasions. While the pop in his set shots came under question early on, Newchurch eventually found the big sticks with a nice snap in the second term.

SANFL Under 18s Round 4 vs. WWT Eagles

By: Michael Alvaro

It was a patchy display from the Adelaide Next Generation Academy (NGA) hopeful, who looked lively on the ball but could not quite inflict the usual damage – going goalless from his 15 disposals and six marks. Nonetheless, Newchurch was clean in full stride and looked to make things happen with his various twists, turns, and creative passes going forward. He was forced to work up the ground early to find more ball, but had a set shot fall short from 25 metres out once he gained an opportunity inside 50. It didn’t stop the speedy Rooster from linking up well at half-forward, as he gained separation to be the primary marking target as North Adelaide won the centre clearances. Newchurch has a terrific leap and sticky hands on the lead, making it an effective ploy.

SANFL Under 18s Round 3 vs. Glenelg

By: Ed Pascoe

Newchurch had some close company and found it tough to get going in the early stages, pitted against Glenelg’s Hagan Wright. It wasn’t a good day in front of the scoreboard for Newchurch but he was still able to show off his dazzling speed and agility, and make it clear if given an inch, he can potentially take a mile. Newchurch started to come into the game more late in the piece once Wright was moved off him and he had a great bit of play, taking on fellow speedster Nasiah Wanganeen and winning that dual to show just how quick he is. Newchurch finished the game with 14 disposals and two behinds, but the main stat was zero tackles which he would want to improve to become a complete package as a small forward in future.

SANFL Under 18s Round 2 vs. Norwood

By: Tom Wyman

The Adelaide Next Generation Academy (NGA) prospect looked ominous whenever the ball was in his vicinity. As draft watchers have come to expect from Newchurch, his skills at ground-level were excellent. The forward’s burst of speed threatened to break the game open on a couple of occasions and his tackle numbers don’t reflect the pressure he inflicted on Norwood defenders.

He was thrown on-ball at stages and showed a willingness to get involved in the play instead of simply camping out in the forward 50. He laid a wonderful tackle to earn a free-kick inside 50 in the second term, but the resultant set shot hit the post. Newchurch showed class and composure when he gathered the ball deep inside 50 and snapped a brilliant goal under duress. While he probably didn’t have the four-quarter impact he would have been after, there’s no denying the talented Newchurch will feature prominently for SA at the upcoming National Championships.

SANFL Under 18s Round 1 vs. West Adelaide

By: Peter Williams

A tale of two halves for Newchurch, who went from an okay first half to a match-winning second half. It was clear even in patches through that first half he has the capability of doing something special with terrific speed on the lead, and great evasion techniques. He took a strong mark despite front-on contact about 40 metres out on a 45-degree angle, but his shot drifted to the left. His ability to get out of trouble was evident in the second term by earning a free kick for being held at half-forward.

The second half was something special though, as Newchurch stepped up to boot three goals, the first of which came eight and a half minutes into the third term. He received the handball and snapped around his body under pressure and then six minutes later kicked another one from a bit further out but with the same technique to sail home. Later in the term he took a great mark on the lead with his hands stretched in front of him, but the shot drifted across the face. His third goal game was the sealer when he lead out inside 50 to take a strong grab and put it straight through the middle. Not only did he finish the game with his execution, but he also applied pressure to opponents inside 50.

>> MORE NORTH ADELAIDE CONTENT

>> 2020 South Australia U18s Squad Prediction
>> August 2020 Power Rankings
>> July 2020 Power Rankings

>> CATCH UP ON OUR DRAFT WATCH SERIES

Allies:
Tahj Abberley
Charlie Byrne
Jackson Callow
Blake Coleman
Braeden Campbell
Alex Davies
Oliver Davis
Errol Gulden

South Australia:
Kaine Baldwin
Bailey Chamberlain
Zac Dumesny
Corey Durdin
Luke Edwards
Lachlan Jones
Caleb Poulter
Tom Powell
Taj Schofield
Riley Thilthorpe

Vic Country:
Sam Berry
Tanner Bruhn
Jack Ginnivan
Oliver Henry
Elijah Hollands
Zach Reid
Nick Stevens
Jamarra Ugle-Hagan

Vic Metro:
Jackson Cardillo
Nikolas Cox
Connor Downie
Eddie Ford
Bailey Laurie
Finlay Macrae
Reef McInnes
Archie Perkins
Will Phillips

Western Australia:
Heath Chapman
Denver Grainger-Barras
Logan McDonald
Nathan O’Driscoll
Brandon Walker
Joel Western
Isiah Winder

Caught the Eye: SANFL Women’s – Semi-Finals

A DOUBLE header at Thebarton Oval provided South Australian National Football League (SANFL) Women’s fans with plenty of top quality action, and we have taken a look at two players from each team that Caught the Eye. We have looked at players 21 years or younger, and have never been on an AFL Women’s list, showing the talent at state level which is bursting for a chance at the elite level.

NORTH ADELAIDE:

Hannah Ewings (midfielder/forward)

The bottom-age prospect has been one to watch since her debut in Round 1 this season earned her a Rising Star nomination. Now well established in the line-up for 2020, Ewings not only held her spot, but became one of the most dominant midfielders running around because of her speed, agility and game smarts to move through congestion with ease. In terms of 2022 top South Australian players, she would be right up there with the top group. Not only does she have the athletic traits, but she has a low bullet pass that is rare in players of her age – having the composure to lower the eyes when blazing away and hitting targets. Even more so, on the finals stage where she looked more than comfortable running around and against AFL Women’s opponents, was able to use her composure to be a key reason why her side got over the line and into a grand final.

Brianna Arthur (forward)

The 20-year-old is a damaging forward who plays a key role. She has her moments throughout games and usually always looks dangerous around the ball with nice pace on the lead. She protects the ball drop and can mark above her head or on her chest, and kick goals from multiple opportunities both in play and from set shots. This season she has really been a key component of the Roosters’ forward line and one that can just have her moments within quarters or games that stand out and help contribute for her side. She is one to watch coming into the grand final as she works well when leading out in conjunction with other teammates inside 50.

 

SOUTH ADELAIDE:

Teah Charlton (midfielder-forward)

There would not be too many surprised by Charlton making the list from the weekend given her already littered resume. She was a star at last year’s AFL Women’s Under-18 Championships as a middle-ager and was one who was as good in the air as she was at ground level. Charlton has terrific goal sense and has time and space when she wins it, as well as a penetrating kick and the ability to play in multiple roles. Spending time in defence this year as well as up forward and through the midfield, the likely top pick for the Crows this year continues to impress as one of only two top-age AFL Women’s Academy players. With an All-Australian to her name, as well as a SANFL Women’s Team of the Year selection, Charlton is a key player for the Panthers.

Indy Tahau (tall utility)

The other AFL Women’s Academy member who hails from the same side, Tahau is another utility who can roll through the ruck, or stand as a key forward. But what sets Tahau aside compared to other 180cm-odd players is her ridiculous speed. She showed on the weekend she is not afraid to take the game on, setting up a Panthers goal to Hannah Munyard with her ability to break the lines and go from half-back to half-forward. She has already proven she is capable on the big stage, winning best afield in South Adelaide’s premiership last year. She will be keen to put in a similar performance this time around if the Panthers can make it again, and upset North Adelaide in the decider in two weeks time. In terms of talls, Tahau is right up there with the top group in the draft crop.

 

WEST ADELAIDE:

Abbie Ballard (inside midfielder)

The top-age midfielder is one who you would just love on your team. She cracks in hard, lays a plethora of tackles throughout games and never takes a backwards step. She can play on the inside, outside or up forward, but she belongs under a pack where she fights tooth and nail for the ball. A real see-ball, get-ball player, Ballard is one who never gives in and you know what to expect from her. She showed it on the weekend in her second game back since missing a week for the Bloods. She might not have had the same amount of touches others did, but she was influential, particularly when the game was on the line, and led by example by bringing the heat and laying double-figure tackles around the ground, six of which came in the first term.

Zoe Venning (midfielder/forward)

An exciting, raw talent it is clear that Venning has a fair bit of upside to her game. She can sometimes do a touch too much, but that confidence is great to see, and Venning is one who with time will become a really dangerous player. Already she has no trouble finding the ball, and roams between the midfield and forward line, and takes the game on. She hits the scoreboard and sets others up, and while she will be disappointed she missed a golden opportunity running into goal, she got the first final jitters out of the way, and was still one of the Bloods best in the win. She has a lot to offer to the side, and is a point of difference in a side with a lot of inside ball winners as she has a touch of class to go with her hardness as well.

 

NORWOOD:

Matilda Zander (midfielder-forward)

Zander is still only 20-years-old and had the COVID-19 pandemic not ruined the chances of Victorian football, the Redlegs midfielder had signed on to run around with Collingwood in the VFL Women’s program. There are plenty of talents in the SANFL Women’s competition who have not yet been on an AFL Women’s list that are over 18, but Zander might just be the best of them in terms of upside. She is tough, has great speed, works hard around the ground and can play as a small forward as well as a midfielder. The interesting aspect of signing up to play with Collingwood in the VFL Women’s is that the AFL Women’s coach is Steve Symonds, her former mentor at the Redlegs.

Mattea Breed (utility)

An over-age utility who predominantly players through the midfield or up forward, Breed’s highlight package and best is as exciting as anyone’s. Still building consistency throughout games and round by round, Breed has the capability of dominating a game in a couple of quarters and kicking multiple goals. Her ability in the air is terrific, and she is mobile enough to cause headaches at ground level. She loves to move the ball quickly, and is a contested marking specialist, having represented Northern Territory and Central Allies at the AFL Women’s Under 18 Championships. Seemingly having improved on last season, Breed continues to build aspects of her game to show she has areas of improvement for the future.