Tag: National Combine

Top 10s: 2020 National AFL Draft Combine

AFL DRAFT combines have wrapped up around the nation, giving an insight into how each elite level hopeful stacks up athletically. For most prospects, it was a chance to showcase just how much they had improved since preseason, especially after a full season of football – albeit compromised. For the Victorians in action, they finally got to show their wares after a substantial amount of time away from the field, with a number of them registering results indicative of remarkably hard work in the meantime.

Having taken a look at the top 10 results from each test, we now look back at the combines as a whole to further put under the microscope those who performed well across the board. Needless to say, these athletes can certainly play too, with plenty of first round prospects scattered across the pointy end of each leaderboard. Furthermore, these are the players who have earned National Combine invites; meaning they have done so at the request of at least three-four AFL clubs, or by having previously earned passage into their respective academy hubs.

>> SCROLL for all the top 10 results

Among the top overall performers, three West Australians managed top 10 results across four different tests. Peel Thunder’s Isiah Winder is arguably the best draft prospect of the lot, a classy small midfielder who achieved top two results in the standing vertical jump and running vertical jump (right). To top it off, he also came fifth in the 20m sprint and sixth in the agility test. He uses all those traits on-field too, and looms as a potential second round pick. West Perth defender Kellen Johnson and Fremantle Next Generation Academy (NGA) member Chris Walker were the other two WA products to complete the feat, doing so in all three jumps and the agility test.

Godfrey Okerenyang, who took out the 2018 AFL Grand Final sprint and comes from a strong athletics background, was the only other player to manage top 10 results in four different tests. The GWS Academy hopeful leapt for the biggest standing vertical jump (84cm) and running vertical jump (right, 92cm), while also placing third in the 20m sprint. His podium finish in the running vertical jump (left) rounded out the four-peat. He looms as a more prospective pick at this year’s draft, having only recently committed to pursuing a footballing career.

Another two high-upside late chances who are already tied to clubs in Josh Eyre (Essendon, NGA) and Aiden Fyfe (Gold Coast, Academy) each racked up hat-tricks of top 10 features. Like most of the others, they were prominent in the jumping tests, while also respectively running the eight and ninth-best 20m times. In the most compromised draft crop ever, the likes of Reef McInnes (Collingwood NGA) took out first place in the speed test with a searing time of 2.78 seconds, while Sydney Academy member Braeden Campbell and Bulldogs NGA gun Jamarra Ugle-Hagan were also among that top 10 with equal times of 2.90 seconds. The latter two are expected to attract bids within the top 10.

There were plenty of other first round prospects to light up the track, too. WA key defenders Denver Grainger-Barras and Heath Chapman showed their wares in the agility and endurance departments respectively, while fellow sandgroper Jack Carroll was a standout jumper – even while sporting a cast on his broken wrist. Archie Perkins was another to impress in multiple categories, with Vic Metro hub teammates Finlay Macrae and Nikolas Cox acing the 2km time trial. Others to excel across the board included Nathan O’Driscoll, a second round candidate, and Brodie Lake, who hails from the Northern Territory but made the move to South Australia this year. He is eligible to be pre-listed by the Gold Coast Suns via their access to the Darwin zone.

NATIONWIDE AFL DRAFT COMBINE TOP 10s

Standing Vertical Jump:

1. Godfrey Okerenyang (GWS Academy) – 84cm
=2. Isiah Winder (Peel Thunder) – 76cm
=2. Pierce Roseby (Sydney Academy) – 76cm
=4. Jack Carroll (East Fremantle) – 74cm
=4. Chris Walker (East Fremantle) – 74cm
=6. Kellen Johnson (West Perth) – 73cm
=6. Shannon Neale (South Fremantle) – 73cm
8. Harry Grant (GWS Academy) – 70cm
=9. Jaiden Hunter (Perth) – 69cm
=9. Sam Frost (GWS Academy) – 69cm

Running Vertical Jump (R):

=1. Godfrey Okerenyang (GWS Academy) – 92cm
=1. Isiah Winder (Peel Thunder) – 92cm
=3. Seamus Mitchell (Bendigo Pioneers) – 91cm
=3. Archie Perkins (Sandringham Dragons) – 91cm
5. Chris Walker (East Fremantle) – 90cm
=6. Josh Eyre (Calder Cannons) – 87cm
=6. Denver Grainger-Barras (Swan Districts) – 87cm
=8. Liam McMahon (Northern Knights) – 86cm
=8. Shannon Neale (South Fremantle) – 86cm
=10. 4x players (Isaac Chugg, Aiden Fyfe, Jack Carroll, Kellen Johnson)

Running Vertical Jump (L):

1. Dominic Bedendo (Murray Bushrangers) – 99cm
=2. Godfrey Okerenyang (GWS Academy) – 95cm
=2. Aiden Fyfe (Gold Coast Academy) – 95cm
=4. Kellen Johnson (West Perth) – 94cm
=4. Sam Berry (Gippsland Power) – 94cm
=4. Brodie Lake (NT Thunder/Central District) – 94cm
=4. Jack Briskey (Brisbane Academy) – 94cm
=4. Eddie Ford (Western Jets) – 94cm
=9. Chris Walker (East Fremantle) – 93cm
=9. Josh Eyre (Calder Cannons) – 93cm

20m Sprint:

1. Reef McInnes (Oakleigh Chargers) – 2.78 seconds
2. Max Holmes (Sandringham Dragons) – 2.80
3. Godfrey Okerenyang (GWS Academy) – 2.86
4. Liam Kolar (Northern Knights) – 2.87
5. Isiah Winder (Peel Thunder) – 2.873
=6. Zavier Maher (Murray Bushrangers) – 2.89
=6. Seamus Mitchell (Bendigo Pioneers) – 2.88
8. Joshua Eyre (Calder Cannons) – 2.89
9. Aiden Fyfe (Gold Coast Academy) – 2.898
=10. Braeden Campbell (Sydney Academy) – 2.90
=10. Fraser Rosman (Sandringham Dragons) – 2.90
=10. Jamarra Ugle-Hagan (Oakleigh Chargers) – 2.90

Agility Test:

1. Brodie Lake (NT Thunder/Central District) – 7.90 seconds
2. Mitchell Duval (West Adelaide) – 7.98
3. Harry Grant (GWS Academy) – 8.00
4. Nathan O’Driscoll (Perth) – 8.12
5. Denver Grainger-Barras (Swan Districts) – 8.13
6. Isiah Winder (Peel Thunder) – 8.18
7. Marc Sheather (Sydney Academy) – 8.23
=8. Kellen Johnson (West Perth) – 8.27
=8. Chris Walker (East Fremantle) – 8.27
10. Taj Schofield (WWT Eagles) – 8.31

2km Time Trial:

1. Harry Sharp (GWV Rebels) – 5 minutes, 28 seconds
2. Fraser Rosman (Sandringham Dragons) – 5:52
3. Liam Kolar (Northern Knights) – 6:02
4. Nikolas Cox (Northern Knights) – 6:03
5. Sam Berry (Gippsland Power) – 6:10
6. Ryan Angwin (Gippsland Power) – 6:11
=7. Matthew Allison (Calder Cannons) – 6:17
=7. Finlay Macrae (Oakleigh Chargers) – 6:17
9. Heath Chapman (West Perth) – 6:20
=10. Nathan O’Driscoll (Perth) – 6:23
=10. Archie Perkins (Sandringham Dragons) – 6:23
=10. Will Bravo (Dandenong Stingrays) – 6:23

>> Power Rankings: November Update

Combine results in full:
Jumps
20m Sprint
Agility
2km

Preseason testing results:
Jumps
20m Sprint
Agility
Yo-yo

Featured Image: Oakleigh’s Finlay Macrae runs the 20-metre sprint | Credit: Graham Denholm/AFL Photos

Top 10s: 2020 National Draft Combine – 2km time trial

AFL DRAFT combines have wrapped up around the nation, giving an insight into how each elite level hopeful stacks up athletically. For most prospects, it was a chance to showcase just how much they had improved since preseason, especially after a full season of football – albeit compromised. For the Victorians in action, they finally got to show their wares after a substantial amount of time away from the field, with a number of them registering results indicative of remarkably hard work in the meantime.

Having already looked at the 20-metre sprint times, agility test results, and vertical jumping tests, we finally shift our focus to the 2km time trial. This test is used to measure a player’s endurance, taking over from the yo-yo test conducted during preseason. The 2km distance is also a good barometer of athletes’ speed-endurance mix, providing a snippet of how they may fare in more manageable stints rather than a full 10-15km distance they may run in-game. Typically, times of under six minutes and 30 seconds are considered high-level.

>> SCROLL for the full top 10 times

For the second year running, the time trial record was broken by a Greater Western Victoria (GWV) Rebels product. Former steeplechaser Harry Sharp soundly beat Jay Rantall‘s 2019 effort of 5:50 over the 2km, notching a blistering time of 5:28 to standalone as the clear nationwide leader. A draft bolter of sorts, Sharp is a zippy outside midfielder/forward with plenty of upside. 194cm Sandringham Dragons forward Fraser Rosman is another in the same boat, and went close to Rantall’s record himself with an effort of 5:52, the only other time of under six minutes.

Northern Knights talls Liam Kolar and Nikolas Cox ran side-by-side to finish a second apart just over the six-minute mark, while Gippsland Power midfield pair Sam Berry and Ryan Angwin continued the two-by-two trend, albeit at different combines. Three players were tied for 10th spot at 6:23, including top 15 chance Archie Perkins. Fellow first round candidate Heath Chapman came in ninth just ahead of that three-man group, and impressive effort considering his status as a key position defender. He and Nathan O’Driscoll were the only non-Victorians to register top 10 times, and were the best runners out of Western Australia.

Obviously it is quite difficult to compare the 2km efforts with that of preseason yo-yo tests, which also serve to measure an athlete’s endurance. However, O’Driscoll again ranked equal-10th in the nationwide results for said test, notching a score of 21.8. Berry was also a standout during preseason, with his score of 21.7 good enough for equal-fourth among his Victorian peers. Both are tireless midfielders who translate this data to their on-field efforts, boding well for a swift adjustment to the rigours of AFL football.

Top 10 2km time trial results:

1. Harry Sharp (GWV Rebels) – 5 minutes, 28 seconds*
2. Fraser Rosman (Sandringham Dragons) – 5:52
3. Liam Kolar (Northern Knights) – 6:02
4. Nikolas Cox (Northern Knights) – 6:03
5. Sam Berry (Gippsland Power) – 6:10
6. Ryan Angwin (Gippsland Power) – 6:11
=7. Matthew Allison (Calder Cannons) – 6:17
=7. Finlay Macrae (Oakleigh Chargers) – 6:17
9. Heath Chapman (West Perth) – 6:20
=10. 3x players (Nathan O’Driscoll, Archie Perkins, Will Bravo) – 6:23

* – denotes all-time combine record.

>> Power Rankings: November Update

Other Draft Combine results:
Jumps
20m Sprint
Agility

Preseason testing:
Jumps
20m Sprint
Agility test
Yo-yo test

Featured Image: Players run the 2km time trial at the Regional Victoria Draft Combine | Credit: Robert Cianflone/AFL Photos

Lachlan Carrigan – The dashing Dragon no longer flying under the radar

LACHLAN Carrigan has enjoyed a steep rise in draft stocks this year, and he hasn’t even registered an official game of footy. The Sandringham Dragons speedster is a prospect billed with the increasingly popular buzzword, ‘upside’. A December birth, Carrigan is one of the youngest top-agers available in this year’s draft pool and has seen his rate of development climb rapidly since making his NAB League debut in Round 11, last year.

The most promising part? He still has plenty of growing and improvement left.

“I guess just the potential that I have with my body being a December birth, the upside of me growing (is a trait recruiters value),” Carrigan told Draft Central. “My grandfather is 6’6″ and my uncle’s 6’4″ so I’ve got a lot of growing left in me and I’ll fill out obviously.”

While his growth has hardly been stunted, Carrigan’s on-field feats were limited to a couple of big preseason performances which built upon the promise shown in five outings for Sandringham in 2019. The 17-year-old not only grew to 189cm, but was also able to showcase his expanded athletic base with outstanding preseason testing results.

His speed-endurance mix was on full show; registering a 2.91-second 20-metre sprint, 21.6 score on the yo-yo test, and even running vertical jumps of over 80cm off either foot. It meant on top of his eye-catching returns on-field, recruiters also had some data which jumped off the page, keeping Carrigan’s name fresh in their minds.

While he had hoped to really press his case to be drafted in 2020, Carrigan says he had not been particularly “fazed” by garnering perhaps a little less attention than some of his highly-touted teammates, at least coming into the year.

“It’s something you get used to, just going under the radar,” he said. “Unfortunately I couldn’t play this year, I was really excited to showcase what I can do (and earn) the team success we thought we could achieve. But always going under the radar hasn’t really fazed me, I’ve put in the hard work that needs to be done and achieved things.”

Lachlan Carrigan on the move for Sandringham | Source: Supplied

Carrigan’s motivation is far from waning either, even in the face of Melbourne’s Covid-19 restrictions. The Hampton Rovers junior was able to set up a home gym with equipment from his former club, while also doing touch work and running throughout the week. With Year 12 studies at St. Bede’s College also thrown in the mix, there is plenty on Carrigan’s plate, though he says life has been “pretty cruisy” of late.

“I’m pretty much kicking every day, just with mates doing whatever we can do,” he said. “On top of that I’ll also be out (at the) gym four to five times a week and then just running as well. But it’s pretty cruisy, lots of study too.

“Dad works at Hampton Rovers so we went in and got a lot of their gym equipment. We set them all up in the backyard and in the lounge room so that’s been really good. And then just using the facilities around in the 5km (radius) I guess.

“The motivation is always there for me when it comes to footy. Maybe not as much with school but definitely for footy. Training, whether it’s in the weight room, running or just doing the extras, I think the motivation comes easily.”

The AFL hopeful has also been in contact with around a dozen clubs throughout the year and is beginning to gauge how the next few months, or even year may pan out. A Carlton fan, Carrigan hasn’t spoken to the Blues just yet but is planning for multiple outcomes by the end of 2020. With the NAB League extended to an Under 19 competition, the chance to prove himself at that level remains should he be overlooked in this year’s draft.

“(Discussions with clubs) have been really mixed,” Carrigan said. “I don’t think many clubs have delved into the talks about where they’d pick me up. We get a few, but it has been a mix of ‘we’ll pick you up in the late rounds and take a punt’ or ‘we want to see you play more footy’.

“I’m pretty academic… after school, I’m still deciding if I go back to the Dragons. I just want to put in all my effort there and maybe if I’ve got enough free time around halfway through the year I’ll pick up a (university) course. The courses I’m looking at are probably accounting or commerce, and also sports management.”

The running wingman also does a fair bit of footballing study, moulding his game on the likes of Hugh McCluggage for his inside and outside balance, as well as Josh Kelly and Isaac Smith.

“I love footy so I watch a lot of it,” he said. “I think I’m very versatile (but) my favourite position is probably the wing, just because I’ve played there the most and I know how to play it.

“I’ve been working hard on a lot of areas. I think my main areas over the summer, this preseason, were just my contested work and my ability to hit the scoreboard. You can get better at everything I guess.”

While much of his journey, especially of late, has been carried out among the unknown, Carrigan says he has had “a lot of great coaches and mentors” to lean on throughout the experience.

“(Sandringham assistant) Jackson Kornberg‘s been really good this year, Simon McPhee and (Mark) ‘Bomber’ Reilly too,” he said.

Carrigan’s next point of call will be at the Vic Metro Draft Combine on Saturday, though he will not participate in the testing. Draft day looms on the week of December 7.

Scouting Notes: 2020 WAFL Colts Grand Final – Claremont vs. Subiaco

SUBIACO took out the 2020 WAFL Colts Grand Final on Sunday, trumping reigning premier and warm favourite, Claremont by 59 points at Fremantle Oval. Our scouts were on hand to take note of some of the outstanding performers, including AFL Academy members, Next Generation Academy prospects, and recent National Combine invitees.

Please consider that each set of notes showcases the opinions of our scouts individually, and there are only so many players we can keep an eye on each week.

Claremont:

#2 Logan Young

It was a quieter game for the big-bodied midfielder, but Young still managed a solid outing and a balanced game. Young covered the ground well, doing some nice work inside the contests but also working hard to push back and help his defenders. Young was later moved forward to switch things up and took a nice mark on the wing. At his size, he could be a hard match up as a midfielder who can push forward and make an impact. Young finished the game with 17 disposals, five marks, and six tackles.

#10 Joel Western

The smooth moving captain of Claremont did all he could to try and get his side over the line. A strong four-quarter performer, he could hold his head high. Western was very silky playing through the midfield, often running from congestion with ease and delivering multiple slick handballs. While not always accurate, he was getting plenty of penetration on his kicks and he would have likely had the most metres gained from his side. Western showed he had a few tricks with a scissor kick over his head in the last quarter – although not exactly effective, it did show his athleticism. Western finished the game with 25 disposals and the Fremantle NGA prospect will now look towards the All-Star games taking place in the next few weeks to continue to show to recruiters his special talent.

#21 Jack Avery

Another big game from the underrated defender who was a recent call-up to the AFL combine, and you could see why with the intercepting machine starting the game in fine form. He showed great courage early with a strong intercept and contested mark, and continued in a similar manner as he went back wit the flight in the second quarter. Despite a hiccup close to goal that lead to an opposition major, he was his side’s best player in the first half. Avery was moved into the midfield in the second half and still won plenty of the ball. Midfield is a position he can hopefully play in the All-Stars games to show off his versatility. While his disposal let him down from the midfield, he had no issues winning it despite not playing the role at all this year. Avery finished with 33 disposals and seven marks and was certainly one of his side’s better players who played hard for four quarters.

#23 Jacob Van Rooyen

The talented 2021 key position prospect started the game in fine form, kicking a nice set shot goal and doing well in ruck contests inside attacking 50. His marking is a strength which he showed all game, but it was his nimbleness that really stood out in a nice passage of play in the second quarter as he streamed through the middle of the ground and kicked long inside 50, showing his athleticism. He would show that athleticism again in the last quarter, almost kicking a nice running goal from long range that just missed. Van Rooyen was moved into the midfield after the game was already lost and he showed some great signs, especially at the first centre bounce, showing a lot of energy by looking to get involved and throw his big frame around. Van Rooyen finished with 17 disposals, five marks and kicked 1.1 in an impressive outing that will help build into his draft year in 2021.

#28 Kalin Lane

Lane was the standout ruck on the ground with his tapwork and follow-up work being first class. Standing at 204cm, it was great to see a player of his size so willing to tackle and impact the contests after his ruckwork. He was rewarded for it with a nice tackle which yielded a holding the ball call in the first quarter. Some of his tapwork was sublime, especially one to his teammate Western who couldn’t have asked for better silver service. His marking around the ground was also strong, which is what you want from your primary ruckman. Lane was a strong four-quarter performer with 14 disposals, five marks and 32 hit outs as he made claims to be the premier ruckman in this year’s draft.

Subiaco:

#12 Matthew Johnson

Perhaps Western Australia’s best prospect going into the 2021 draft, the tall midfielder showed a lot of class with his ability to win the ball in close and distribute by hand cleanly to his teammates’ advantage. His vision by hand was outstanding, whether it was from a clearance or in general play. There was one fine example in the second quarter where he faked a handball nicely and then quickly dished off a perfect pass to his teammate to release him into space. Johnson’s goal came in the second quarter after earning a free kick. His second half was huge, winning plenty of the ball at ease and using it effectively by hand and foot. He had another great play in the last quarter, attacking the ground ball hard, cleanly giving a handball, getting it back, and almost evading another tackle before getting done in the back. Johnson had a complete game in the midfield, finishing with 21 disposals, five marks, six tackles and a goal.

#13/17 Lachlan Vanirsen

What a week it has been for Vanirsen, who capped it off by winning the Mel Whinnen Medal for best on ground after taking out the Jack Clarke Medal as best and fairest of the WAFL Colts earlier in the week, and a premiership medal to go with it. A deserving winner of the each medal, Vanirsen was unstoppable through the midfield where he showed a great mix of class, hard work and impact. He had a number change to start the second quarter, going from 13 to 17 which may have confused some onlookers. He went into full attacking mode in the second half, kicking a lovely goal by crumbing and snapping truly to put the game beyond doubt at that point. He made plenty of chances in the last quarter to add to his goal tally and he really deserved another goal. His work-rate was highlighted with one passage of play where he got multiple possessions starting from defence, and finally latched onto the last chain inside 50 where he won a free kick, but would miss the long range shot at goal. Vanirsen can’t have done much more to help his draft stocks with 33 disposals, 11 marks, five tackles, and 1.3. He will have more chances to stake his claim with the upcoming All-Star games, too.

#22 Blake Morris

Morris started the game slowly but really came into his own in the second half, becoming an intercept marking machine which is a role he played well at last year’s Under 16 championships. Despite not having the size to play as a true key position player, he has shown a great ability to play taller with his marking ability, but what also stood out was his ground level play. Morris showed some great composure and agility to evade opponents, as he rarely gets caught. The third quarter showcased his intercept marking and his work down back really gave Claremont no chance of making any damaging forward entries. Although his kicking was shaky at times, Morris was certainly one of his side’s most damaging players, finishing with 16 disposals and eight marks. Like a few other teammates, he will get more chances to show his wares in the upcoming All-Star games.

#23 Sandon Page

Page has been a constant scoring force for Subiaco this year, but it was his set-up and outlet work up the ground where he was found to be most damaging and useful for his side on this occasion. Page didn’t waste much time with his disposals, often providing a hard contest, gathering cleanly, and quickly forcing the ball forward at all costs, which was a good ploy in a Grand Final when territory can be so important. He would be rewarded for his work up the ground with some goals in the third quarter; one coming from a free kick close to goal, and another being a mark close to goal where he would slot both set shots with ease. Page had a solid outing with 12 disposals and two goals while also setting up others. He is another Subiaco product who will play in the upcoming All-Star games.

#33 Neil Erasmus

Erasmus sure does know how to find the goals. The bottom-ager provided an early spark for Subiaco, helping the Lions get away with three first-half majors. Having plied his trade for Hale School during the PSA season, Erasmus only made his WAFL Colts debut in Round 9, and booted his maiden goal during the first term of this outing. Blink, and you may have missed all four of his scores, as the lively forward showed great goal sense to quickly put boot to ball and find the big sticks each time. His ability to compete aerially, and then show a clean pair of heels across the ground was excellent, as commentators likened him to Port youngster, Mitch Georgiades. He seems a promising, raw prospect for next year with plenty of scope.

Featured Image: Subiaco and Claremont’s fliers contest for a mark | Source: (Retrieved from) @WAFLOfficial via Twitter

Scouting Notes: 2020 WAFL Colts – Finals Week 1

IN WEEK one of the Simply Energy WAFL Colts Finals Series, Claremont defeated Subiaco by 15 points to advance through to the Grand Final, while East Fremantle knocked off West Perth to earn a spot in week two.

Below were the standout players from either game. Please consider that each set of notes showcases the opinions of our scouts individually, and there are only so many players we can keep an eye on each week.

>> Power Rankings: September Edition

Claremont vs. Subiaco

By: Lenny Fogliani

Claremont:

#2 Logan Young

The son of AFL player manager Colin Young, Logan was at his powerful best in the midfield. He finished with 26 possessions (14 contested), 10 clearances, 9 tackles, 3 marks and 3 inside 50s.

#4 Jake Willson

The Wembley Downs junior continued his stunning season with another accomplished performance. He accumulated 22 possessions (12 contested), laid a game-high 11 tackles, grabbed 3 marks, won 2 clearances and kicked a goal.

#10 Joel Western

The Fremantle Dockers’ Next Generation Academy member was electric in the middle for the Tigers. He finished with 24 possessions (12 contested), 4 tackles, 4 clearances, 3 inside 50s, 2 rebounding 50s, 2 marks and a goal.

#20 Logan Guelfi

The younger brother of Essendon’s Matt Guelfi, Logan was dynamic on the half-forward flank for the Tigers. He accumulated 16 possessions (7 contested), recorded 5 inside 50s and kicked a goal.

#21 Jack Avery

The Cottesloe junior was rock-solid in defence for Claremont, finishing with 20 possessions (8 contested), 7 marks (3 contested), 5 rebounding 50s, and 3 tackles.

#23 Jacob Van Rooyen

The 17-year-old was arguably best afield, after he finished with 14 possessions (9 contested), 7 marks (5 contested), 7 inside 50s, 2 tackles and 2 goals. The only blemish on his performance were his three behinds.

#28 Kalin Lane

The Denmark-Walpole product was inspirational in the ruck for Claremont. He gathered 16 possessions (13 contested), won 39 hit-outs, accomplished 10 clearances, recorded 3 inside 50s, and laid 3 tackles.

>> MORE CLAREMONT CONTENT

Subiaco:

#2 Jed Kemp

The nephew of West Coast great Dean Kemp was fantastic for Subiaco, finishing with 19 possessions (13 contested), 10 tackles, 7 clearances, and a goal.

#8 Jaxon McGowan

The Kingsway junior was excellent in defence for Subiaco. He accumulated 14 possessions (6 contested), took 3 marks, and recorded 3 rebounding 50s and 2 inside 50s.

#12 Matthew Johnson

The North Beach junior worked tirelessly for the Lions, finishing with 17 possessions (13 contested), 9 tackles, 4 clearances and a goal.

#22 Blake Morris

The Kingsley junior was exceptional in defence for the Lions. He collected 16 possessions (9 contested), took 4 marks, laid 3 tackles, and recorded 3 inside 50s and 2 rebounding 50s.

#41 Tyler Brockman

The cousin of former Fremantle and Gold Coast player Greg Broughton, Brockman was terrific in the midfield for the Lions. He finished with 15 possessions (6 contested), 4 tackles, 3 clearances and 2 inside 50s.

>> MORE SUBIACO CONTENT

West Perth vs. East Fremantle

By: Ed Pascoe

West Perth:

#6 Callum Johnson

Johnson’s strong season was recently rewarded with the 19-year-old earning selection for the WA All-Stars game. He continued to do what he has done best this year, and that’s win plenty of the ball around stoppages, where he has shown a great partnership with ruckman Michael Mallard. The conditions suited Johnson with the wet weather and regular stoppages allowed him to to show what he does best – win clearances and show his attacking mindset in winning the hard ball. He finished the game with 28 disposals and 9 tackles. 22 of his disposals were kicks, showing his smarts to get ball on boot in the wet weather.

#14 Lochlan Paton

The talented bottom-age midfielder earned selection in the WA All-Star games and although he played forward for West Perth in this game, he still managed to show why he is rated highly going into his draft year in 2021. The dynamic Paton always looked dangerous whenever the ball went his way inside 50, usually darting around opponents and making things happen. In one certain play during the first quarter, he would use a sort of karate kick to nudge the ball over his head, just showing how dynamic he can be. Paton really stood out with his clean hands in the poor conditions and you could certainly see his midfield traits coming to the fold. He didn’t kick and goals but always looked a threat and finished the game with 11 disposals and 5 marks.

#17 Logan Foley

The strong bodied Foley certainly has his fans, earning selection in the WA All-Stars squad, and he played an important role as a tall forward who would help relieve Michael Mallard in the ruck. What really surprised in his short time rucking was how clean his taps were to his teammates, especially in the conditions. He used his body well at stoppages to help protect the fall of the ball, too. Foley didn’t hit the scoreboard and the conditions certainly didn’t suit big forwards, but he showed some good signs finishing the game with 8 disposals and 7 hit-outs.

#18 Corey Rundle

It was tough going for Rundle, who remains the leading goalkicker in the Colts. He was opposed by fellow WA All-Star representative Keanu Haddow in what was a great battle all day. Rundle started the game well with a strong mark close to goal and nailing the set shot. He had a chance later in the quarter running into goal, but he was pressured and just missed. Haddow did a great job of keeping Rundle quiet for the next few quarters, with the conditions and East Fremantle’s team defence really making life hard for Rundle. He had one last highlight in the last quarter, showing nice movement and snapping to the hot spot which almost bounced into goal anyway, but alas would be a behind. Rundle finished the game with 4 disposals and kicking 1.2.

#19 Kellen Johnson

The conditions didn’t suit West Perth’s twin interceptors Heath Chapman and Johnson, and it was apparent early when Johnson couldn’t get his hands on the ball. But as the game went on, he got involved in other ways and as good defenders do – defending with strong tackles and timely spoils. Speaking of tackles and spoils, he laid a certain goal-saving tackle in the second quarter and numerous spoils in the third, using his strong ability to read the play. It was nice to see Johnson do the team things and not worry too much about winning intercepts and playing the flashier role. He did what needed to be done and finished the game with 7 disposals and 3 tackles.

#24 Michael Mallard

Ruckmen come into their own in the wet conditions, especially a player of Mallards size and skill. He was enormous in the ruck, winning plenty of hit-outs and showing a good relationship between his midfielders, especially Callum Johnson. Mallard, for his size, showed great movement and skill with ball in hand and was hardly a slouch when not rucking, using his big left boot to good effect. He had a nice bit of play in the second quarter, taking a nice intercept mark and even taking the player on that was on the mark. Mallard did his best to try and get his side over the line and he finished with 9 disposals, 3 marks and a whopping 49 hit outs as he builds to the WA All-Star games to come.

#25 Heath Chapman

Not the best conditions for the highly rated Chapman to show his best features, which are his clean hands overhead and intercept marking. He had a slow start but worked into he game nicely in the second half. He was clean with his handling of the ball in one instance, but missed the handball, but it was impressive to see him work hard to make up for the mistake. He took a few nice intercept marks despite the conditions and to make up for the lack of marking, he showed great elusiveness and rebound from defence – usually using the ball well by foot and unafraid to take the game on. Chapman finished the game with 16 disposals and 6 marks which was decent considering the conditions.

>> MORE WEST PERTH CONTENT

East Fremantle:

#3 Corey Warner

The younger brother of 2019 Swans draftee Chad Warner proved he is a great prospect for the 2021 draft, as the young midfielder was arguably best on ground in an impressive display, playing forward and on the wing. Playing most of the year with his school team Aquinas, he has come into the East Fremantle Colts team at a timely time and he was pivotal in their victory over West Perth. He set the scene early with a nice gather and snap goal and he just looked dangerous for the whole quarter, looking clean and sharp in the wet conditions. He played the rest of the first half with plenty of enthusiasm, moving the ball quickly and tackling hard. His best highlight, however, came in the third quarter when he executed a Dusty Martin-like don’t argue which was impressive for his size. He also laid a great tackle in the same quarter winning the free kick in defence. Warner was impressive with his skill, tenacity, and eagerness to get involved all day. He finished the game with 24 disposals, 4 tackles and a goal.

#6 Joshua Browne

Starting the year down back playing as a silky rebound defender, he has become an impressive ball winning midfielder in recent weeks. Not unlike former East Fremantle player Trent Rivers, who has been impressive for Melbourne this year, Browne looks classy with ball in hand and is a nice size to play a range of roles. He did it all, winning plenty of clearances but also getting on the outside to take marks and set up play with his nice kicking and execution by hand, which was most impressive in-tight. He had a nice bit of play in the third quarter weaving through multiple opponents with ease, but would sadly turn the ball over by foot in a rare skill error for him. Browne was sensational and he proved why he was one of 10 bottom-age players to be selected to play in the WA All-Star games, finishing the game with a game high 28 disposals to go with 5 marks and 8 tackles in a complete midfield display.

#7 Chris Walker

Both he and his twin brother, Brandon had an influence, with Chris causing havoc up forward. He would kick a nice goal in the first quarter after winning a high free kick and slotting the set shot in very wet conditions. One of his concerns thoughout the day was his fumbles and he would drop an easy chest mark in the second quarter, but he still did well to keep involved throughout the game and would finish his game nicely with a dribble goal in the last quarter. The Fremantle NGA prospect finished with 14 disposals and kicked 2.1 in a solid outing.

#8 Finn Gorringe

Along with teammates Warner and Browne you could say Gorringe was one of the best players on the day, with his skills and intercept work down back proving important in the wet and tough conditions. Gorringe was often trusted with the kick-outs where he did well with his long and accurate kicking being used in general play as well. His ability to get to the right spots and stay composed was certainly impressive as it seemed he was always in the way when West Perth was attacking. With so many players rushing their disposals, he set the tone for his team in staying composed and using the ball well, and that style of play is what gave East Fremantle the edge. Gorringe finished the game with 24 disposals and 10 marks and he is really starting to make the backline role his own after starting the season as a bustling inside midfielder.

#9 Brandon Walker

He and his twin brother Chris proved a handful, with Brandon playing his preferred role down back. His confidence with ball in hand and clean hands certainly caught the eye as the Fremantle NGA prospect continues to have a strong season. Walker had most of his highlights in the second half, starting with an impressive contested mark especially in the conditions. The last quarter was Walker at his best, starting with a strong tackle that was rewarded, and he would soon after take an impressive intercept mark. Another great moment was when he was told to play on in defence and somehow was able to pull off a don’t argue on one opponent coming from the side, and then evade his way around another in a classy bit of play that really showed his mix of class and athleticism – both of which make him such a good prospect. Walker finished the game with 19 disposals and 5 marks.

#10 Jed Hagan

It’s hard to believe Hagan wont be draft eligible until 2022 and he certainly looks to be WA’s leading contender for that draft. He started the game on fire winning, plenty of the ball and despite his age, he already has a solid frame and a tough attitude to excel in the wet conditions. Hagan’s disposal was often very good, especially his kicking in the wet conditions while not always taking the safe option. He faded a little in the seconf half but he was still able to show why he is such an exciting prospect for the future. He finished the game with 14 disposals and 5 tackles.

#13 Keanu Haddow

Haddow had the tough role playing on the Colts leading goal scorer in Rundle, and you could say he got the better of him, keeping the talented forward to only 1 goal. He didn’t get much of the ball early but he had some nice defensive efforts and timely spoils against Rundle. His intercept game is very strong and it really started to come to the fold in the last quarter once the game was just about done and dusted. He just played his normal game and had the ball on a string, getting up the ground but when it was his turn to defend he still did so, taking a very impressive mark against Rundle. The Fremantle NGA prospect finished the game with 23 disposals and 8 marks and while his intercept game and defensive efforts are outstanding, he will need to work on his kicking – especially close to goal as he has a few nervous moments every game. If he cleans up this side of his game, it will go a long way to Fremantle committing to him at the end of the year.

>> MORE EAST FREMANTLE CONTENT

Featured Image: Claremont’s Joel Western celebrates with teammates | Source: (Retrieved from) Claremont Football Club via Facebook

Scouting Notes: 2020 SANFL – Round 13

ROUND 13 of the South Australian National Football League (SANFL) brings along with it another edition of our scouting notes, focusing on the top draft-relevant performers from around the competition this weekend. In this instalment, we again turn our attention to the prospects running around in the Under 18 competition, with a focus on State Academy based talentNational Combine invitees, and others who may push for selection along the line. A bunch of top-end juniors plied their trade in senior grades over the weekend, so they also get a look-in.

Please consider that each set of notes showcases the opinions of our scouts individually, and there are only so many players we can keep an eye on each week.

>> Power Rankings: September Edition

Norwood vs. South Adelaide

By: Michael Alvaro

Norwood:

#1 Cooper Murley

He may not have been at his absolute dominant best, but the bottom-ager still managed to impact proceedings with his searing pace and forward running. Murley built into the contest well, stationed at his typical midfield post as others rotated heavily around him. His break-neck acceleration and cleanliness came to the fore in tandem during the latter stages, as Murley gathered ground balls or received out of congestion, before freeing himself of opposition pressure with pure speed and delivering inside 50. He first found the goals in the second term after cooly converting a holding the ball free kick, but Murley’s highlight of the day came as he burned an opponent to win the ball over the back, before steadying and slotting a second major at full flight. There is no stopping him when he gets going, and the talented midfielder finished with 19 disposals, seven inside 50s, and two goals after a steady start.

#4 Henry Nelligan

Nelligan is a player who has no trouble in finding the ball, and that was exactly the case in this outing as he racked up an equal team-high 23 disposals for Norwood. The diminutive ball winner was one of the many Redlegs to rotate through midfield, providing a relevant two-way presence with numerous ground ball gets and a game-high eight tackles. He did well to chain his possessions and bring teammates into the game, while also working back into defence to help out – particularly when South was on top in the first term. Nelligan also has the ability to impress with weaving runs through traffic and outstanding use of his lateral vision, though much of his work came via scrubbed clearances and short-range passes to keep the play moving. A solid day out, nonetheless.

#11 Xavier Tranfa

One of the many prospects to return to SANFL action via the college football scene, Tranfa slotted into Norwood’s midfield well. The Rostrevor skipper also moved through the forwardline, but was arguably most impactful while operating the engine room. While Tranfa tended to bomb hurriedly out of congestion, he also had some nice passages where his agile step and quick, pumping bursts allowed him to exit the contest. The top-ager very nearly hit the scoreboard, as two final-term set shots only just failed to hit the target. He did provide a handy goal assist in the same term though, measuring a nice pass to honour William Warrick‘s lead inside 50. While others found more of the ball, Tranfa made the most of his 16 disposals with six clearances and eight inside 50s among them, as well as a couple of strong contested marks.

Others:

Another school football inclusion, Ethan Schwerdt notched 23 disposals as he slotted into the midfield fold. The Pembroke gun was clean and hard at the ball, also laying seven tackles in a solid outing. Samuel Duke was the other Redleg to have 23 touches, as he was made particularly busy in the early stages before settling Norwood down back. He contributed 10 marks, many of which were intercepts, and 10 rebound 50s. Finn Heard was another big performer for the victors, booting five goals and presenting beautifully up forward as a key position focal point. Half of his eight marks were contested. Rounding out, Michael Cavallaro continued his promising season with 19 touches and 11 marks, linking well between the arcs.

>> MORE NORWOOD CONTENT

South Adelaide:

#10 Brayden Cook

Cook is every bit the difference maker for South Adelaide, proving as much despite his five-goal effort being made in vein. While the draft bolter’s finishing has wavered at times among his wealth of opportunities, Cook was efficient as ever inside 50 on this occasion. He sparked the Panthers’ early onslaught with the opening goal of the game, burning an opponent before slotting the ball home. Another was added late in the same term, this time as he anticipated well after a long ball hit the deck. A classy dribble finish made for a third goal in term two, before Cook arrested Norwood’s momentum in the following period with two goals at the death, putting South back in front heading into the final break. Both majors showcased Cook’s incredible class on the ball, and an innate ability to know exactly how to move, to find space and the goals. Swinging him forward from the wing is South Adelaide’s wildcard, and it almost worked once again. Only 13 disposals this time out, but Cook only needs a few moments to make an impact.

#21 Matthew Roberts

It is as if he never left. Another to return to SANFL Under 18s action via the school football competition, Roberts immediately reminded onlookers of his class. Along with Brayden Cook, the bottom-ager was integral to South Adelaide’s blistering start, booting two outstanding goals in the first term. He was simply everywhere, tracking back to intercept in defence, extracting at the coalface, and eventually sneaking forward to bomb home those two majors. Roberts just has the happy knack of being able to find the ball in all parts, which is largely aided by his high-level work-rate. Add courage, the ability to lift a side on his shoulders, and neat use of the ball to those traits, and you have a first round prospect heading into next year’s draft. He copped some nagging opposition attention in the end, but still managed 31 disposals, six marks, six clearances, and two goals.

#33 Arlo Draper

Another bottom-age gun who has proven he is easily up to scratch, Draper continued his terrific form as a primary midfielder for the Panthers. He is already a good size, and uses every bit of his frame to stand up in tackles, most notably in the first term as he dished off to Brayden Cook while being pulled down on the attacking arc. While extracting has largely been his game, Draper also worked hard around the ground to gain an accumulative factor, but was much more suited to the cut and thrust of clearance work. He faded out of the game a touch, but still had a hand in numerous score involvements – including his own set shot which hit the post late in the day. Draper ended with 20 disposals, four clearances, and four inside 50s.

Others:

Max Clifton was another terrific part of the South Adelaide midfield, and attempted to lift when his side needed it. His ability to take the game on through the corridor and deliver forward via foot was again on show, as he managed eight inside 50s from 13 disposals. Jack Flett again showed good signs in defence, popping up for intercept marks and providing some dare on the rebound. He had 20 disposals and seven marks, while Harry Spacie took six marks from his 18 touches in defence. Dylan Brown‘s pressure was another strong point, as he laid six tackles in another valiant effort.

>> MORE SOUTH ADELAIDE CONTENT

North Adelaide vs. Sturt

By: Eli Duxson

North Adelaide:

#5 Leo Coates

The key forward had the Ned Grieve matchup all game and kept him accountable, kicking two goals and two behinds, and taking five marks. He scored the first goal of the game after being the recipient of a downfield free kick, and after starting his run up from the cricket pitches, he drilled the set shot and made the distance comfortably from 50 metres. Coates did not seem to be kicked to with long entries, so whether he was not in the right position or caught out with ill-directed kicks, that is certainly an area where he can stamp his authority more in games. When he pushed up the ground, he created contests at the very least and tried to follow up with pressure or blocks. He looked most impressive with slow forward entries as he was able to find space on Grieve and lead out and mark on several occasions. He kicked his second goal this way.

#20 Jayden Davison

The hard-running midfielder worked all game and continued to get to contest after contest. He finished with 27 disposals, one goal, and six clearances as he continues to put up solid performances. He lined up on Tom Powell at most stoppages but continued to hunt the ball himself. Davison had first hands on the ball at most stoppages and with good evasive skills, accurate handballs with either hand, and a relentless work ethic to put in repeat efforts, it was hard to stop his output. He was a little clumsy early over the ball either fumbling or going to ground, but once he got going he looked as clean as anyone. He spent most of the game in the midfield and continued to run hard both ways. His efforts were rewarded in the second quarter as he managed a goal with a quick gather and kick out of congestion. With more than 20 disposals and a goal in four of his previous five matches, Davison has proven himself to be a valuable member of this Roosters outfit.

#22 Lam Simon

Simon did not start the game the way he would have liked, giving away a free kick for high contact in front of goal, gifting Sturt their first goal. From there, it was strength to strength for the defender as he showed off his athleticism and ability to read the play to find his own ball. He clearly had a defence-first mindset though with some good one-on-one spoils, even courageously backing into a pack to fist it away. Once his job was done in defence, his acceleration and attack on the ball enabled him to burst through packs and provide some run-and-carry. His disposal was rushed at times under pressure, so he kicked a lot more than he handballed, but his disposal was neat more often than not. Simon finished with 16 disposals and six marks (three contested) in what was a good day for the North Adelaide defence.

#25 Blayne O’Loughlin

One of the more trusted ball users in the side, the defender ended up with 31 disposals, one goal, eight marks, and seven rebound 50s to help his side get the win they had. While some of his 26 kicks were chips sideways in defence, he also showed a willingness to attack the footy and lead his opponent to the ball, picking the ball up cleanly on the bounce on many occasions. His acceleration and cleanliness make him very damaging and when you factor in his ball use with that left boot, he becomes an exciting player to watch. When he runs off his opponent he manages to impact the contest with a spoil or mark or simply by creating a stoppage. When he does this, he does lose touch easily and although it did not cost him or his side, it is an easy way to give your opponent a freebie if it gets over your head. He capped off his game in the third quarter after receiving a 25-metre penalty to allow him to nail a set shot from 45 metres. While he does accumulate with short sideways kicks, his attack on the ball and ability to set up play from his defensive half is impressive and one to watch for opposition teams.

#37 Karl Finlay (League)

Finlay spent most of his day deep in defence and was the James Borlase matchup when he was playing forward. The key defender spoiled well and tackled strongly as he usually does, but it was his marking that stood out the most. He took two contested marks out of his six, with one of them being in a one-on-one contest with Borlase playing on the back shoulder. He read the flight of the ball well all game and looks to be growing in confidence. In the final quarter he managed to get knee in the back of a Sturt player and take a nice overhead mark. He set up well behind the ball to help the North Adelaide forward squeeze but decided to push forward on one occasion and try to impact the scoreboard. He gathered and wheeled on his left boot and had a shot from 40 metres, but could only manage a behind. Along with his six marks he had 14 disposals and efforts that would not have made the stat sheet.

#38 Dyson Hilder (League)

Hilder found himself on Borlase on a few occasions but with Finlay, he remained solid down back for the Roosters. Also still growing in confidence in his second consecutive game back in the League side, he got on the attack, involving himself in links from deep in defence to clear. His kicking was tidy and he was confident enough to go on either side of his body. Hilder ended up with 13 disposals and four rebound 50s as he looks to hold his spot in the senior side for finals.

Others:

North Adelaide enjoyed two solid victories but in the Under 18’s, James Willis stood out and it was not for his bright blonde hair, but his 23 disposals and two goals. He provided some exciting run while also doing some of the grunt work inside for the Roosters. Thomas Millar was also very serviceable down back being strong in the contest, while distributing the ball efficiently out of his defensive 50. He finished with 17 disposals, eight marks, and five rebound 50s.

>> MORE NORTH ADELAIDE CONTENT

Sturt:

#2 Tom Lewis (League)

The 20-year-old enjoyed one of his better games for the season as he found his way to 21 disposals to go with nine tackles and seven clearances. Shifting between the midfield and the forward line, Lewis was not afraid to enforce a physical presence around the contest. His tackle count is indicative of the pressure he applied and him doing most of his work on the inside. He earned multiple free kicks by being the first at the ball and was tidy with his left boot. A brilliant chase down tackle in the final quarter even though Sturt trailed exemplified his effort and capped off a good game for him despite the loss.

#9 Malachy Carruthers

The combine invitee spent much of the day at half-back and was kept busy with 21 disposals and eight marks. He was lively early as he ran out of defence and created width on forward movements for Sturt. He also looked to be poised with ball in hand, opting to handball instead of kicking it to a contest. His marking was impressive, taking one overhead running back with the flight, and another intercept mark in a pack. His disposal looked reliable and his dash and effort to continue Sturt’s surge forward was important. However, he opted to have a shot on goal from a tough position after working hard with repeat efforts, instead of going inboard. Although it was a tough day for his side, his athleticism and ability to read the play looked threatening.

#11 Will Spain

The inside midfielder continues to prove himself as a reliable contributor in the Sturt midfield, but today, he showed off some of his ability on the outside. He spent more time in the forward line and spread hard from some of the stoppages, instead of being the one constantly over the ball or laying tackle after tackle like usual. He had some nice runs through the middle of the ground, showing off his run-and-carry with his smooth movement. Spain finished with 29 disposals, five tackles, and five clearances and continued to remain consistent all game.

#17 Mani Liddy

Liddy did not have the output that we have come to expect from him, but 16 disposals and six clearances is still a serviceable effort. His strength was on display as usual and he did most of his work on the inside with 11 of his disposals being handballs. After a quiet second quarter, he looked much more active in the third which is a good indicator of his resilience and persistence to continue, despite it not coming as easy to him as it usually does.

#18 Tom Powell

One of Sturt’s most highly rated performers put in another big game to end with 35 disposals, 10 clearances, and seven inside 50s. His work rate and speed to burst from stoppages with the ball and create, as well as without the ball to get to a dangerous positions, continues to be his trademark. He puts in long-distance efforts so even if opposition teams think they get the better of him at a stoppage, he will just keep running. His handballs under pressure in-close are very tidy, and he demands respect from his opponents whenever he is around the ball. He often lines up beside or behind the ruckman to enable him to run to hit zones and whenever he did this during the game, a North Adelaide player was right next to him. When he was resting and another Sturt player was in the midfield, they were left alone – a good indicator of the respect that opposition coaches are showing to him. Another big performance from him which we have come to expect and with one game left in the season, we will see if the coaches decide to give him a League chance, or allow him some continuity as his Under 18 side moves into finals.

#29 James Borlase (League)

The key position Borlase returned to the senior side and showed glimpses of why people are so excited about him. The Crows Next Generation Academy prospect split his time between forward and back, although he has been touted as a defender during his time in the pathway programs. As a forward, he presented up the ground well and continued to create contests. His marking looked a little bit inconsistent and he seemed to struggle to find space on leads except for one occasion in the second quarter. After a beautiful delivery, he leant back on the set shot kick from around 40 metres and put it out on the full.

He moved back for the second half and did not get much of a chance to show off his defensive traits in one-on-one contests. He looked to be accountable and found himself on a few different opponents, both taller and shorter than him. He became more attacking in the final quarter; seeming to grow in confidence, clearing the ball, and looking to mark. He reads the flight of the ball well but looked a little tentative with his overhead marking at times. A miskick from a kick-out in the final quarter sent the ball straight back over his head for a goal. His first game back showed he was still a bit rusty, and perhaps he has some development left. There is still a lot to like about him with his versatility, size, and athleticism.

#34 Casey Voss (League)

Voss assumed his role at half-back and managed 21 disposals and five marks. Defensively he was very solid, showing courage on several occasions backing into packs to spoil, but it was his attacking play that was impressive. He is clean and strong over the ball much like his father, and his kicking ability was tidy. He found space very often around the stoppage and seems to want the footy. He had 17 kicks and four handballs but was often the player providing run and being on the end of handballs. After one of his higher disposal games for the season, Voss has been consistent for Sturt and will look to finish his season off strongly.

#46 Jack Henderson (League)

The 21-year-old midfielder has been impressive for Sturt since breaking through into the senior side and had another solid outing with 19 disposals and six inside 50s. One of those inside 50s was to Borlase in the first quarter with a beautiful 40-metre bullet pass which thumped into the forward’s chest. Spending some time all over the ground, Henderson looked best hanging off the contest as his ball use was elite, and his first touch ability aided that well. He showed good speed getting involved in attacking chains and put in repeat efforts to keep pushing the ball forward. If his right-foot kicking was not enough, he also set up a goal with his left, showing plenty of ability.

Others:

Other ball winners for Sturt included Bradley Jefferies (28 disposals, eight clearances) and Lachlan Thomas (24 disposals), while Morgan Ferres was the Double Blues’ major goal scorer kicking four majors. Grieve was down on his usual output, playing the defensive role on Coates and picking up just the nine disposals.

>> MORE STURT CONTENT

Central District vs. Glenelg

By: Tom Wyman

Central District:

#13 Austin McDonald

As has been the case all season, inside midfielder, McDonald was everywhere for the Bulldogs. McDonald’s smart and tireless running patterns allowed him to accumulate the ball en masse, particularly early in the game. The 16-year-old possesses football smarts well beyond his age and read the tap-work of ruckman Wyatt Ryan particularly well. Throughout the season, he has laid some excellent tackles and he did so once again at Prospect Oval, when a textbook tackle was rewarded with a holding-the-ball free-kick. Although lacking penetration at-times, his kicking was predominately effective, hitting up a number of targets on the exterior with his natural left-foot. He refused to give up on a contest and was rarely beaten in contested situations – a testament to his core strength and ball winning abilities. Arguably best-on-ground in the Bulldogs’ win, McDonald finished with a game-high 34 disposals and five marks.

#15 Finn Read

Read played arguably his best game for the season in the Bulldogs’ thrilling win. He booted the opening goal of the game within the first minute of play, then nailed a second against the flow of play late in the third quarter to arrest some of the Tigers; momentum. With the Bulldogs up by just one point late in the final term, Read’s goal at the 25-minute mark all but sealed the deal for Central District. Read was an aerial threat all day across half-forward, taking seven marks including a strong contested grab. His ball use inside 50 was also pivotal in the Bulldogs’ win. He finished the contest with 24 disposals and six inside 50s.

#16 Brodie Lake

The Northern Territory native played an important hand in the win, combining well with Austin McDonald, Wyatt Ryan and Luigi Mondello through the midfield. Lake, who has also spent some time in the Reserves since joining the Bulldogs, attacked the ball with ferocity and looked to use his aerial leap and burst of speed to good advantage when thrown into attack by the Central District coaching staff. Similar to McDonald, Lake’s clearance work was terrific, particularly at centre bounces where he gathered, accelerated away from his direct opponent and thrust the Dogs into attack. Lake finished with 21 disposals, three marks, four tackles, eight clearances and six inside 50s.

#22 Luigi Mondello 

Mondello provided some class through the midfield, to compliment the hard, contested ball-winning of McDonald and Lake. Mondello had some eye-catching moments throughout the contest, with his evasiveness at stoppages, smooth movement through traffic and creative handballing standing out. However the highlight of his game was a fantastic snap goal around the corner, shortly after the half-time break. Although he fumbled on a couple of occasions, his evasiveness and agility were impressive. Mondello finished the game with 20 disposals, four marks, three tackles and two inside 50s.

#39 Wyatt Ryan

The big ruckman once again provided a real presence for his side, in the air and also at ground level. He marked almost everything that entered his air space, including several intercepts. The Bulldogs often looked for him as the target down the line and he hardly let them down, clunking five contested marks and ten grabs in total. However his competitiveness and brute strength were also on display at ground level, where he was able to win the contested ball and send it forward on several occasions. His kicking was up and down, but he hit several targets which ruckman of his age could be hesitant to attempt. He had a good battle with Glenelg’s Calvin Perks and William Wiseman in the ruck and managed to win 28 hit-outs. Ryan’s work rate was exceptional, accumulating 31 disposals all over the ground and sending the ball inside 50 on nine occasions. Clearly one of the Under 18 competition’s best ruckman this season, Ryan was once again terrific for the Bulldogs.

Others:

Cody Gilchrist provided a target up forward, taking several strong marks in attack. He booted three goals from 13 disposals and seven marks. Michael De Jonge hit the scoreboard with two majors to go with 19 touches, four marks, four tackles and three clearances. Jacob Fiebiger (11 disposals and four marks) and Luca Whitelum (16 disposals, six marks, four tackles, four inside 50s and four rebound 50s) both performed well down back under pressure for Central District.

>> MORE CENTRAL DISTRICT CONTENT

Glenelg:

#1 Harry Tunkin

Tunkin was among Glenelg’s most consistent performers despite the frustrating result. In the midfield, he spent time going head-to-head with Austin McDonald, but it was his work forward of centre where he looked most damaging. He slotted a classy goal from 40 metres in the dying minutes of the first term and showed great goal nous and football smarts to follow it up with a goal from a quick hack forward. Despite his smaller size, the Prince Alfred College student applied plenty of pressure, competed well, and finished the day with 22 disposals, six marks, a game-high seven tackles, three clearances and four inside 50s.

#12 Xavier Robins

The Bays were certainly glad to have Robins back from school football duties. He slotted straight into the backline and provided some class and rebound from defence. He read the play well and looked to take the game on with his pace and run-and-carry whenever possible. He displayed nice vision to spot up Harry Tunkin in some space on the grandstand side of Prospect Oval twice within a couple of minutes in the third term and found the ball with ease for the entire game. At stoppages in the defensive 50, Robins had a high impact, winning five clearances. Trusted with the kick-in duties, he used the ball well over a variety of distances and controlled much of the play for the Bays in defence, finishing with 30 disposals, seven marks, four tackles and ten rebound-50s.

#19 Jayden Davis

The bottom-aged Jayden Davis was terrific for Glenelg, particularly in the third term when it was all one-way traffic in favour of the yellow and black. Early on in the game, he found Riley Holder with a beautiful kick inside 50 which led to Harry McInnes’ second goal. He displayed great courage to mark whilst running back with the flight and booted his first goal at the ten minute mark of the third term to trigger a couple of Tigers goals. During the third quarter, his link-up play and delivery inside 50 was outstanding, hitting target-after-target with precision. After setting-up several Bays majors, he booted his second after getting out the back of a marking contest to continue Glenelg’s surge. Davis could have had a third for the term if his long range effort wasn’t touched on the goalline. He finished another strong showing with 19 disposals and ten marks (including three contested).

#21 Riley Holder

The return of centre-half-forward Holder helped straighten the Tigers up and provided a presence around the ground. His hands overhead were a real feature, even managing to outmark Wyatt Ryan in attack before kicking truly. He combined well with fellow key forward Harry McInnes, with Holder getting up the ground and McInnes staying closer to goal. His foot skills, over both long and short distances, were effective and his accuracy in front of goal ensured his capitalised on his work rate. He was thrust into the middle for a short stint to provide a big-bodied presence around the ball but was at his best on the lead. The Glenelg skipper finished with game with 24 touches, 11 marks (including a game-high six contested), three tackles, a couple of clearances and five inside 50s, to further his case as one of South Australia’s premiere centre half-forwards.

Others:

Seven Tigers found in-excess of 20 disposals, including Oscar Clark, who ran well both ways and provided an option on the outside. He finished with 27 disposals, three inside 50s and three rebound 50s. Henry McAuliffe battled hard in the midfield and laid a couple of strong tackles. He won 27 touches and used the ball well. Fresh off an Intercol medal for his performance down back against Rostrevor, Cooper Beecken was valiant in the backline, concluding with 17 disposals. The aforementioned Harry McInnes booted three goals and competed well in the air to take six marks. William Watts (25 disposals, nine marks and a goal) and Hunter Window (21 disposals and six marks) were also among Glenelg’s best performers.

>> MORE GLENELG CONTENT

WWT Eagles vs. West Adelaide

By: Peter Williams

WWT:

#4 James Tsitas (League)

The former Williamstown star made his presence felt in this game with a mammoth 39 disposals in a clear best on ground performance. While James Rowe and Sam Lowson kicked nine between them, it was the clearance work and class of Tsitas that shone the brightest. In a time where clubs might look to mature-age ready-to-go midfielders, Tsitas showed exactly what he is capable of with a huge performance on-ball. His goal late in the game off the outside of the boot was all class, and he just managed to find so much space around the ground.

Tsitas had a lazy 39 disposals, seven marks, 10 tackles, 10 clearances, five inside 50s, two rebounds and a goal.

#5 Sam Lowson (League)

The former Coburg forward had a quiet first half before coming alive with four second half goals to blow the game right open. He was clever inside 50, kicking one right before the three-quarter time siren, and continually found space and made opportunities out of nothing. He nailed a set shot and missed another, but Lowson was a clear standout in front of goal once Rowe moved into the midfield, and he remained a real danger at ground level and one to watch ahead of the SANFL finals series.

Lowson had 13 disposals, two marks, two inside 50s and four goals on the night.

#16 James Rowe (League)

If you are an aspiring small forward, then highlights of Rowe should be what clubs use to show exactly how you play the role. Every time he went near it he looked dangerous, and he finds space with ease and has some serious wheels when he takes off. But it is more about his anticipation and game sense inside 50 that makes him so damaging. It was obvious the Eagles had set plays in the forward half where teammates would help block for him and he would cruise on through and kick a goal off the stoppage. A couple of times he did it and looked far too easy, and had another great running goal close to the pocket reacting quicker than everyone else. With a couple of set shot goals – and a couple of misses – Rowe was far too dominant for whoever came his way. Deserves a chance at the next level because if you are good enough, you are big enough.

Rowe finished with a massive 5.2 from 19 disposals, four marks, four clearances and two inside 50s.

#19 Zachary Phillips

His ruck work was superb and follow-up work also strong, as Phillips played a solid game across the four quarters. He showed his ability to clunk marks in the air, and provide a target around the ground, as well as showing smarts to tap the ball to a teammate on the wing rather than take possession and be tacked, then receiving the ball back and handballing off again. He had a couple of flying shots on goal that both missed wide, but it was due to his hard running to get to half-forward from initial centre clearances that gave him those chances on goal. He showed quick hands to a teammate when in congestion and was happy to drop back to help play a kick and a half behind play when his side was attacking.

Phillips finished with 20 disposals, nine marks (two contested), 22 hitouts, three clearances and four inside 50s.

#25 Henry Smith

Smith played an almost-game where he continually got to the right positions and worked his opponent under the ball, but could not quite hold the grabs. When battling one-on-one Smith was solid, but when facing a couple of opponents, it was body contact from behind that often caused him to spill the mark. He still worked hard and showed great decision making in the third term to set up a great goal to Cormack O’Reilly with a lovely long kick to the other side of the ground for his teammate to run in and kick a major. He kicked a goal of his own on the run when he saw an open goalsquare and popped it home.

Smith had the 13 touches, three marks (two contested) six hitouts, three inside 50s and one goal to his name.

#28 Nick Mitzithras

Caught the eye midway through the game with his run out of defence and penetrating kick. He had a couple of scrubber kicks but they seemed to still work out, and he was strong in the air as well. One-on-one, Mitzithras held his own, marking in the defensive goalsquare six minutes into the third term, and then early in the fourth, held off an opponent and used momentum to push off him, win the loose ball in front and kick long to the wing. His decision making and disposal generally was pretty good and he was not afraid to take the game on, rebounding on a number of occasions.

Mitzithras had 21 disposals, four marks (one contested) and seven rebounds for the match.

#29 Jay Watson

Always looking lively in the forward half, Watson could have had a massive day out, but just finished with the two goals from six scoring shots. His first goal came from a set shot midway through the second term, and he then set up a teammate not long after with a lovely pinpoint pass inside 50. He continued to try hard throughout the game, and had a set shot that went close to the line but just missed to the right, before kicking truly with a clever snap off the left playing on from a mark close to the boundary. Having a couple of long-range set shots in the final term, one missed to the right and another hit the post, but nonetheless, Watson was always active inside 50.

Watson finished with 2.4 from 21 disposals, five marks (one contested) and four inside 50s.

#31 Jase Burgoyne

The prominent ball winner on the ground, Burgoyne showed his dual-sidedness with an ability to hit targets off his left when required, even though he was a predominant right-footer. Most of his kicks during the match were short, sharp passes without penetration, but with high efficiency. Burgoyne just makes the right decisions and did not go for anything that was unnecessarily risky, but he did open up the game with some neat kicks inboard. His work around the clearances was superb and he was the clear dominant midfielder on the ground with his effectiveness. He set up a number of scoring opportunities with his ball use and his cleanliness both in the air and ground level was terrific. He had a set shot himself from 40 metres, eight minutes into the final term, and showed he possesses a long kick, hitting the post midway up and proving unlucky not to kick the goal.

Burgoyne ended the match with a game-high 35 disposals, seven marks, nine clearances, two inside 50s, four rebounds and three tackles.

#34 Lachlan Jones (League)

The Port Adelaide Next-Generation Academy member might have finished with the least touches on his team (seven) but he was far from ineffective. His work rate was high and a lot of the time his running went unrewarded. He would spread from half-back to the wing and kept the ball moving in transition. His ability to cover ground from deep in defence to half-forward was a credit to his running, and he also laid a couple of good tackles in the game. The fact that most of his touches were either rebounds or inside 50s told a tale of his effectiveness in moving the ball.

Jones ended with seven disposals, one marks, two tackles, three inside 50s and three rebounds.

#47 Ben Jungfer (League)

The over-age talented midfielder spent time across the ground, winning the ball at half-forward, along the wing, and even at half-forward. He has always been known for his tackling pressure, and he showed it by laying a massive tackle on an opponent in the final term at half-back, earning the plaudits of his teammates. One aspect about Jungfer’s game that really stood out was his composure and ability not to be overawed. The majority of his touches were quick handballs, but he managed to execute generally well and even had a flying shot on goal from 50m which narrowly missed.

For a debut, Jungfer was mighty impressive with 19 disposals, three marks, three clearances, two inside 50s and five tackles.

#51 Lachlan McNeil (League)

The over-age talent was willing to take the game on and seriously impressed throughout. He can make the odd mistake, but his metres gained – including a run down the middle with a couple of bounces – more than makes up for it with his determination to break the lines. He is a high-impact player in that regard and he did well off half-back and pushing through the middle throughout the four quarters.

McNeil finished 14 disposals, one mark, three inside 50s, two tackles, two clearances and two rebounds.

Others:

Brayden Calvett was the biggest standout of those not mentioned above, amassing nine inside 50s and six marks from 27 disposals, also booting a goal. O’Reilly (25 touches, seven marks, eight inside 50s and a goal), Max Litster (23 disposals, six marks and five inside 50s) and Zeke Scott (21 disposals, three inside 50s and a goal) were the others to catch the eye.

>> MORE WWT EAGLES CONTENT

West Adelaide:

#4 Cade Kennedy

The bottom-age midfielder was a clear standout for the Bloods, and one of the four-quarter performers. He attacks the ball hard and tracks it well, always having eyes for the footy. There is not much of him, but he is always running hard and often looking to present in defensive 50 from the kick-out and then quickly give-and-go with teammates down the field. He had a memorable moment late in the third term with a huge tackle on Henry Smith to trap the bigman’s arm and win a free. He opened the fourth quarter with a good centre clearance, and whilst he did sell a teammate into trouble in the final term with an extra handball when it should have probably been a kick, Kennedy could hold his head high in that performance in what was a 90-point defeat.

Kennedy ended the game with 30 disposals, 10 marks, seven tackles, five clearances, two inside 50s and four rebounds.

#49 Lachlan Squire (League)

Had a tough day at the office having to spend time on competition danger man, James Rowe early. He was good one-on-one, but Rowe was quick at ground level, and Squire was unlucky to give away a free kick close to the boundary line for keeping him in check at one stage. While Rowe certainly took the chocolates in their duel – and it was not just him – Squire showed what he is capable of doing with some lovely long kicks out of defence, and a fierce tackle on Rowe to win a free kick. His defensive pressure and strength standing up in tackles was a feature, having some time in the midfield but predominantly stationed back on the last line and having the kick-out duties.

#59 Hamish Ellem (League)

It was a tough day for the big man who continually presented for the Bloods, having more of an influence late in the game when his marks were starting to stick. He had a few chances going up for grabs in the first two quarters but could not quite bring them down, but once he gained confidence he looked good. He set up a goal to a teammate in the final term, whilst kicking a goal himself in the sixth minute after some good work inside 50. Ellem was not able to have too much time and space when in possession, which is why he ended up with a predominantly handball-focused game, but used his body well in close.

Others:

Eduard Van den berg tried hard for the Bloods’ Under 18s, amassing 31 disposals, six marks, five tackles and nine rebounds, playing in a tough position on the last line. He repelled time and time again for the Bloods, but could not have too much salvation with the relentlessness of the Eagles. Ben Burbridge (23 disposals, six inside 50s and five tackles) was good, whilst Edward Faulkner (20 disposals, five marks, four tackles and four inside 50s) had a huge run-down tackle in the last term which caught the eye. Zac Venning (15 disposals, four marks and three rebounds) also tried hard, as did Kane Sherlock (18 disposals, eight rebounds and six marks).

>> MORE WEST ADELAIDE CONTENT

Featured Image: Sturt’s Morgan Ferres flies for a mark | Credit: Hannah Howard/SANFL

AFL Draft Watch: Henry Smith (WWT Eagles/South Australia)

IN the midst of football’s long-awaited return, Draft Central takes a look at some of this year’s brightest names who have already represented their state in some capacity leading into 2020, or are bolting into draft contention. While plenty has changed between now and then, we will provide a bit of an insight into players, how they performed at pre-season testing, and some of our scouting notes on them from last year.

Next under the microscope in our AFL Draft watch is Woodville-West Torrens (WWT) prospect Henry Smith, a raw tall with plenty of upside. Measuring up at 202cm, Smith is not only able to impact with his aerial marking, but also provides terrific follow-up efforts at the fall of the ball. Despite missing the first three games of this year’s SANFL Under 18s season, the 18-year-old ruck/forward impressed enough across nine outings since to earn his spot on the National Combine invitee list. Should he fill out and sharpen his conversion, Smith looms as a key position option who could prove difficult to stop in full flight.

PLAYER PAGE:

Henry Smith
WWT Eagles/South Australia

DOB: September 24, 2002

Height: 202cm
Weight: 82kg

Position: Key Position Forward/Ruck

Strengths: Contested marking, athleticism, follow-up/ground level efforts, upside
Improvements: Raw, finishing consistency

2020 SANFL U18s averages: 9 games | 13.1 disposals | 4.2 marks (2.2 contested) | 3.8 tackles | 7.0 hitouts | 1.2 clearances | 1.9 inside 50s | 0.9 goals (8) | 1.2 behinds (11)

PRESEASON TESTING RESULTS:

N/A.

>> Full Testing Results:
Jumps
20m Sprint
Agility
Yo-yo

2019/20 SCOUTING NOTES:

2020 SANFL Under 18s Round 11 vs. North Adelaide

By: Michael Alvaro

Another of Woodville-West Torrens’ 200cm prospects, Smith rotated between the forwardline and ruck to good effect. He showed some of the upside which earned him a national combine invite, following up well at stoppages while also faring well aerially as expected. Smith was another to use his height to advantage, clunking some big pack marks both around the ground and inside forward 50 against multiple opponents. Remarkably, all five of his marks were contested. While perhaps more of a lead-up forward prospect, Smith’s ruck craft was reasonably sound as he finished the game with 15 disposals, 15 hitouts, and fourth-term a goal.

2020 SANFL Under 18s Round 10 vs. Norwood

By: Tom Wyman

The AFL Academy member produced arguably his best performance of the season to-date, dominating the airways up forward and providing a presence in the ruck in relief of teammate Zac Phillips. As usual, Smith was the Eagles’ number one target in attack. They looked to centre the ball for him inside 50, allowing him to run and jump at the ball and use his contested marking strength to advantage. A prime example of this came in the just minutes into the clash, when Smith took a strong grab then converted the resultant set-shot from close range.

However, aside from his strong aerial presence, Smith’s cleanliness at ground level, quick and effective distribution by hand, and willingness to crack in and tackle hard was impressive. He spent more time in the ruck against the Redlegs than in previous weeks and fought well against Nathan Hearing, combining particularly well with teammate Harrison Dawkins at stoppages. The key forward finished with 15 disposals, two goals, five marks (two contested), nine tackles, ten hit-outs and four inside 50s.

2020 SANFL Under 18s Round 5 vs. Glenelg

By: Michael Alvaro

Again starting as the Eagles’ primary target up forward, Smith showed nice glimpses of his best form with strong marks, taking the ball at its highest point. He looked ominous on the lead at times and is difficult to defend at the Under 18 level on account of his height and reach on the lead. With good delivery, he was granted goalkicking opportunities but failed to make the most of his set shots. By the fourth quarter, his confidence may have been a little shot as he opted to kick inboard from 20-metres out, which got him a goal assist nonetheless.

2020 SANFL Under 18s Round 4 vs. North Adelaide

By: Michael Alvaro

The second of WWT’s bigmen, Smith played as a permanent forward and looked the most likely aerial target afield. He started strongly with a nice contested mark in between two opponents, but went on to miss a couple of set shot opportunities in the first term. What was most impressive about Smith, contested marking aside, was his ability to impact the play after aerial contests, with solid tackling efforts and touches at ground level adding a handy dimension to his game. His return obviously did a lot for the Eagles side, despite only booting three behinds from his 10 disposals and five marks (three contested).

2019 Under 17 Futures All-Stars

By: Ed Pascoe

The other big Henry to ruck for Team Dal Santo – Smith actually showed more up forward with a strong contested mark and set shot goal in the first quarter. The Woodville-West Torrens prospect, as good as he looked overhead, also had a great pickup in the middle of the ground which was excellent for a 200-plus cm player and if he could improve his aggression in general he could prove to be a hard player to stop at the next level.

Featured Image: Henry Smith (centre) with Zac Dumesny and Luke Edwards after the 2019 Under 17s All-Star clash | Source: SANFL

>> 2020 AFL National Draft Combine List
>> 2020 South Australia U18s Squad Prediction

>> August 2020 Power Rankings
>> July 2020 Power Rankings
>> September 2020 Power Rankings

>> CATCH UP ON OUR DRAFT WATCH SERIES

Allies:
Tahj Abberley
Charlie Byrne
Jackson Callow
Blake Coleman
Braeden Campbell
Alex Davies
Oliver Davis
Errol Gulden
Joel Jeffrey
Patrick Walker

South Australia:
Kaine Baldwin
Bailey Chamberlain
Brayden Cook
Zac Dumesny
Corey Durdin
Luke Edwards
Lachlan Jones
Tariek Newchurch
Caleb Poulter
Tom Powell
Taj Schofield
Riley Thilthorpe

Vic Country:
Sam Berry
Tanner Bruhn
Jack Ginnivan
Oliver Henry
Elijah Hollands
Zach Reid
Nick Stevens
Jamarra Ugle-Hagan

Vic Metro:
Jake Bowey
Jackson Cardillo
Nikolas Cox
Connor Downie
Eddie Ford
Bailey Laurie
Finlay Macrae
Reef McInnes
Archie Perkins
Will Phillips

Western Australia:
Jack Carroll
Heath Chapman
Denver Grainger-Barras
Logan McDonald
Nathan O’Driscoll
Zane Trew
Brandon Walker
Joel Western
Isiah Winder

Stephenson stars in 2017 NAB AFL Under 18 All Stars game

JAIDYN Stephenson has pushed his claims as a possible top five pick in November’s NAB AFL Draft by having a best-on-ground display in the 2017 NAB AFL Under 18 All Stars game at the MCG on Saturday.

In the curtain-raiser to the Grand Final, the Vic Metro wingman booted four goals from his 22 disposals, helping Team Harvey to a 55-point win over Team Enright.

Stephenson capped off his strong second half of the season, which has seen the Eastern Ranges product push up into the midfield. Stephenson also clunked eight marks, laid five tackles and had four inside 50s.

In the second year of the AFLs annual showcase, the contest pitted the best 50 2017 draft eligible prospects against each other, split into two sides named after former Geelong great Corey Enright (Team Enright) and North Melbourne champion Brent Harvey (Team Harvey).

Team Harvey midfielder Lochie O’Brien (24 disposals and a goal) had his best game for the season on the wing, while possible No.1 pick Luke Davies-Uniacke (23 disposals, six marks and four inside 50s) also put in a solid effort in the midfield.

Dandenong Stingrays midfielder Aiden Bonar was another to push his claims and used his strong frame in the contest to win the football.

Bonar impressed with 20 disposals (11 contested) and five clearances, and may be a contender as a top-10 selection after having had two surgeries on his ACL over the last two years.

Vic Metro forward Hayden McLean booted three last quarter goals, to finish with four goals from his 12 disposals and six marks.

Fresh from the Geelong Falcons’ TAC Cup premiership, Team Enright’s James Worpel was their best with 21 disposals (13 contested) and seven clearances.

Midfielders Patrick Naish (21 disposals) and Brayden Ainsworth (20 disposals, seven clearances and five tackles) were two others who performed well for the losing side.

Northern Knights pair Nick Coffield (15 disposals at 86 per cent and five rebound 50s) and Jack Petruccelle (11 disposals) both rebounded the ball with speed.

West Australian 2017 Larke Medalist Oscar Allen clunked seven marks (four contested), finishing with 2.3 from his 18 disposals.

The National Combine kicks off tomorrow at Etihad Stadium and will run until the 6th of October.

 

TEAM ENRIGHT      3.2      4.5      5.7          8.7 (55)
TEAM HARVEY        2.3      7.3      11.6    17.8 (110)

GOALS
TEAM ENRIGHT: Allen 2, Moore, Brayshaw, Fogarty, Hayes, Balta, Petruccelle
TEAM HARVEY: McLean 4, Stephenson 4, Starcevich, O’Brien, Bonar, Davies-Uniacke, Daniels, Crossley, Ross, Richards, Miller

Stars to shine bright at the National AFL Draft Combine

ben-jarman

FOR the draft crop of 2016, the National AFL Draft Combine is the first sign that their AFL dreams are a step closer to fruition. An invitation to the AFL Draft Combine means that at least five AFL clubs have expressed interest in the player. The AFL Draft Combine is a way for clubs to determine the players’ physical strengths as well as getting one-on-one time through combine interviews.

Draftees take on each other in a series of tests that challenge their speed, endurance, reflexes and skills to determine their strengths and weaknesses. Combine results are taken into account by clubs when deciding between players and whether they believe they can take the next step into the AFL. A total of 81 players have been invited to the 2016 AFL Draft Combine.

Matt Balmer takes a look at who might be the standouts in the testing which runs from Friday to Sunday.


Thursday:

Players will begin to arrive at Etihad Stadium before a welcome will be held for all 81 players in attendence. Not all players will be able to test due to injuries, but they will sit in on interviews and medicals with clubs early in the combine.

Thursday also sees heights and weight taken, along with all the body sizing and measurements such as skin folds and tricept sizes. My spies have told me Ollie Florent will be a likely winner for the biggest hands at the combine.

The media will also be in attendance on Thursday afternoon with Kevin Sheehan speaking alongside Jonty Scharenberg, Jy Simpkin and Sam Powell-Pepper.

Friday:

More medicals and interviews for players when they arrive for another day. Friday night from 7pm-9.30pm will be the hand balling, kicking and goal kicking tests.

The Matthew Lloyd clean hands/handpassing test measures how well a player collects the football and is able to dispose of it using a handball. There are three targets set up on both the left and right side at distances of 6m, 8m and 10m. An official will roll out or throw a ball at the player and instruct them where to handball the ball to. This is done six times and a score from 1-5 is allocated to each handball depending on how good it is.

Who could win? Hugh McCluggage‘s hands in stoppages are outstanding, whilst Andrew McGrath has the highest TAC Cup handball efficiency with 93 per cent of his handballs hitting the target.

The Brad Johnson goal kicking test will measure a players accuracy kicking for goal. Four kicking points are designated with players taking five kicks in total; two set shots (35m out in either pocket), two snaps (20m out, one left foot and one right foot) and one kick on the run (40m out directly in front). The player has 70 seconds to complete the test. A score is then worked out from the amount of goals and behinds a player kicks.

Who could win? Vic Country forward Josh Battle has a superb kick on him from short or long range distances in front of goal. Again, Hugh McCluggage has shown he can push forward and hit the scoreboard throughout 2016.

The Nathan Buckley kicking test measures players kicking efficiency over six kicks. Six targets (three on each side) are set out at distances of 20m, 30m and 40m. An official will call out a target at random to the kick, who will then to proceed to hit the target. Each kick is given a score from one to five, with five being a perfect kick.

Who could win? West Australian Josh Rotham is one of the best kicks in the draft pool, his teammate tall ruckman Tim English is another who uses the ball well. Harry Morrison, Sam Petrevski-Seton, Alex Villis and Harry Perryman are others that should perform well in this test.

Saturday:

The biggest day of the carnival will see sprints, agility, jumps and the beep test held on the purpose built floor on Etihad.

Sprints will be held in the morning , whilst the afternoon will conclude with the beep test.

Who could win in the sprints? Exciting WA midfielder Shai Bolton will test extremely well in both the 20m sprint and the agility test. Back in 2014, Bolton ran a sub 3s 20m sprint and under 8s for the agility test, considered elite.

Brandan Parfitt and Cedric Cox are among others who has shown off their speed at times this season while Jordan Gallucci should perform well in the agility test. Vic Country teammates Ben Ainsworth (8.00 seconds) and Jarrod Berry (7.80 seconds) were superb in TAC Cup preseason testing, while Stingrays defender Bailey Morrish was just behind Berry running 7.81 seconds. Queenslander Josh Williams showed a remarkable dash of speed in a division two National Under 18s Championships game earlier in the season.

Murray Bushrangers tall Esava Ratugolea is another who tested well in the past (2.92s) as has South Australian excitement machine Kym Lebois.

The vertical leap test is always an interesting test with vertical jump and running vertical jump (left and right foot) measured.

Who could win in the jumps? South Australian tall utility Brennan Cox was superb in the preseason testing in the SANFL, recording over 90cm off either foot in the running vertical jump. Ruckman Tim English, Esava Ratugolea and Tony Olango could test well above their counterparts, but it was Stingrays defender Bailey Morrish who beat all comers in the TAC Cup preseason testing with a vertical leap of 81cm.

The shuttle run/beep test or multistage fitness test depending on where you’re from is another that is closely watched by clubs. Most are looking for kids to push out one last level on the test, rather than take the easy option and drop out early. Sometimes the dedication and commitment from players can lead to them ‘spewing’ up their lunch- but an effect that some clubs might put down as a big tick in their notebook.

Who could win in the beep test? Tim Taranto will be an early front runner, having run a 15.9 in the preseason. His Sandringham Dragons team mate Ollie Florent is another who might perform well. If Jack Graham tests, he could be South Australia’s best.

Sunday:

The final day of the combine will see the 3km time trial run in groups of 10-15. The 3km time trial is one of the most strutinised tests, players pushing themselves to the limit deserve a pat on the back- while those that cruse through without little effect might come under the eyes of recruiters when they pour over all their data.

The 3km time trial has gotten faster every season, with the record being broken for three years running.

Who could win the 3km time trial? Possible number one draft pick Andrew McGrath should run well, but will his heavy work load over the last few months affect him? Again Tim Taranto will be another who could perform well.


Invites:

Small Defenders/Midfielders/Forwards

Ben Ainsworth- Vic Country
Liam Baker- Western Australia
Shai Bolton- Western Australia
Callum Brown- Vic Metro
Cedric Cox- Vic Country
Joshua Daicos- Vic Metro
Zac Fisher- Western Australia
Ben Jarman- South Australia
Kym Lebois- South Australia
Andrew McGrath- Vic Metro
Brandan Parfitt- Northern Territory
Tyson Stengle- South Australia

Medium Defenders 

Jarrod Berry- Vic Country
Isaac Cumming- NSW/ACT
Taylin Duman- Vic Metro
Ben Long- NT
Bailey Morrish- Vic Country
Harry Morrison- Vic Country
Harry Perryman- NSW/ACT
Sam Walker- South Australia
Tom Williamson- Vic Country
Alex Witherden- Vic Country
Alex Villis- South Australia

Tall Defenders

Brennan Cox- South Australia
Ryan Garthwaite- NSW/ACT
Elliot Himmelberg- Queensland
Griffin Logue- Western Australia
Harrison Macreadie- NSW/ACT
Jack Maibaum- Vic Metro
Sam McLarty- Vic Metro
Jordan Ridley- Vic Metro
Joshua Rotham- Western Australia
Jack Scrimshaw- Vic Metro
Declan Watson- Queensland

Medium Midfielders

Jacob Allison- Queensland
Joseph Atley- Vic Country
Hamish Brayshaw- Vic Metro
Will Brodie- Vic Country
Jack Bowes- Queensland
Dylan Clarke- Vic Metro
Willem Drew- Vic Country
Judah Dundon- Vic Metro
Jordan Gallucci- Vic Metro
Jack Graham- South Australia
Matt Guelfi- Western Australia
Oscar Junker- Vic Metro
Hugh McCluggage- Vic Country
Kobe Mutch- NSW/ACT
Sam Petrevski-Seton- Western Australia
Myles Poholke- Vic Country
Sam Powell-Pepper- Western Australia
Luke Ryan- VFL
Jonty Scharenberg- South Australia
Will Setterfield- NSW/ACT
Daniel Venables- Vic Metro
Josh Williams- Queensland

Medium Forwards

Joshua Begley- Vic Metro
Benjamin Davis- NSW/ACT
Sam Fisher- NSW/ACT
Oliver Florent- Vic Metro
Will Hayward- South Australia
Mitchell Hinge- South Australia
Patrick Lipinski- Vic Metro
Quinton Narkle- Western Australia
Mark O’Connor- International
Brad Scheer- Queensland
Jy Simpkin- Vic Country
Tim Taranto- Vic Metro
Cameron Zurhaar- Western Australia

Tall Forwards/Rucks

Josh Battle- Vic Country
Sean Darcy- Vic Country
Timothy English- Western Australia
Jack Henry- Vic Country
Patrick Kerr- Vic Metro
Max Lynch- NSW/ACT
Todd Marshall- NSW/ACT
Mitchell McCarthy- Vic Country
Tony Olango- NT
Esava Ratugolea- Vic Country
Zachary Sproule- NSW/ACT
Jake Waterman- Western Australia

By the states:

International (1):
NSW/ACT (11):
Northern Territory (3):
Queensland (6):
South Australia (10):
Vic Country (18):
VFL (1):
Vic Metro (19):
Western Australia (12):

Six goal haul a Long time coming

Ben Long

AFTER being overlooked in the 2015 AFL Draft, Ben Long has remained steadfast in his approach to being watched once again in 2016.

The ‘over-ager’ boards at Melbourne Grammar and was one of their better players in what as a disappointing season in their APS school football competition.

Melbourne Grammar seem destined to have a handful of prospects join the AFL over the next few years with Dylan Clarke (2016), Jack Maibaum (2016), Charlie Spargo (2017) and Tyrone Hayes (2017) among the few likely to be drafted.

Standing at 183cm, Long is extremely versatile and able to play at both ends of the ground. His attack on the ball is superb and some of his flashes in and out of the contest catch the eye of those who have seen him play.

Early this season Long played for Northern Territory in the division two National Under 18 Championships, averaging 20 disposals, with his good form seeing him rewarded by being selected in the Allies squad for the division one carnival.

By the numbers, Long’s division one carnival was underwhelming but his job on Vic Country’s Ben Ainsworth in the final game of the carnival was outstanding – keeping the likely top 10 draftee to five disposals and a solitary goal at Simonds Stadium.

Long then gained an opportunity playing as 23rd man in the Footscray VFL team in August.

With seven disposals and four tackles on debut for Footscray, the Dogs kept him in for the following game where he bobbed up and nabbed three goals (including the opening goal of the day.

Long has been the surprise packet for Footscray this year. Playing just his sixth VFL game for the season, Long announced himself as a potential draftee with six goals against Collingwood VFL in the Dogs’ win on Saturday afternoon.

The impressive display from the 19-year-old saw him boot five second half goals, to lead Footscray to a 119-point win and catapult them into Sunday’s VFL Grand Final.

Finishing with 17 disposals (nine contested), six marks and six goals proved himself a worthy invitation to this years National Draft Combine which is to be held in October.

80 PLAYERS INVITED TO THE 2016 AFL DRAFT COMBINE