Tag: mitch o’neill

2019 AFL Draft club review: West Coast Eagles

A PREMIERSHIP 12 months ago, another finals series and a huge inclusion over the off-season with Tim Kelly crossing from Geelong, West Coast was always going to be a quiet achiever in the AFL Draft period. The Eagles picked up two players – both West Australian as predicted by Draft Central prior to the draft – as well as a second Claremont player in the Rookie Draft, and a massive slider who could be the steal of the draft. West Coast also redrafted a couple of their delistees to put them back on the rookie list.

WEST COAST:

National Draft:
49. Callum Jamieson (Claremont/Western Australia) | 199cm | 84kg | Ruck/Forward
58. Ben Johnson (West Perth/Western Australia) | 178cm | 68kg | Small Defender

Rookie Draft:
11. Anthony Treacy (Claremont/Western Australia) | 182cm | 69kg | Medium Forward
25. Mitch O’Neill (Tasmania/Allies) | 176cm | 72kg | Balanced Midfielder
33. Brendon Ah Chee (West Coast Eagles)
39. Hamish Brayshaw (West Coast Eagles)

Entering the AFL National Draft at Pick 49, West Coast opted to go tall by plucking out local ruck, Callum Jamieson. Considered the fourth best ruck in the draft crop and the clear best available by the selection, Jamieson is an overager who is a year further advanced compared to his peers. At 199cm and 84kg he could still add more size to his frame but is more readymade than some other big men in the draft crop. He works hard around the ground and is more mobile than many might think, able to not only roam around the ground as a ruck, but go forward and rest to provide a leading target inside 50. He is strong overhead and whilst being a long-term prospect the Eagles fans might not see for a little bit, he will get plenty of experience working under Nic Naitanui.

With the second selection, the Eagles chose running defender Ben Johnson who might be small at 178cm, but he has a penetrating kick that is eye-catching as much as it is damaging to the opposition. At Pick 58, Johnson looms as good value and hailing from West Perth does not need to relocate for his senior football, staying in Western Australia. Like Jamieson, Johnson is lightly built and at 68kg and will need to spend a year in the gym adding size to his frame to compete against the stronger small forwards. He is most damaging with his offensive output through rebounding and running, though can play accountable football in the back half as a defensive player.

Looking to the Rookie Draft, the Eagles picked up late bloomer, Anthony Treacy and draft slider, Mitch O’Neill. Treacy, who rose all the way from the amateurs to have a good season with Claremont in the WAFL showing off his skills and decision making in the forward half. O’Neill similarly has terrific skills and decision making and might have been overlooked due to his 176cm and 72kg size, as well as his on-and-off ankle injuries. But without a doubt if O’Neill lives up to his potential, the dual All-Australian could make a lot of clubs look silly and be the value pick of this draft with his versatility and clean hands among his standout traits. Given that he was considered a first rounder by some prior to the season, Eagles fans should be over the moon to snaffle the Tasmanian at Pick 25 in the Rookie Draft. The Eagles concluded their draft period by redrafting Brendon Ah Chee and Hamish Brayshaw.

Overall, the Eagles were able to stay local for three of their four picks, then grabbed O’Neill to add class and massive value at that selection, making the most of a draft where their picks were not ideal.

2019 Rookie Draft selections

IN an event that took about the same time as one first night National Draft selection, the 2019 AFL Rookie Draft was held today with 33 selections made and nine passes. A total of 13 players will enter the AFL for the first time, while Williamstown’s Mitch Hibberd returns to the elite level after a sensational year with Williamstown earning him a place back on an AFL list. Among those players to find a home were Western Jets’ duo Josh Honey and Emerson Jeka, Gippsland Power excitement machine Fraser Phillips, West Australian talents Jarvis Pina, Anthony Treacy and Jake Pasini, Sandringham Dragons’ ruck Jack Bell, Bendigo Pioneers’ outside mover Brady Rowles, Port Adelaide father-son prospect Trent Burgoyne, South Australian bolter Brad Close, and arguably the most surprising omission from the AFL National Draft – dual All-Australian Mitch O’Neill.

Clubs are still making Category B selections, with Matt McGuinness named as one by the Roos, which we will include in our club-by-club summaries to come later today.

ROUND 1

Pick 1 – Gold Coast SUNS – Josh Schoenfeld (redrafted)
Pick 2 – Melbourne – Pass
Pick 3 – Carlton – Josh Honey (Western Jets/Vic Metro
) | 185cm | 82kg | Midfielder/Forward
Pick 4 – Sydney – Brady Rowles (Bendigo Pioneers/Vic Country) | 186cm | 75kg | Outside Midfielder
Pick 5 – St Kilda – Jack Bell (Sandringham Dragons/Vic Metro) | 202cm | 81kg | Ruck/Key Forward
Pick 6 – Fremantle – Jarvis Pina (Peel Thunder/Western Australia) | 178cm | 72kg | Midfielder/Forward
Pick 7 – Adelaide – Ben Keays (Brisbane Lions/AFL)
Pick 8 – Port Adelaide – Jake Pasini (Swan Districts/Western Australia) | 192cm | 81kg | Tall Defender
Pick 9 – Hawthorn – Emerson Jeka (Western Jets/Vic Metro) | 198cm | 91kg | Key Position Utility
Pick 10 – Essendon – Mitchell Hibberd (Williamstown/VFL) | 192cm | 87kg | Midfielder
Pick 11 – West Coast – Anthony Treacy (Claremont/Western Australia) | 182cm | 69kg | Medium Forward
Pick 12 – Brisbane – Sam Skinner (redrafted)
Pick 13 – Collingwood – Pass
Pick 14 – Geelong – Brad Close (Glenelg/South Australia) | 180cm | 68kg | Midfielder/Forward
Pick 15 – GWS GIANTS – Jake Stein (redrafted)

ROUND 2:

Pick 16 – Gold Coast SUNS – Connor Budarick (GC SUNS Academy/Allies) | 177cm | 74kg | Small Utility
Pick 17 – Melbourne – Pass
Pick 18 – Carlton – Fraser Phillips (Gippsland Power/Vic Country) | 187cm | 72kg | Medium Forward
Pick 19 – Sydney – Jack Maibaum (redrafted)
Pick 20 – Fremantle – Thomas North (redrafted)
Pick 21 – Adelaide – Ben Crocker (Collingwood AFL)
Pick 22 – Port Adelaide – Trent Burgoyne (WWT Eagles/South Australia) | 177cm | 67kg | Outside Midfielder
Pick 23 – Hawthorn – Pass
Pick 24 – Essendon – Pass
Pick 25 – West Coast – Mitch O’Neill (Tasmania Devils/Allies) | 176cm | 72kg | Balanced Midfielder
Pick 26 – Brisbane – Corey Lyons (redrafted)
Pick 27 – Geelong – Oscar Brownless (redrafted)
Pick 28 – GWS GIANTS – Thomas Sheridan (redrafted)

ROUND 3:

Pick 29 – Gold Coast SUNS – Matt Conroy (GC SUNS Academy/Allies) | 201cm | 97kg | Ruck/ Key Forward
Pick 30 – Fremantle – Hugh Dixon (redrafted)
Pick 31 – Adelaide – Pass
Pick 32 – Port Adelaide – Boyd Woodcock (redrafted)
Pick 33 – West Coast – Brendon Ah Chee (redrafted)
Pick 34 – Brisbane – Archie Smith (redrafted)
Pick 35 – Geelong – Lachlan Henderson (redrafted)
Pick 36 – GWS GIANTS – Zachary Sproule (redrafted)

ROUND 4:

Pick 37 – Gold Coast SUNS – Malcolm Rosas (NT Thunder/Allies) | 178cm | 69kg | Outside Midfielder
Pick 38 – Port Adelaide – Riley Grundy (redrafted)
Pick 39 – West Coast – Hamish Brayshaw (redrafted)
Pick 40 – GWS GIANTS – Pass

ROUND 5:

Pick 41 – Gold Coast SUNS – Pass
Pick 42 – West Coast – Pass

Drafting for diamonds: Finding value outside the first round

WITH the first round of the AFL Draft done and dusted, we take a look at which players are still on the board and those who could provide great value on Day 2 of the draft. Below are 15 players that should pop up over the course of the night on ability, but for one reason or another might have just fallen outside the early stages of the draft.

Trent Bianco
Oakleigh Chargers/Vic Metro | Midfielder/Defender
20/01/2001 | 178cm | 73kg

The exciting midfielder/defender from Oakleigh co-captained his side to a NAB League premiership this year and offers great value for a club looking to add to its skilful smalls. He will likely land somewhere in the mid 20s, and clubs may even consider trading up for him, with Brisbane one of a number of clubs keen on him. With sliders such as Deven Robertson slipping into the second round, it will be interesting to see what impacts it has on other players.

Karl Finlay
North Adelaide/South Australia | Tall Defender
14/07/2001 | 193cm | 90kg

One of the more underrated defensive options, Finlay can play tall or small and while he is that tad undersized, is a prominent rebounder. Given he has a point of difference compared to many readymade options with elite agility, Finlay can provide an intercepting force while being accountable. The South Australian is expected to come into consideration somewhere in the late second round, but may even slide to the early third round depending on where clubs pounce.

Will Gould
Glenelg/South Australia | Tall Defender
14/01/2001 | 192cm | 106kg

The quintessential slideri, Gould on ability is a first round pick and the knocks – largely on his athleticism have seen the South Australian captain drift down the boards. Expect him to not be around too long though, with a selection expected to come in the second round. He might be slightly undersized for a key defender, but is a powerful player with great leadership abilities, elite vision and an elite penetrating kick. Screams as a player who will really prove some clubs wrong once in an AFL environment, and while there are areas to work on, is highly rated by each club he has played for and will knuckle down and be a club favourite.

Harrison Jones
Calder Cannons/Vic Metro | Key Position Utility
25/02/2001 | 196cm | 78kg

Initially expected to be a second round pick, the Calder Cannons tall was rumoured to be in favour with a number of clubs inside the top 20, but with Sam De Koning and Mitch Georgiades the chosen couple of talls in the teens, Jones remains on the board in night two. He could be the source of a live trade with a number of clubs, including Collingwood keen to secure him – though Port Adelaide could well use Pick 22 on him without trading it.

Finn Maginness
Sandringham Dragons/Vic Metro | Inside Midfielder
23/02/2001 | 189cm | 82kg

Hawthorn fans would have rejoiced that their father-son selection in Maginness made it through to the second round. While they will have no trouble matching the bid with the points they have, with every pick that goes by, it means their third selection in the draft will be higher. An inside midfielder who has plenty of development left, just needs to iron out his kicking and accumulation, but will be a value pick in the second round.

Mitch O’Neill
Tasmania Devils/Allies | Small Utility
21/02/2001 | 176cm | 72kg

An ankle injury has had the skilful utility impacted over the past 18 months, but it has not stopped him stepping up to become a dual All-Australian. He is only small at 176cm, but he uses the ball well and can play on any line from half-back to half-forward. O’Neill takes the game on and has plenty of eye-catching traits, but given his size and some areas that need work on, he will likely slip into the late second or third round.

Fraser Phillips
Gippsland Power/Vic Country | Medium Forward
15/05/2001 | 187cm | 72kg

Possibly the highest upside of anyone, Phillips has enormous scope for the future and clubs view him as a player with the potential to move into the midfield. A clean mover with great goal sense, Phillips regularly hits the scoreboard and defies the usual medium forward tag with his ground level work and work rate up the ground. While he is a long-term prospect with areas to work on, he could end up one of the better players in the draft given his huge potential.

Jay Rantall
GWV Rebels/Vic Country | Inside Midfielder
10/06/2001 | 185cm | 83kg

Rantall should be one of the first names off the board tonight with Brisbane and Adelaide among those clubs interested in the hard running midfielder. Boasting an elite endurance base and the ability to play inside or outside, Rantall is a former Australian basketballer who is capable of stepping up to the elite level after making immense progress on his game in 2019.

Trent Rivers
East Fremantle/Western Australia | Midfielder/Defender
30/07/2001 | 188cm | 83kg

A consistent ball winner from Western Australia, Rivers uses the ball well and can play a multitude of positions. Expect him to play off half-back to start with at AFL level, then roam along a wing or through the middle with time. He is that taller size midfielder who has room for growth, but not a great deal of flaws across the board. Hard to read where he falls, but could be anywhere in the second round.

Deven Robertson
Perth/Western Australia | Inside Midfielder
30/06/2001 | 184cm | 81kg

The most talked about slider of the AFL Draft, Robertson was touted as highly as Pick 7 to Fremantle, then with rumours that Geelong and Gold Coast were interested. Given the SUNS traded up to get Sam Flanders and the Cats opted for Cooper Stephens instead, Robertson remarkably remains on the board at Pick 22. Brisbane would be excited he is a possibility, but with live trading in play, the likes of Adelaide or North Melbourne could also trade up to try secure the West Australian captain.

Jeremy Sharp
East Fremantle/Western Australia | Midfielder/Defender
13/08/2001 | 189cm | 79kg

A running outside midfielder who can play at half-back or half-forward, Sharp is a dual All-Australian which is no easy feat. Despite his upside of athleticism and penetrating kick, Sharp does have to improve his kicking consistency at times, and build an inside game, running at just over 20 per cent contested possessions across the past three years. Regardless, Sharp does move well and could be an option for a club looking at a player in transition who could be stationed at half-back and pump the ball long.

Cameron Taheny
Norwood/South Australia | Medium Forward
03/08/2001 | 185cm | 80kg

A talented medium forward who has had injury and form concerns at times, Taheny is capable of the impossible, and one of the clubs in the 20s from Adelaide, North Melbourne or Sydney would surely consider him at a pick in the range. Good in the air and an accurate shot at goal, Taheny has shown how dominant he can be with a six-goal haul in the SANFL Reserves, and while he has played League football in South Australia, still has to build his endurance to become a more consistent player. Rated by some in South Australia as a top 10 prospect on ability.

Elijah Taylor
Perth/Western Australia | Medium Forward
01/05/2001 | 188cm | 77kg

Garnering interest from quite a few clubs including Sydney, Taylor is an exciting forward who can do some amazing things with the football. Still very light, Taylor is a long-term prospect but has high upside for the future. The Swans could use their next selection on him, or a club may try and jump in front with the likes of North Melbourne and Carlton potentially in the market for a forward.

Dylan Williams
Oakleigh Chargers | Medium Forward
01/07/2001 | 186cm | 81kg

Similar to Taheny, Williams has had his fair share of injuries and form concerns, but you cannot imagine he will last too long past the second round. He was a dominant player in the TAC Cup Finals series in 2018, but his NAB League top-age year was underwhelming. Possessing ridiculous talent and upside, as well as natural footballing ability, Williams also has natural leadership, co-captaining Oakleigh Chargers this year. A genuine diamond in the rough if he can realise his potential at a club and get his body right.

Josh Worrell
Sandringham Dragons/Vic Metro | Key Utility
11/04/2001 | 195cm | 83kg

The Vic Metro leading goalkicker from the Under-18 Championships, Worrell is just as adept at playing in defence. While he is still a lighter build, Worrell has the size to compete on the key position players and outside of Robertson, was the next biggest surprise to remain undrafted from the first round.

2019 Draft Central Phantom Draft

THE 2019 AFL National Draft is just a couple of days away and it is clear that trying to work out which clubs favour which players is incredibly difficult given the evenness of the draft crop outside the first round. Even inside the first round, preferences will play a huge role in where players go with certain clubs battling with another one or two for certain players. In this Phantom Draft, we have done the first three rounds, but have not included any live trades which will undoubtedly come in on the night.

ROUND 1:

1 Gold Coast – Matt Rowell
Oakleigh Chargers/Vic Metro | Inside Midfielder
01/07/2001 | 180cm | 78kg

The number one pick has been in little doubt for many months now, with the Oakleigh Chargers ball magnet a standout player throughout the 2019 season. He won nearly every accolade he possibly could, and never played a bad game. Rowell will have been prepared for the move north for some time now and he will be a Round 1 starter for the SUNS.

2 Gold Coast – Noah Anderson
Oakleigh Chargers/Vic Metro | Midfielder/Forward
17/02/2001 | 191cm | 87kg

Like Rowell, expect Anderson to suit up in Round 1, likely playing forward as a marking target who can also rotate through the midfield. He has a high scope of improvement given he is that prototype tall midfielder who has a nice burst of speed through the middle, so expect him to be one who catches the eye quite often.

3 Melbourne – Luke Jackson
East Fremantle/Western Australia | Ruck
29/09/2001 | 199cm | 94kg

The Demons caused a bit of a stir when they announced Jackson as a potential top three pick. Not because of his ability because that was never in doubt, but the fact they were willing to risk a top three pick on a ruck which bucks the trend of recent years. A former Australian basketballer, Jackson was highly sought after by the GIANTS and Dockers among others, so the Dees had to pull the trigger at pick three. Hayden Young was the other consideration at the selection.

4 GWS – Lachlan Ash
Murray Bushrangers/Vic Country | Defender
21/06/2001 | 187cm | 83kg

While at first many thought that Hayden Young might be the pick here – or Jackson if the Dees went with Young – the GIANTS have opted towards the speedy and slick half-back Lachlan Ash who provides great run and carry out of defence. Nathan Wilson left to go to Fremantle two years ago, and the inclusion of Ash allows Zac Williams to play more midfield time if required. An elite kick with terrific athleticism.

5 Sydney – Sam Flanders
Gippsland Power/Vic Country | Mid/Forward
24/06/2001 | 183cm | 82kg

The Swans are believed to be tossing up between Gippsland Power teammates, Sam Flanders and Caleb Serong. Flanders provides that slight more height and elite hands on the inside, while being a match-winner up forward. He still has areas of consistency to work on, but in terms of what he could become, the ceiling is endless. At this selection, Sydney cannot do too much wrong, but Flanders will offer them plenty of highlights inside 50 in the early days before developing into a midfielder in time.

6 Adelaide – Fischer McAsey
Sandringham Dragons/Vic Metro | Key Position Utility
08/03/2001 | 197cm | 91kg

The Crows were weighing up four potential players at this selection, and expected this pick to be a choice between Dylan Stephens and Fischer McAsey. McAsey is the option to be that key defensive replacement for Alex Keath, while being able to play inside 50 if required as a switch man. If Sydney opt for Stephens, then Flanders would be another thought for the Crows potentially.

7 Fremantle – Hayden Young
Dandenong Stingrays/Vic Country | Defender
11/04/2001 | 188cm | 83kg

An absolute steal here at Pick 8, but that is the way it looks like panning out, with Fremantle picking up elite kick Hayden Young with Pick 8. The Dockers would consider Stephens if available, and given Stephens is still on the board, might even lean towards the Gippsland Power mid/forward. Fremantle seem pretty settled with this selection given Young could well have been gone by Pick 3.

8 Fremantle – Caleb Serong
Gippsland Power/Vic Country | Midfielder/Forward
09/02/2001 | 178cm | 83kg

Another steal here with the Gippsland Power strong midfielder/forward Caleb Serong landing in Fremantle. Fremantle might have looked at grabbing West Australian captain Deven Robertson to begin with, but once it became clear Serong would be available, the Dockers have narrowed their sights on Vic Country’s Most Valuable Player (MVP). He is so strong overhead he is more than capable of matching it with taller players, while his competitive nature and desire to be the best possible player will provide the Blues with a really strong option going forward.

9 Carlton – Dylan Stephens
Norwood/South Australia | Outside Midfielder
08/01/2001 | 183cm | 74kg

While the Blues were originally thought to have eyed off Caleb Serong, it looks like Dylan Stephens will be the one left on the board presuming Adelaide opt for Fischer McAsey. Stephens is the best available and also fits a need, with the outside mover capable of playing from next year. Already having played at SANFL League level, Stephens adds a high work rate and strong character to the side. Deven Robertson would be a consideration here, as would down-trading to grab a couple of first round picks.

10 GWS (matched/bid) – Tom Green
GWS GIANTS Academy/Allies | Inside Midfielder
23/01/2001 | 190cm | 89kg

There is a reason the GIANTS moved from Pick 6 to Pick 4, and that was because the Swans had committed to bid on GIANTS Academy member Tom Green. They have publicly said they are unlikely to do so now, but will still force GWS out of the draft and into deficit, but the GIANTS will happily cop that given they pick up Green to join Ash as a couple of elite talents at the club. Either could start from early on, and expect Green to have a real impact from the moment he gets out there.

11 Melbourne – Cody Weightman
Dandenong Stingrays/Vic Country | Forward
15/01/2001 | 178cm | 75kg

The Demons are set on picking up a small forward at this selection, with Cody Weightman and Kysaiah Pickett the two most talked about at this selection. The Demons have put plenty of time and effort into Weightman and might just get the nudge over Pickett, but it is a lineball call. The Dees also could consider Miles Bergman at this pick given the Dragons’ forward could develop into a taller midfielder, but the firepower up forward is what the Dees are after.

12 Fremantle (matched/bid) – Liam Henry
Claremont/Western Australia | Midfielder/Forward
28/08/2001 | 180cm | 68kg

A bid for Liam Henry was always going to come in the first round and push Fremantle well down to the back-end of the draft, but the Dockers will not be too worried in matching this bid. Having already picked up Hayden Young and Caleb Serong, they have filled three different spots in their team and the exciting Next Generation Academy prospect in Henry will provide plenty of highlights over the coming years.

13 Hawthorn – Brodie Kemp
Bendigo Pioneers/Vic Country | Utility
01/05/2001 | 192cm | 89kg

Versatile tall Brodie Kemp is somewhat of a slider here and could well slide further to Port Adelaide or Geelong. Will eventually be an inside midfielder, but can play a third tall role at either end of the ground and had a terrific Under-18 Championships. Is overcoming an ACL injury sustained mid-year.

14 Port Adelaide – Will Day
West Adelaide/South Australia | Defender
06/05/2001 | 189cm | 76kg

Get the feeling the first of Port Adelaide’s picks will be between Day, Bergman and Kemp depending on who is available. The slick ball user from West Adelaide, Day has links to Gold Coast with his cousin Sam there, and would be a huge chance to be off the board before Port Adelaide’s second selection. After adding skilled users last year in Connor Rozee, Xavier Duursma and Zak Butters, Day adds that extra touch of class coming off half-back and is a good size at 189cm.

15 Western Bulldogs – Kysaiah Pickett
WWT Eagles/South Australia | Small Forward
02/06/2001 | 171cm | 71kg

One of a couple of draft bolters, Kysaiah Pickett is well in consideration to be taken by Melbourne at Pick 10 (to become 11), but the Dogs will be all over the tenacious small forward if he drops. Miles Bergman is the other potential choice here, while if the Dees go with Pickett, expect Cody Weightman to be the strong chance for Pick 15. Pickett is still very light but loves the contested aspect of the game and the Dogs have shown through drafting Caleb Daniel, they are not worried about height but instead look at skill and Pickett has bucketloads of that.

16 Geelong – Deven Robertson
Perth/Western Australia | Inside Midfielder
30/06/2001 | 184cm | 81kg

Robertson was rumoured to be a possible top 10 selection, with the West Australian captain leading from the front during the Under-18 Championships to win the Larke Medal and state Most Valuable Player (MVP) award. Would be a steal here for Geelong but a number of clubs along the way would be looking at him carefully. A future captain at AFL level.

17 Gold Coast – Trent Bianco
Oakleigh Chargers/Vic Metro | Midfielder/Defender
20/01/2001 | 178cm | 73kg

It is thought that this selection will be between Will Day and Trent Bianco, and with Port taking Day off the board in this scenario, Bianco is the man to step up to the plate. Port would also be keen on picking up Bianco if Day is snapped up elsewhere, so the Suns will want to use this selection on him. He joins Matt Rowell and Noah Anderson from the Oakleigh Chargers program up on the Gold Coast and adds more leadership to the side coming into that team. Will provide skill and dash off half-back.

18 Port Adelaide – Josh Worrell
Sandringham Dragons/Vic Metro | Key Position Utility
11/04/2001 | 195cm | 83kg

With the skilful defender in Will Day secured, Port will look to bring in a tall to replenish some of their stocks lost over the off-season. Well aware that Geelong is in the business of finding a key position player, the Power will have to pounce at this selection rather than wait another two picks. Knowing they will likely just take the one tall, getting one here and knowing the Cats will take a tall at the next pick allows them to go best available at Pick 20. Josh Worrell can play either end and is great value here as a long-term developing tall.

19 Geelong – Harrison Jones
Calder Cannons/Vic Metro | Key Position Utility
25/02/2001 | 196cm | 78kg

After a couple of talls dropped in the top 10, Geelong and Port may well do a merry dance to snap up the next couple and see who will pounce on who in the back-end of the first round. With Port having the first chance at Pick 18, Geelong will either need to pounce on Josh Worrell and risk losing Deven Robertson, or take the chance and secure the developing utility in Harrison Jones. Jones is as versatile as they come and has even spent time in the ruck this year. Whilst he might be considered a bolter to land in the first round, his athletic attributes – mainly his speed and endurance – make him a player to watch.

20 Port Adelaide – Miles Bergman
Sandringham Dragons/Vic Metro | Mid/Forward
18/010/2001 | 189cm | 83kg

Port would look at teaming up Will Day with Trent Bianco at this selection – if Bianco was left on the board – to continue the influx of speed and skill, but Miles Bergman being on the board is the choice here. Bergman could well be snapped up by Melbourne, or the Western Bulldogs who are both in the market for a small forward, meaning one of Weightman or Pickett could be left for the Power to secure. Bergman has the height on the others and could well develop into a midfielder who can hit the scoreboard, and played most of the year sore but still had terrific moments in 2019.

21 Hawthorn (matched/bid) – Finn Maginness
Sandringham Dragons/Vic Metro | Inside Midfielder
23/02/2001 | 189cm | 82kg

Given Richmond is targeting inside midfielders, it is tipped that the Tigers will place a bid on Finn Maginness at the end of the first round. The Hawks will quickly match the bid to bring the midfielder into the club, and traded picks to ensure they have plenty of points available. This bid would see the Hawks lose Picks 44 and 52 (which are given up due to Academy bids, whilst Pick 56 would slide to Pick 63).

22 Richmond – Cooper Stephens
Geelong Falcons/Vic Country | Inside Midfielder
17/01/2001 | 188cm | 83kg

With the Maginness bid match, Richmond will focus its attention on securing that inside midfielder. Geelong Falcons’ Cooper Stephens is among a number of selections left on the board and could well be snapped up at this pick. Jay Rantall is a consideration, though Stephens is more readymade to slot straight into the line-up and will be that pure inside midfielder with time. A good size at 188cm, Stephens is one who will have an immediate impact.

ROUND 2:

23 Gold Coast – Trent Rivers
East Fremantle/Western Australia | Midfielder/Defender
30/07/2001 | 188cm | 83kg

There is every chance Rivers is at a new club by Wednesday night, but if he is not, then he will not take long at all to come off the board at this selection. The four clubs over the next five picks would all be keen on the tall midfielder who can also play other roles around the ground, and has good development left.

24 Brisbane – Jay Rantall
GWV Rebels/Vic Country | Inside Midfielder
10/06/2001 | 185cm | 83kg

Could go as high as Richmond in Round 1, but more likely to land at either Brisbane or Adelaide in Round 2. The Lions cannot not risk him dropping to their next pick, so would need to pounce with #24 and add an extra Rebel to the mix. Elite endurance and can play multiple roles through the midfield. A former Australian basketballer.

25 Adelaide – Jeremy Sharp
East Fremantle/Western Australia | Midfielder/Defender
13/08/2001 | 189cm | 79kg

Picked at this selection because of his ability to provide outside run and carry, and can fulfil that role coming off half-back. A dual All-Australian, the knocks are whether or not he can win the contested ball, but at 189cm and the ability to hit penetrating passes makes him too good to turn down. Not completely out of the question for him to slip a bit further, however.

26 Adelaide – Sam De Koning
Dandenong Stingrays/Vic Country | Key Position Utility
26/02/2001 | 201cm | 86kg

Given the Crows have picked up Fischer McAsey, they may err on collecting another key position player, but like McAsey, Sam De Koning has an ability to play at both ends, or even through the ruck. He is the last of the top 30 talls available, so the Crows might want to bundle him up with McAsey. If they end up with Dylan Stephens at Pick 6, expect De Koning to be a massive shot here – if available.

27 Geelong – Thomson Dow
Bendigo Pioneers/Vic Country | Midfielder/Forward
16/10/2001 | 184cm | 76kg

A number of picks the Cats could make at this selection, but Thomson Dow seems very ‘Geelong’ like. Another Geelong Grammar boy to possibly go with Brodie Kemp or in this phantom, Deven Robertson, Dow is the brother of Carlton’s Paddy. While he is not as readymade as his brother, he has similar athleticism and is good inside 50 on the lead. A forward to start his career, but will eventually develop into a full-time midfielder.

28 Sydney – Elijah Taylor
Perth/Western Australia | Medium Forward
01/05/2001 | 188cm | 77kg

Elijah Taylor is incredibly talented and adds more X-factor to a Swans side that will have already brought Sam Flanders earlier in the draft in this Phantom Draft scenario. Taylor is a good size at 188cm, and while staying in Western Australia might be a priority, the Swans have a good system in place to make players from interstate fit in well. Far too good to ignore at this selection, and if bypassed, chances are he will not be there at the Swans’ next selection.

29 North Melbourne – Will Gould
Glenelg/South Australia | Tall Defender
14/01/2001 | 192cm | 106kg

Surely the South Australian captain could not drop this far? It is possible, and some think it might be into the 30s. He could go as high as Gold Coast at 23, or maybe even Adelaide at 26 if De Koning is off the board, but Gould will slide outside the top 20. He is an unbelievable talent, and one we have rated in the top 15 most of the year. Elite footballing qualities, once he gets into an AFL environment, he will likely prove a few people wrong. A bargain at this selection.

30 North Melbourne – Cameron Taheny
Norwood/South Australia | Medium Forward
03/08/2001 | 185cm | 80kg

There is a feeling the Roos will pick a small forward at their selections, whether it be Cameron Taheny, Elijah Taylor or Dylan Williams. With Williams touted to slide the furthest when it is all said and done, Taheny looks to be the more readymade prospect for North, and the transition into the blue and white stripes will be made easier in this scenario coming across with Gould. Another bargain pick.

31 Melbourne – Darcy Cassar
Western Jets/Vic Metro | Utility
31/07/2001 | 184cm | 82kg

Providing some speed and dash off half-back with neat kicking skills, Darcy Cassar is a player with some top shelf traits, and just needs to iron out inconsistencies to take the next step. At his best he is contending for a top 20 spot, and Melbourne fit the need they were targeting at the top end of the draft in a skilful half-back by adding Cassar to their list in the second round.

32 Brisbane – Dylan Williams
Oakleigh Chargers | Medium Forward
01/07/2001 | 186cm | 81kg

An interesting selection looms for the Lions at this pick, and the likes of Harry Schoenberg and Sam Philp were considered, but given the Lions have picked up a number of exciting players with upside in recent years, Dylan Williams is one who might appeal to them. He might not fit a direct need, but at this selection he is a bargain and also has those leadership qualities – co-captaining Oakleigh Chargers – and is surely too good to pass up because he will not be there at the next pick.

33 Port Adelaide (matched/bid) – Jackson Mead
WWT Eagles/South Australia | Balanced Midfielder
30/09/2001 | 183cm | 83kg

Port has enough points to match a bid for Jackson Mead at this point in the draft, and will not have a problem matching should a team like North Melbourne put the offer out there. North is known for making bids on players that fill needs, and Mead’s range is tipped to be in this hitting zone. Expected to make his way to the Power without any fuss.

34 North Melbourne – Hugo Ralphsmith
Sandringham Dragons/Vic Metro | Midfielder/Forward
09/11/2001 | 188cm | 75kg

A few options to pick from here, but North has interest in Hugo Ralphsmith, and may well take him with one of their picks inside the top 30. If not and he is still on the board here, Ralphsmith will be difficult to pass up. Sam Philp, Harry Schoenberg and Mitch O’Neill will be considerations, but Ralphsmith may be the first choice.

35 Essendon – Harry Schoenberg
WWT Eagles/South Australia | Inside Midfielder
21/02/2001 | 182cm | 83kg

The South Australian Most Valuable Player (MVP) winner offers a solid inside presence at the selection for the Bombers, with his inside craft and ball-winning abilities among his strengths. Essendon might consider Sam Philp at this selection as well, with the Bombers and Swans potentially targeting similar types to round out their list.

36 Sydney – Sam Philp
Northern Knights/Vic Metro | Inside Midfielder
04/08/2001 | 186cm | 79kg

A perfect fit for the Swans, Sam Philp is a running machine on the inside with terrific burst speed out of the contest – a 2.87-second 20m sprint – which fills a need whilst adding his contested ball winning ability. Despite missing out on Vic Metro selection, Philp offers plenty to the club that picks him, and Sydney could be that club.

37 Essendon – Charlie Comben
Gippsland Power/Vic Country | Forward/Ruck
20/07/2001 | 199cm | 84kg

The Bombers need another ruck for depth, and Comben is a player who can also play that key position forward role. He is a good size and still developing, and given the likes of Collingwood and Geelong are not far away, Essendon might have to make their move at this pick to secure him.

38 Brisbane – Mitch O’Neill
Tasmania Devils/Allies | Small Utility
21/02/2001 | 176cm | 72kg

A steal at Pick 38, Tasmania’s top player makes his way north and will be a welcome addition given his ability to play anywhere on the ground. He adds to the Lions’ skilful and exuberant young side and is another player like Gould who may prove a fair few wrong in the coming years.

39 Collingwood – Mitch Georgiades
Subiaco/Western Australia | Tall Forward
28/09/2001 | 192cm | 87kg

Seems to be the obvious pick for Collingwood, with Mitch Georgiades the best tall forward available at this selection and a clear need for the Magpies. Collingwood might be tempted to opt for a tall defender in Karl Finlay or Dyson Hilder, or maybe the upside of Fraser Phillips, but these are all the selections coming in the next few selections.

40 Geelong – Karl Finlay
North Adelaide/South Australia | Tall Defender
14/07/2001 | 193cm | 90kg

Geelong may not opt for a second tall, but Finlay is the type who has great agility and is able to play on a tall or small in defence, which in this Phantom Draft would allow Harrison Jones to play forward. Finlay is an Under 16s Most Valuable Player (MVP) award winner and it would not be surprising to see him go higher and perhaps even pounced on in the 20s – particularly if De Koning joins the other talls in the first round. Like many talls, it is often a needs basis, so could slide to around here, but Collingwood would seriously consider him with their last pick.

41 Adelaide – Fraser Phillips
Gippsland Power/Vic Country | Medium Forward
15/05/2001 | 187cm | 72kg

Has the talent to become anything, and could end up at a number of clubs in the 30s, but the Crows could not take a chance any longer with Richmond and Carlton no doubt keen to acquire his services. Has the potential to become a midfielder long-term and just moves well and creates havoc inside 50. A player who has drawn traits similar to Jack Macrae and Scott Pendlebury at the same age – even if much rawer than those players.

42 Richmond – Dyson Hilder
North Adelaide/South Australia | Key Defender
31/03/2001 | 196cm | 91kg

With three consecutive selections, Richmond is likely to select one key position player just to add to the depth in the squad, and given they have picked up Cooper Stephens with the first selection, the additional inside midfielder need is filled. Hilder is a readymade key position option, but can work with the Tigers’ back six to become a strong negating defender who is also capable of creating offensive rebound. Another key position player who might go higher than this due to needs.

43 Richmond – Brock Smith
Gippsland Power/Vic Country | Defender
13/03/2001 | 189cm | 82kg

The Gippsland Power captain is a hard nut and would be a perfect fit for Richmond given his accountability in defence and willingness to put his body on the line for his teammates. He showed in 2019 that he can also create offensive drive, and that will be attractive for the Tigers to fill that Brandon Ellis role, or play deeper and release one of the other defenders.

ROUND 3:

44 Richmond – Jack Mahony
Sandringham Dragons | Small Midfielder/Forward
12/11/2001 | 178cm | 72kg

Hard to see Mahony slipping this far, but if he did it would certainly be a bargain. Capable of playing midfield or forward, Mahony rarely wastes a kick and is able to set up his forwards with neat 45-degree passes that can be deadly for the opposition. A high footy IQ and one who will develop into a very handy player.

45 Carlton – Ned Cahill
Dandenong Stingrays/Vic Country | Small Forward
11/01/2001 | 179cm | 78kg

Has been long linked to Carlton at this selection, but will he be there? It is possible, and he fills a perfect need which allows the Blues to go best available at Pick 9. Has a lot of growth left in his game, and is more consistent than a lot of other small forwards. Adds a touch of class inside 50.

46 Sydney – Josh Shute
Sturt/South Australia | Outside Midfielder
28/03/2001 | 187cm | 74kg

While it is becoming increasingly difficult to try and predict which way clubs will go by this stage, the Sturt winger adds some terrific pace and line-breaking willingness that can attract clubs in the third round. He takes the game on and is a good size, just needs to iron out a few things and could be a real valuable contributor on the outside.

47 Adelaide – Daniel Mott
Calder Cannons/Vic Metro | Balanced Midfielder
01/05/2001 | 183cm | 80kg

While Mott is not the fastest midfielder going around, he has such clean hands and skill on the inside, which he has been developing over the past 12 months. Mott can also play outside where he uses his terrific kicking ability to advantage and replaces the wealth of midfield depth that has been lost at the Crows this year.

48 West Coast – Jake Pasini
Swan Districts/Western Australia | Key Defender
06/02/2001 | 193cm | 82kg

West Coast seem tipped to look local at this selection, and one of Jake Pasini, Trey Ruscoe or Riley Garcia might be a choice. Pasini is the tallest option and able to replace one of the Eagles’ key defenders in time, having worked on areas of his game such as his kicking and decision making.

49 North Melbourne – Emerson Jeka
Western Jets/Vic Metro | Key Forward/Defender
18/09/2001 | 198cm | 90kg

A number of clubs over the next few picks are still in the market for a key position player, and with North Melbourne having picked up a number of faster, outside types – as well as Gould – Jeka presents a different option for the Roos. He can play at either end and is an elite contested mark, potentially sharing the forward line with Nick Larkey in years to come, learning from Ben Brown.

50 Collingwood – Jake Riccardi
Werribee/VFL | Key Position Forward
07/11/1999 | 194cm | 96kg

One of the strongest rumours floating around the mid and later stages of the draft is Jake Riccardi to Collingwood, and the Magpies will not want to wait too much longer from here. Could well end up the first State Draft Combine invitee to go in the National AFL Draft, but the question will be whether or not the Magpies pick up two tall forwards – Georgiades and Riccardi – or if they go best available then take Riccardi.

52 St Kilda – Cooper Sharman
Oakleigh Chargers/Vic Metro | Tall Forward
25/07/2000 | 192cm | 79kg

A long-term developing forward, Sharman has great upside and would be considered by some clubs in the 40s. As accurate shot on goal as anyone else, Sharman will not immediately step in due to needing to improve his endurance, but when he does, he would add some great speed on the lead, strong overhead and convert his opportunities. Saints could go a number of ways, but they will like Sharman’s upside.

53 Western Bulldogs – Nick Bryan
Oakleigh Chargers/Vic Metro | Ruck
22/10/2001 | 202cm | 87kg

Arguably the hardest to place in the draft, Nick Bryan could go anywhere from the late 30s, up into the 60s, but Western Bulldogs could opt for some ruck depth at Pick 53 and has been linked here if available. A long-term prospect, Bryan is more a player who will take over in a few years and given his athletic traits, could be something special.

54 Richmond – Ryan Byrnes
Sandringham Dragons/Vic Metro | Balanced Midfielder
03/05/2001 | 182cm | 84kg

A workhorse through the middle, Byrnes has transitioned from a player on the fringes of his NAB League side Sandringham Dragons, to captaining the side, representing Vic Metro and making himself all but a certain draft candidate. He has to build his kicking, but he is dual-sided and a threat out of stoppages with a quick burst here and there and often pumps the ball to the danger zone inside 50. A perfect fit for the Tigers.

55 Carlton – Darcy Chirgwin
Sandringham Dragons/Vic Country | Inside Midfielder
25/07/2001 | 191cm | 80kg

A big-bodied midfielder tipped to slide down later in the draft, Pick 55 for Darcy Chirgwin could be another selection that makes people look silly in the future. He is a perfect fit for the Blues to provide assistance for Patrick Cripps in the midfield and is not afraid to crash and bash around the stoppages.

Others not far away had the draft extended out: Riley Garcia, Callum Jamieson, Trey Ruscoe (Western Australia), Luke Partington, Callum Park, Josh Morris (South Australia), Angus Baker, Liam Delahunty (NSW-ACT), Brady Rowles, Lachlan Williams (Vic Country), Louis Butler, Josh Honey, Lachlan Stapleton (Vic Metro), Frank Anderson, Sam Lowson (VFL)

ACADEMY/FATHER-SON SELECTIONS IN CONTENTION LATE/ROOKIE WITH COMBINE INVITES OR HAVE BEEN NOMINATED:

*Note the below does not mean the club has committed to them – although in some cases they have – it is merely a list of those clubs with players tied to the club that received combine invitations and were in the respective club’s Academy or father-son prospect at the start of the year.

Anzac Lochowiak -> Adelaide
Noah Cumberland, Keidean Coleman, Lachlan Johnson, Bruce Reville and Will Martyn, Tom Griffiths -> Brisbane
Cameron Wild -> Carlton
Isaiah Butters, Leno Thomas -> Fremantle
Ryan Gilmore, Josh Gore, Dirk Koenen -> Gold Coast SUNS
Liam Delahunty, Matt McGrory, James Peatling, Jeromy Lucas, Ed Perryman -> GWS GIANTS
Harrison Pepper -> Hawthorn
Matthew McGuinness -> North Melbourne
Trent Burgoyne -> Port Adelaide
Bigoa Nyuon -> St Kilda
Luke Parks, Hamish Ellem, Jackson Barling, Nicholas Brewer, Samuel Gaden, Max Geddes, Harry Maguire, Samuel Thorne-> Sydney

2019 AFL Draft Preview: North Melbourne Kangaroos

NORTH MELBOURNE comes into the 2019 Draft with a middle-of-the-way hand, allowing the Roos to top up stocks with no real risk at the back end while also having the potential to nab a few real bargains in the second round. With no academy or father-son prospects to make up picks for, they can go in as-is and add some flair to a midfield with bigger, slower bodies.

CURRENT PICKS: 26, 27, 30, 47, 84

NEXT GEN ACADEMY/FATHER-SONS – COMBINE INVITES: Matthew McGuinness

LIST NEEDS:

Midfield speed/class
Goalkicking forwards

FIRST PICK OPTIONS:

The Kangaroos could package up a couple of handy players with picks 26, 27 and 30 able to land a potential slider without worry of missing out on a player they came in hoping to pick up. Ever the antagonists, the Roos have form in making bids and could even be the team to force Port up the order with a bid on Jackson Mead in that range. Elsewhere, Thomson Dow would be a great fit with his power from the stoppages, while the likes of Hugo Ralphsmith and Mitch O’Neill would both be terrific outside options with nice skills. A trio of dynamic medium forwards could also be available in the form of Dylan Williams, Cameron Taheny, and Elijah Taylor – all able to win games off their own boots with bags of goals. Developing key position players Sam De Koning and Charlie Comben could also be thereabouts, with clubs looking to pounce in a draft short of talls.

LIVE TRADE OPTIONS:

While North Melbourne seemed fairly comfortable heading into the 2019 AFL Draft with a couple of mid-20s picks, they picked up another pick shortly after in Pick 30 from Hawthorn, while sending picks 50, 73 and a future second rounder back to the Hawks. It was an interesting trade considering North’s second rounder next year will likely be prior to Pick 30, but the more immediate need for another player, and the fact the Roos have two first rounders next year in a draft where the depth is not as strong, means the second rounder – along with picks 50 and 73 which they would not use – suits them just fine.

REMAINING CROP:

The last of the Kangaroos’ crop will depend on what is available to them earlier on, with picks onwards from the third round always difficult to predict. Cooper Sharman is a third tall with plenty of potential who could slide to pick 47, and GWS Academy product Liam Delahunty is a player with similar attributes who the Roos could bid on in that range. The theme of outside class or midfield zip could see the likes of mature-ager Luke Partington come into the fold, with Under-18s Josh Honey, Josh Shute, and Louis Butler all capable of creating damage going forward. Tall Tasmanian utility Matt McGuinness is another option who could be packaged with the likes of O’Neill to provide that Apple Isle link.

2019 AFL Draft Preview: Carlton Blues

FOR the first time in a long time, Carlton heads into the draft without a stacked hand, featuring only one in the first round and re-entering in the third with a few later picks. A year on from the much-publicised live trade which saw them land pick nine and Liam Stocker, the Blues have hinted they will go in targeting the best available at each pick despite having some holes to plug.

CURRENT PICKS: 9, 43, 57, 70, 85

NOMINATED ACADEMY/FATHER-SONS: Nil

LIST NEEDS:

Small forward
Midfield depth

FIRST PICK OPTIONS:

The openness of the first round means that the Blues’ current first selection will come largely at the mercy of those with picks before them. The player currently in the frame is big-bodied Bendigo utility Brodie Kemp, who unfortunately will not be available for most of his debut year after tearing his ACL late in the season. While his talent is undeniable and he would provide the perfect midfield fold for Patrick Cripps in the future, Carlton looks to still be at the stage where its high-end picks need to be making an impact straight away given the slow development of previous early selections. Elsewhere, Caleb Serong would be a great choice if he slides to pick nine, able to make an impact up forward or win contested ball through the midfield. The same goes for his Gippsland teammate Sam Flanders, but he may well be off the board and would be more of a forward at AFL level. Lifelong Carlton fan Dylan Stephens is a balanced midfielder with senior experience who fans would welcome with open arms, while the Blues are also said to be considering a bid for Fremantle Next Generation Academy (NGA) member Liam Henry – a lively small forward. Fellow West Australian Luke Jackson is the best ruck in the draft, and would be an ideal replacement for the ageing Matthew Kreuzer if available.

LIVE TRADE OPTIONS:

The Blues could do worse than to split pick nine and pick up players which suit their needs at a more correct value. While they hold pick nine in high regard and have some great options there, exciting small forwards Cody Weightman and Kysaiah Pickett will come into contention with picks amid the teens, and they could even pair their choice with a player like Josh Worrell depending on what they trade for. Miles Bergman is another forward option around the 15-mark, while Dylan Williams and Elijah Taylor would be high-upside choices in the 20s. Given a lack of their own NGA and father-son options, the Blues will not have to stack up on picks, but could rather spurn the plans of others in that department.

REMAINING CROP:

Outside class is an area the Blues could look to prop up with pick 43, with Tasmanian Mitch O’Neill one who may slide and provide terrific value in that range. Midfield depth will be the other priority, with the Sandringham pair Ryan Byrnes and Darcy Chirgwin options around the mark alongside Sam Philp and Daniel Mott. A small forward/midfield like Ned Cahill could also pique Carlton’s interest as a safe choice for his position. The Blues often opt to package or go with project players with their late picks, and GWV trio Toby Mahony, Isaac Wareham, and Mitch Martin are all players with great potential who fit the bill. 194cm midfielder Mahony could be of particular interest, while delisted train-on players Josh Deluca and Lukas Webb could also be taken late or with rookie picks.

Draft Central Power Rankings: November 2019 – 40-21

AS the 2019 AFL National Draft is just around the corner, we work up to the November 27-28 event with a three-part Power Rankings series, counting down our top 60 players heading into the AFL Draft. We have not taken into account any draft selections or club needs, it is purely our opinion. Furthermore, given the evenness of the draft, there were plenty of unlucky players on the cusp of making it into the top 60. This edition looks at the players we have ranked 40-21.

#40 Daniel Mott
Calder Cannons/Vic Metro | Balanced Midfielder
01/05/2001 | 183cm | 80kg

The Calder Cannons’ midfielder improved his game in 2019, moving on from being a slick outside ball user in his bottom-age year, to win more of the hardball this season. While his start to the year was a little shaky, Mott built into the role nicely and by year’s end was performing consistently well for the Cannons during their run to the semi-finals. Averaging a handy 25.6 disposals per game with a 44.7 per cent contested rate, Mott was a high handball receive player, but one who could also do damage by foot. He was usually the second possession winner at a stoppage, tasked with putting boot to ball and trying to hit a target forward. While not overly athletic in terms of his speed, Mott has the smarts and precision kicking that when given time and space, can be a danger to the opposition. A captain at the Cannons, Mott is a leader as well which adds to his profile.

#39 Hugo Ralphsmith
Sandringham Dragons/Vic Metro | Midfielder/Forward
09/11/2001 | 188cm | 75kg

Rated by some clubs as a top 30 prospect, Ralphsmith is expected to land somewhere in that second or early third round range. Standing at a good size of 188cm, Ralphsmith is still quite light at 75kg, but has a high upside for the future with his ability to play forward or as an outside midfielder. Often roaming up and down the wing, the Dragons’ talent showed he can impact a game in a quarter, booting three first quarter goals against Calder Cannons in the semi-finals to effectively put the Dragons on their way to a winning effort in the low-scoring affair. While his four quarter consistency is still an area of improvement, athletically Ralphsmith competes with the best of them, possessing an 86cm running vertical leap and a 2.974-second 20m sprint. A longer-term prospect compared to some others, he has those neat traits with ball-in-hand that make him an attractive prospect to clubs.

#38 Sam Philp
Northern Knights/Vic Metro | Inside Midfielder
04/08/2001 | 186cm | 79kg

An inside midfielder who has bolted up the draft order with a consistent year, Philp put missing out on Vic Metro selection behind him to take out the Northern Knights Best and Fairest award this season. Not always showing it in the early days, Philp’s breakaway speed came to the fore in the mid and latter parts of the season, with his rare speed/endurance mix becoming a headache for opposition players. A pure inside midfielder, not many others possess both athletic traits, with Philp recording a 2.86-second 20m sprint and 21.5 yo-yo test at the National Draft Combine. It basically means the Northern Knights speedster can burn off his opponents over games, as well as from stoppages with great separation. Areas he can improve include his kicking consistency and his outside game, but when it comes to an inside ball winner with plenty of tricks, Philp is a player who has flown under the radar this season. He is someone in the mid-part of the draft who can offer speed and competitiveness to any side through the middle.

#37 Ned Cahill
Dandenong Stingrays/Vic Country | Small Forward
11/01/2001 | 179cm | 78kg

A hard working small forward who has developed more and more through the midfield as the season went on, Cahill had a pretty consistent season when compared to other similar type players. While his four quarter consistency can still improve, Cahill was able to be a shining light for the Stingrays, averaging 1.4 goals per game from 18.3 disposals and 3.6 marks. Not overly strong, and sometimes he can make mistakes under pressure, Cahill has that touch of class when he goes near the ball and a high footy IQ that ensures he knows how to extract a ball from a tough situation. He will likely play as a small forward at the elite level because that is where he is most damaging, but he can also pinch-hit through the middle to some degree, and that will set him in good stead for the future.

#36 Harry Schoenberg
WWT Eagles/South Australia | Inside Midfielder
21/02/2001 | 182cm | 83kg

A real surprise packet this year, Schoenberg produced a consistent season, leading to his Most Valuable Player (MVP) award for South Australia at the Under-18 Championships. Playing in a midfield alongside highly touted prospects Dylan Stephens and Jackson Mead, Schoenberg was the most consistent of the lot, earning All-Australian honours and winning the ball more than everyone bar Larke Medallist, Deven Robertson. He can play inside or out, but is more prominent on the inside due to a lower athletic base, which includes a 3.13-second 20m sprint and 20.3 yo-yo test at the National Draft Combine. He does not need the athletic traits for the role he plays, which is often winning the ball in close and getting it out to runners on the outside. In seven games for the Eagles’ Under 18s side, Schoenberg averaged 24.4 disposals, 5.3 marks, 4.7 tackles, 5.9 clearances and 4.1 inside 50s, with a contested possession rate of 49.4 per cent. He is a natural ball winner who plays a simple game to best advantage his team.

#35 Darcy Cassar
Western Jets/Vic Metro | Utility
31/07/2001 | 184cm | 82kg

Having had experience in all thirds of the ground – playing mid/forward as a bottom-ager last year, and as a defender/forward at points this season, Cassar has versatility on his side. He stepped it up in a mid-season purple patch for the Western Jets where he even racked up 40-plus disposals coming out of defence. Averaging 69.6 per cent by foot, Cassar was typically deployed as a rebounding defender who was the choice to dispose of the ball cleanly when moving in transition. He did only win the football in a contest 35.6 per cent of the time, but it was also his role that lead to this. Cassar does have power on his side in the way he moves, with a 3.01-second 20m sprint, as well as good endurance that helps him run out games. His upside is quite solid as well given what he has shown over the past 18 months, and depending on where AFL clubs might want to deploy him at the elite level, it will be interesting to see how his career progresses and what role he will play at the top level.

#34 Sam De Koning
Dandenong Stingrays/Vic Country | Key Position Utility
26/02/2001 | 201cm | 86kg

An All-Australian key defender, De Koning’s top form came at the Under-18 Championships where the Vic Country tall was named at full-back for his consistent efforts across the carnival. He showed similar signs at NAB League level throughout different points, but still had some consistency issues. He is aerially very strong despite a lower vertical leap, reading the play in flight and positioning himself well inside the defensive 50. As he showed early in the season in Dandenong Stingrays’ draw with Geelong Falcons at Queen Elizabeth Oval, De Koning can be thrown forward and also kick multiple goals in a quarter. At 201cm, De Koning is a good size for whatever role he might play, and is similar to his brother Tom in terms of his versatility, but is more readymade for senior football. Still more likely to be a longer term prospect, De Koning could provide valuable support in a defence for a developing side, and outside the top 15 is the best key defensive prospect.

#33 Fraser Phillips
Gippsland Power/Vic Country | Medium Forward
15/05/2001 | 187cm | 72kg

While inconsistency has plagued him and his endurance still needs improvement, Phillips’ upside is one of the highest of any player in the AFL Draft crop this year. He is exciting, can do the impossible when forward, moves well and can launch goals from outside 50 off a couple of steps like few others. At 187cm he is a good size for that forward-midfield role, though at 72kg he still has a way to go to build into his body. Once he can get into an elite program and add size to his frame and improve his endurance, he could be a great value pick-up for a club in the second or third rounds. In 2019, Phillips averaged 13.6 disposals, 3.9 marks and 1.9 goals per game, regularly hitting the scoreboard whilst laying three tackles per game to provide some defensive pressure as well. He looked his most damaging inside forward 50, and while sometimes his aim might be off when setting his sights on the big sticks, he always looked like having an impact.

#32 Kysaiah Pickett
WWT Eagles/South Australia | Small Forward
02/06/2001 | 171cm | 71kg

One of the smallest AFL Draft prospect running around, Pickett is the nephew of former North Melbourne and Port Adelaide premiership player, Byron. Possessing a similar toughness, as well as an appetite for goals, Pickett is a defensive pressure specialist inside 50 and ticks all the boxes you want from a pressure small forward. He chases, he tackles, he creates opportunities and he finishes. While not many pure small forwards get opportunities at the elite level these days, Pickett is the exception because of his traits that set him aside from most. At just 171cm and 71kg, he is never going to be a massive body inside 50, but his smarts come to the fore at ground level or when flying for a mark. His highlight reel will be one of the best from this draft crop, and while his versatility might be limited at the elite level, he is too good to pass up which is why he earned a National Draft night invite, indicating that clubs are considering him in that first round.

#31 Harrison Jones
Calder Cannons/Vic Metro | Key Position Utility
25/02/2001 | 196cm | 78kg

One of the most athletic talls in the draft crop when it comes to key position utilities, Jones offers plenty of tricks both on and off the field to clubs keen to secure a tall option that can develop nicely at the elite level. Having played as a key forward, key back and even through the ruck in season 2019, Jones averaged 12.4 disposals and 3.1 marks per game. Clunking a contested mark per game in 2019, Jones still has a way to go to build his strength even further, but with an elite endurance base, top vertical leap, sub-three second 20m sprint and among the best agility testers, Jones ticks most of the boxes when it comes to his athleticism. On the field he has to continue to build his consistency and just develop his overall game, but the way he has tracked he has developed at a rapid rate.

#30 Thomson Dow
Bendigo Pioneers/Vic Country | Midfielder/Forward
16/10/2001 | 184cm | 76kg

Another brother of a Carlton-listed player, Thomson Dow has a few unique traits that help him stand out from other midfielder/forwards in this draft crop. While he might only be the 184cm and 76kg, Dow is strong above his head, averaging more than a contested mark per game while drifting forward. His competitive nature to win the contested ball is a feature of his game, with Dow winning more than 51 per cent of his possessions at the coal face, while averaging the three clearances and 2.6 inside 50s per game. He is primarily a handball specialist out of congestion, and while he can hit the scoreboard – his one goal a game average speaks to this – he is at home in the middle of a stoppage. He finds a way to get out of trouble and bares similar traits to his brother Paddy in his movement and touch of class. Dow still has to improve his consistency, but he is a value pick in the second round.

#29 Elijah Taylor
Perth/Western Australia | Medium Forward
01/05/2001 | 188cm | 77kg

One of the excitement machines of the 2019 AFL Draft crop, Taylor provides a spark inside 50 and has proven to be capable of also fulfilling a midfield role. He is one of those talents that will be judged differently depending on the club, with a potential first round, or mid second round pick used on the high upside forward. While his athletic testing numbers to not leap off the page, Taylor has that on-field athleticism that makes him a slippery customer to bring down or contain. While he is inconsistent at times he showed against the Allies that if given time and space he can break a game open, such as three goals in the second half to help the Sandgropers get over the line. Another player with strong X-factor and capable of turning a game, Taylor might be a long-term prospect, but one who will be worth the wait.

#28 Jeremy Sharp
East Fremantle/Western Australia | Midfielder/Defender
13/08/2001 | 189cm | 79kg

Dual All-Australians at Under 18s level do not grow on trees, but Sharp fits the bill having been a top-end prospect over the last 18 months with his run-and-carry and ability to break down opposition zones. His versatility allows him to play in any third of the ground, but is predominantly utilised off half-back or along a wing where his penetrating kick can best come to the fore. His kicking can still improve, because he is a run-and-gun player who can hit a target 50m away, or occasionally spray the ball out on the full. He also averaged just over 20 per cent contested possessions over the past three years, the lowest of the National Draft Combine invitees, which will be the question mark going to the next level. Like many on this list, Sharp still has a way to go to reach his full potential, but given his good size of 189cm, he is well on the road to that and is a player that will never die wondering when it comes to taking the game on and trying to set his team up forward or centre.

#27 Jay Rantall
GWV Rebels/Vic Country | Inside Midfielder
10/06/2001 | 185cm | 83kg

The former Australian basketballer progressed rapidly in season 2019, from a possible draft prospect, to a top 30 draft hope based around his elite endurance and ball-winning abilities in the GWV Rebels’ midfield. Playing on the inside, Rantall burnt opposition players into the ground with his running ability that saw him average 24.9 disposals per game at 45.6 per cent contested. While his kicking is still an area of improvement given his relative inexperience in the sport compared to others, he showed clean hands with 83.4 per cent of his handballs finding a teammate. Not testing as well as he showed on-field, Rantall has a great burst out of the stoppage to also work over an opponent, and can go forward and kick a goal as well – averaging almost a goal per game this year. With 6.5 tackles per game to accompany his 5.6 clearances and 3.3 inside 50s, Rantall is a tackling machine with good defensive attributes as well as offensive ones.

#26 Mitch O’Neill
Tasmania Devils/Allies | Small Utility
21/02/2001 | 176cm | 72kg

Similar to Sharp, it is amazing to think that a dual All-Australian could float under the radar, but a pesky ankle injury has restricted O’Neill over the past 12 months. He still put together a terrific national carnival which saw him earn All-Australian honours for the second time, in the midfield after making the bench in 2018. Throughout the four-game carnival, O’Neill averaged 20.3 disposals and 5.5 marks playing to his strengths as an outside runner with slick foot skills. He is not afraid to take the game on, and as he showed against Western Australia, sliced up the opposition defence with some penetrating bullets down the middle. At just 176cm and 72kg, O’Neill is a lightly built smaller player who is not overly defensively-orientated – just under two tackles per game – which are some of the knocks on him. But what he can do with ball-in-hand is very impressive and athletically he is solid, and can easily play a role up either end given his disposal and smarts.

#25 Cooper Stephens
Geelong Falcons/Vic Country | Inside Midfielder
17/01/2001 | 188cm | 83kg

Having missed the majority of the season due to a broken leg, Stephens still remains in contention for a top 25 selection given his bottom-age year form. A co-captain at Geelong Falcons, Stephens impressed in the first couple of games before going down early in the third match this season. At 188cm and 83kg, Stephens is readymade once he can build his match fitness and has elite endurance that will help him get there quicker than most that have missed a season of football. His leadership skills are among the best in the draft crop and despite knowing he would miss the entire Under-18 Championships, Stephens was named vice-captain of Vic Country, assisting in an off-field role. In terms of his strengths, Stephens is a penetrating kick who can play multiple roles, but is best suited to a congested situation where he can quickly fire out handballs to teammates, or extract the ball from a stoppage. With 62.5 per cent of his possessions won at the coal face, Stephens is no stranger to the contest and has an appetite for clearances and defensive pressure.

#24 Cam Taheny
Norwood/South Australia | Medium Forward
03/08/2001 | 185cm | 80kg

An exciting forward who like many other forwards this year has had inconsistency throughout the season, Taheny is a natural leader who has some elite traits that give clubs an idea he will develop nicely going forward. His low endurance base is a reason behind his inconsistency, but his damage in the air or ground level is very high, having played for Norwood’s League and Reserves sides this year – winning a flag with the latter. He has a penetrating kick, high goal sense and a knack for creating something out of nothing, Taheny is a player who might take a while to develop, but could be an exciting prospect to watch over the next few years, with the likely second round selection having plenty of tricks in the forward half.

#23 Dylan Williams
Oakleigh Chargers | Medium Forward
01/07/2001 | 186cm | 81kg

Similar to Taheny, Williams is a contested marking medium forward with a penetrating kick and an eye for the spectacular. Battling injuries at different points throughout the year and eventually putting the feet up after a match-winning effort against Eastern Ranges in July due to stress fractures in his back, Williams has high upside. He was one of the Chargers’ best in the finals series last year as a bottom-ager, almost being unstoppable as that one-on-one leading forward who could leap high and pull down a contested grab, or win the ball at ground level and kick an impossible goal. While his inconsistency has seen Williams drift down the order, he has enough in his game to suggest he could develop into one of the top-end prospects of this draft with time.

#22 Jackson Mead
WWT Eagles/South Australia | Balanced Midfielder
30/09/2001 | 183cm | 83kg

The son of Port Adelaide’s inaugural best and fairest winner Darren, Mead is a player who can play a multitude of roles, both on the inside or outside. While athletically Mead is not in the top echelon of players, he is built strongly for his age and capable of fending off opponents in midfield. He played three games for the Eagles’ League side, but looked most at home in the Reserves side while he continued to develop, playing 11 matches and averaging 20.2 disposals, 3.3 marks, 3.4 clearances and 4.2 inside 50s at the level. He won 42.7 per cent of his disposals in a contest and while his kicking at times could improve, he has a penetrating kick through midfield and can hit targets down the field from long range. Overall, Mead has plenty of promising traits and provides a balanced approach to his football.

#21 Miles Bergman
Sandringham Dragons/Vic Metro | Mid/Forward
18/010/2001 | 189cm | 83kg

The final player just outside the top 20 is the exciting medium forward in Miles Bergman, who grew to 189cm to be come that third tall option at half-forward. He is strong overhead, averaging one contested mark per game from his 5.3 average, while also averaging 14.0 disposals and 3.8 inside 50s. At times he could be inconsistent, but when he was up and about, Bergman showed some terrific signs playing inside 50. He had to overcome early injury concerns and battled away to build form in the second half of the season. While his field kicking could improve, Bergman constantly looked like applying scoreboard pressure, averaging almost a goal and behind per game, and also providing that defensive pressure with 4.3 tackles. His elite running vertical leap of 90cm, coupled with his sub-three second 20m sprint means he is capable of hurting the opposition both in the air or at ground level.

Draft Central Power Rankings: October 2019

AFTER a massive 2018 which saw so many talented players realise their dreams, we turn our attention to the 2019 AFL Draft crop. In the October edition of our monthly Power Rankings which is posted on the first Monday of every month, we extend out to the top 35 players at this stage of the year. So much can change over the next month, but the order is firming as combines are completed around the country. Take note that the order is based purely on opinion and ability, not on any AFL club lists or needs.

#1 Matt Rowell

Oakleigh Chargers/Vic Metro | Inside Midfielder
01/07/2001 | 178cm | 75kg

Easily the most consistent player in the 2019 draft crop, having barely ever played a bad game. The inside midfielder is a tackling machine, averaging double-figure tackles at NAB League Boys level, while also racking up a massive 7.3 clearances per game. What is remarkable about Rowell is not only his ability to win the ball, but his ability to bring teammates into the game. Rowell is always looking to provide possession to a teammate in a better position, but when he needs to step up, Rowell is more than capable of finishing on his own. When at forward stoppages, Rowell has a nous of breaking away and snapping off his left as he did twice against Casey Demons on the MCG. There are plenty of candidates to the number one pick this year, but Rowell looks the 2019 equivalent of Sam Walsh – consistent across the board and just ticks all the boxes. He will spend the year playing school footy outside his National Under 18 Championships commitments before returning to the Chargers’ for their finals campaign.

September Ranking: #1

Last month: Had a terrific finals series for Oakleigh Chargers and capped off what was a massive, yet still unsurprising top-age year with a 44-disposal and 11-clearance NAB League Grand Final to lead the Chargers to a premiership. It was his second best on ground in the competition’s ultimate decider despite losing 12 months prior, but this year there was more cause for celebration, just like when he capped off the season with a Best and Fairest victory for the Chargers off just seven games.

#2 Noah Anderson

Oakleigh Chargers/Vic Metro | Inside Midfielder/Forward
17/02/2001 | 190cm | 87kg

In what was thought to be an anomaly last year with Henley High pairing Jack Lukosius and Izak Rankine touted as potential pick one and two, Anderson and Rowell both attend Carey Grammar, making it a daunting combo for any other APS school. Anderson is different to Rowell in the sense he is taller, has the ability to break open a game in a quarter, and has a booming kick that easily travels greater than 50 metres. He has enjoyed a consistent start to the year and has not done too much wrong, with his field kicking an area he could improve on at times. When inside the forward half, Anderson is one of the most damaging prospects in the draft crop, and expect him to have an impact around goals at the National Under 18 Championships for Vic Metro. His game-breaking ability is as good as anyone’s in the draft crop.

September Ranking: #2

Last month: Became a premiership player with the Chargers this year and while he did not hit the scoreboard in two of his finals, still showed great strength on the inside, then dominated the preliminary final win over Sandringham Dragons, slotting three goals from 23 touches and four marks.

#3 Caleb Serong

Gippsland Power/Vic Country | Small Forward/Midfielder
09/02/2001 | 178cm | 83kg

A tireless worker, Serong missed the opening game of the NAB League season and has been working his way back into the year finding plenty of the ball around the ground. For a smaller player, Serong never takes a backwards step and seems to find the ball in all three areas of the ground, having plenty of influence around the stoppages, particularly in the forward half. He is very strong overhead and brings his teammates into the game. Both he and close mate, Sam Flanders lead the Gippsland Power charge for draftees in what should be a big year for them. Will miss most of the NAB League season due to school and state commitments, but will be a welcome return come finals time.

September Ranking: #3

Last month: Did all he could across the finals series for Gippsland, with the Power ultimately falling short once again this year. In the Power’s three finals, he averaged more than 25 touches per game, as well as four marks, five tackles, five inside 50s and booted three goals.

#4 Hayden Young

Dandenong Stingrays/Vic Country | General Defender/Inside Midfielder
11/04/2001 | 188cm | 82kg

One of the prime movers last season and a player who has the potential to be a deadly half-back. He has elite kicking skills coming out of defence, aided by the fact he has a penetrating kick that can clear 50m with ease. He just gets to the right positions and pushes up the ground where he takes a number of intercept marks. He will contest any marking contest regardless of opponent, and is a composed user in defence. He was tried in the middle early in the season, but his greatest influence is in the back half. After an okay start to the year without being anything dazzling, Young reminded everyone of his talent on the MCG, starring alongside Rowell and Anderson, taking a number of crucial intercept marks and setting up scoring plays. A hard edge with terrific kicking skills, Young is one to certainly keep in mind for Pick 1.

September Ranking: #4

Last month: Has not played since the last Power Rankings, but tested well at the National Draft Combine, beating his previous agility record in the pre-season but clocking a sub-eight second agility test last week.

#5 Lachlan Ash

Murray Bushrangers/Vic Country | General Defender
21/06/2001 | 186cm | 80kg

Along with Young, Ash is the other standout Country prospect in defence. The Murray Bushrangers runner has few flaws to his game, owning the defensive 50 with a massive amount of intercept marks and rebounds, while slicing up opposition zones with his elite kicking ability. He is a player that just catches the eye, gets himself into the right positions, and can set up teammates around the ground or in attack. He has hardly put a foot wrong this season, and while his performance on the MCG had its ups and downs, his NAB League form is not to be questioned. The noticeable advantage with Ash compared to a lot of half-backs is he can win his own ball, and while he might only win a third of his possessions in a contest, he is comparably low with handball receives, almost winning more touches from marking than from handballs. If he and Young both play off half-back at the National Under 18 Championships, expect Country to have plenty of run and penetration.

September Ranking: #5

Last month: Has not played, but showed off his athletic capabilities at the National Draft Combine, doing well across the board including a sub-three second 20-metre sprint which would have not come as a surprise, but still showed what he is capable of from half-back.

#6 Sam Flanders

Gippsland Power/Vic Country | Inside Midfielder/Forward
24/07/2001 | 182cm | 81kg

After playing as a damaging forward in 2018, Flanders has moved into the midfield this season and been one of the more prolific extractors. While it could be argued his greatest impact is around goals – where he seems to kick the impossible at times – he also has the nous in the midfield to find the ball at stoppages and kick long inside 50, or sweep the handball out to a running teammate. Gippsland has missed his influence and strength in attack, but he has added another dimension to a deep Power midfield. Flanders is a player who will divide draft watchers as he could be top five, or later first round depending on what you look at. He plays taller than his 182cm, and is strong overhead or at ground level. Another top-end Country prospect to watch this year.

September Ranking: #6

Last month: Since his qualifying final demolition of four goals in 10 minutes, Flanders had two very different games, with a quiet match against the Western Jets in the semi-final racking up just 18 touches and a goal – though seven tackles – before doing well against Eastern Ranges in the preliminary final despite the loss, with 27 disposals, five tackles and four inside 50s.

#7 Tom Green

GWS GIANTS Academy/Allies | Inside Midfielder
23/01/2001 | 188cm | 85kg

The inside hard nut has drawn comparisons to Patrick Cripps in the way he excels at the contested ball, bullying his way to a truckload of possessions and clearances. He has clean and quick hands on the inside and a long kick, while having no issues whatsoever finding the pill. In the opening few NAB League games, Green racked up an average of 33 disposals and 10.25 clearances, still going at more than 60 per cent efficiency despite running at greater than 60 per cent contested. Across the board he is very consistent – similar to Cripps – in order to have an influence on the contest. He will be the top pure tall inside midfielder in the draft, with adding more scoreboard pressure the key between Green and the likes of Rowell and Anderson.

September Ranking: #7

Last month: Has missed the past month with a knee injury.

#8 Dylan Stephens

Norwood/South Australia | Balanced Midfielder
08/01/2001 | 182cm | 70kg

Stephens is another lightly built midfielder who despite being just 70kg has forced his way into the SANFL League side for Norwood already in season 2019. Given the Redlegs’ tendancy to restrict kids from being exposed at the top level – see Luke Valente last year – it is a credit to Stephens – and teammate Taheny, to already earn their stripes. He has held his own too, admitedly playing a very outside game, but with many bigger bodies at the Redlegs, Stephens has terrific skills and moves well in transition, able to win the ball in midfield, take off and kick perfectly inside 50. He still has to add bulk to his frame, but he showed when taking on his peers he is capable of playing an inside role as well. Expect him to be the prime mover for South Australia at the Under 18 Championships and raise his stocks with a big couple of months.

September Ranking: #8

Last month: After his League side was eliminated from the SANFL premiership race, Stephens was brought into the Redlegs’ Reserves Grand Final side where he had 26 disposals, three marks, five clearances, five tackles, two inside 50s and three rebounds on his way to a premiership medal. He also tested strongly across the board at the National Draft Combine.

#9 Brodie Kemp

Bendigo Pioneers/Vic Country | Tall Utility
01/05/2001 | 192cm | 82kg

Kemp is a player that will be looked at as a long-term prospect, and one who could be moulded into nearly anything. At 192cm, he has played a hybrid role over the past few years, rotating between attack and midfield, and even some time in defence. He knows how to hit the scoreboard and has a long kick but could tidy it up when at full-speed. His ability to get to the outside and move in transition is a strength. He is a smooth mover who looks like an outside player, but wins the majority of his possessions at the coal face. Another player who will miss the majority of the NAB League season due to his school football commitments, but will be one to watch at the National Under 18 Championships.

September Ranking: #9

Last month: Unfortunately for Kemp, he went down with an Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) tear in July school game and missed the remainder of the season.

#10 Fischer McAsey

Sandringham Dragons/Vic Metro | Key Position Utility
11/04/2001 | 195cm | 86kg

McAsey is a key position defender who has played up the attacking end in previous years. He has found his place in the defence in 2019. and seems to be a settled player there not only doing well for Sandringham Dragons and at Caulfield Grammar, but stepping up for Vic Metro at the AFL Under 18 National Championships. He is considered one of the draft bolters this season, with not too many key position talls jumping up, McAsey is a player who is firmly putting his hand up as a top 10 prospect should his form continue, and he has plenty of traits to like. His intercept marking, athleticism and ball use by foot is very solid and does not have too many weaknesses across the board.

September Ranking: #10

Last month: Did not play after the first final, cited in a moon boot on semi-finals day for the NAB League. Still looms as the first key position player taken despite the injury ending his year.

#11 Luke Jackson

East Fremantle/Western Australia | Ruck
29/09/2001 | 197cm | 93kg

The athletic West Australian ruck picked Australian Rules over basketball last year despite donning the green and gold on the court. Jackson plays like an extra midfielder when moving around the ground and has been plying his trade at Colts level in the WAFL given the strength of ruck stocks at East Fremantle. Jackson looms as a potential first round pick, even though rucks are traditionally taken later. He would be viewed as a long-term prospect, and certainly if his two National Under 18 Championships games from 2018 are anything to go by, he has plenty of talent at his disposal. Clubs will like the fact he is not out of the contest once the ball hits ground level, and was solid against Casey Demons’ bigger-bodied rucks on the MCG. The standout ruck in the 2019 draft crop in a crop that does not have as many top-end talls as last year.

September Ranking: #11

Last month: Given East Fremantle Colts missed finals, Jackson has not been able to play since August but has enough runs on the board to give himself a first round chance.

#12 Will Gould

Glenelg/South Australia | Key Position Defender
14/01/2001 | 191cm | 98kg

The key defender is the player likely to be the big point of difference in the top-end of the rankings. At 191cm he is a tad undersized for a key position player, but he has the ability to play small or tall, and has been working on his tank to play midfield at times. He wins plenty of the ball at half-back and averages almost eight rebounds per game at League level for Glenelg – holding his own against bigger bodies and dropping into the hole with his game smarts reading the ball in flight well. He has leadership tendencies and captained the Australian Under 18s at the MCG against Casey Demons and will be a prime candidate for the South Australian job as well. Gould has put on seven kilograms since the championships last season, enabling him to take the more monster key forwards, and while he might still be undersized, he just competes and has a massive work rate which stands out each time he plays.

September Ranking: #12

Last month: Had a strong finish to the year for Glenelg in the finals series, taking home a premiership medallion after 18 disposals, four marks and eight rebounds in the Grand Final.

#13 Trent Rivers

East Fremantle/Western Australia | Balanced Midfielder
30/07/2001 | 189cm | 84kg

It is a good year for East Fremantle, with prospects basically growing on trees, and Rivers is another touted top 30 prospect along with Jeremy Sharp and Luke Jackson. Rivers is a natural-born leader who thrives on the contest and is as consistent as they come, racking up more than 20 disposals in most outings. He loves to tackle and put his body on the line, and is a crucial key to the midfield of Western Australia at the national championships. Unlike a lot of other top-end midfielders this year, Rivers has the size on him, standing at 189cm and 84kg, and readymade for senior football.

September Ranking: #13

Last month: Similar to Jackson, given East Fremantle Colts missed out on finals, Rivers has not played in the past month but still looms as one of the top couple of players to be picked from Western Australia.

#14 Trent Bianco

Oakleigh Chargers/Vic Metro | Outside Midfielder
20/01/2001 | 176cm | 70kg

Arguably quite underrated given his size and the ability of his highly touted Oakleigh teammates, Bianco is one of the best ball users in the draft crop this season. Like Lachlan Ash, Bianco rebounds off half-back and can go into the middle when required, a place he will no doubt spend a lot of time this season having wrapped up his Year 12 studies last year. The co-captain of the Oakleigh Chargers is an outside ball user, and finding more contested ball could be an area he looks to in season 2019, but his skills are good enough that he could easily play as that outside user, especially considering his size. A versatile player, expect Bianco to be one of the Morrish Medal contenders this season when he is not running around for Vic Metro. He had a massive game against Tasmania Devils, racking up 42 disposals, although he did have seven clangers on the day. Keeps rising and despite being smaller, just finds the ball and uses it well more often than not.

September Ranking: #14

Last month: Captained his side to a premiership in the NAB League after a terrific finals series. After being tightly held early, Bianco got off the chain to finish with 29 touches, 10 marks and six inside 50s. This followed on from his 27 touches, six marks and five inside 50s in the preliminary final win over the Dragons.

#15 Finn Maginness

Sandringham Dragons/Vic Metro | Balanced Midfielder
23/02/2001 | 187cm | 80kg

The underrated midfielder missed out on being included in the State Victorian Metro Academy, but has not let that get him down, performing strongly across the NAB League and school seasons, and working his way up the boards with some strong performances against the best players around the country. He has a nice sidestep that can get him out of trouble and wins a lot of the ball in close, with a few areas to iron out such as his kicking, but he has some great developing traits and plenty of future development. Most importantly, he can win the ball on the inside and extract it out, but can also play an outside role too.

September Ranking: #17

Last month: After a massive 32-disposal game which included a goal against Calder Cannons, Maginnes was quiet in the Dragons’ preliminary final loss to Oakleigh, amassing just 13 touches. He competed strongly in both the 20-metre sprint (2.957 seconds) and the yo-yo test (21.4 level) to finish top 10 and show off his blend of endurance and speed.

#16 Will Day

West Adelaide/South Australia | General Defender
17/01/2001 | 187cm | 70kg

The underrated South Australian utility has been one of the big improvers this season, showing off some nice signs at school football and then South Australia at the AFL Under 18 National Championships. Like Weightman, Day has been on the periphery of our Power Rankings the past two months, and after some solid performances at the national carnival, makes the list for July. Day has shown signs similar to last year’s bolter, Jez McLennan who had a good carnival and emerged as a top 30 prospect with nice foot skills and composure. Day can kick on either side of his body and is a good size at 187cm despite still being very light at 70kg.

September Ranking: #23

Last month: Finished off the finals series in the Under 18s side with 22 disposals, nine rebounds and four clearances in a losing West Adelaide team at the preliminary finals stage. His consistency across the year and lethal kicking skills were on show and have been real standouts this year. He also finished top 15 in the running vertical leap with a score of 83cm.

#17 Miles Bergman

Sandringham Dragons/Vic Metro | Midfielder/Forward
18/10/2001 | 188cm | 77kg

A talented mid/forward, Bergman is strong overhead and can have an impact anywhere inside 50 with a penetrating kick and eye for goals. Bergman is not a massive disposal winner, but can win a game off his own boot. He still has areas of consistency to work on, but in terms of medium forwards, Bergman has been one of the more consistent ones this year, and looms as a potential first round selection.

September Ranking: #15

Last month: Had a quiet semi-final against Calder Cannons with just four touches for the day, before being okay in Sandringham’s heavy loss to Oakleigh in the preliminary final, finishing with 14 touches, five marks, five tackles and a goal. At the National Draft Combine, Bergman topped the vertical jump with 77cm and came second in the running vertical jump with a massive 90cm.

#18 Liam Henry

Claremont/Western Australia | Outside Midfielder/Forward
28/08/2001 | 179cm | 67kg

A member of Fremantle’s Next Generation Academy, Henry is another lightly built midfielder who can go forward and impact a game inside 50. Henry has nice skills and slick athletic traits that help him work his way out of congestion while making good decisions with ball-in-hand. He does need to find a bit more of the football at times which is the next step, but he is a player who will rarely waste a possession and one who Fremantle fans would be excited to have on their list. Still has scope to develop further, and grow into his body at just 67kg and another sub-180cm midfielder. One who would be keen to finish off the year strongly – although perhaps Fremantle would prefer he kept it in check. A highly talented player.

September Ranking: #17

Last month: Unfortunately dislocated his knee in a school football match and has not returned since his impressive 26-disposal, six-mark, two-goal game in Round 14.

#19 Deven Robertson

Perth/Western Australia | Balanced Midfielder
30/06/2001 | 182cm | 80kg

The massive ball-winning midfielder from Western Australia was been a dominant force in the AFL Under 18 National Championships after injury last year, and has boosted his draft ranking after the carnival. He still has areas to tidy up such as kicking under pressure, but would stake a case of the most consistent player in the draft crop and you know exactly what you are going to get from him.

September ranking: #26

Last month: Robertson is done for the year, needing a shoulder reconstruction after dislocating his shoulder in the final championships game. One who has not lost out due to missing out on games with his consistency in big games the reason for his rise as others fall around him.

#20 Josh Worrell

Sandringham Dragons/Vic Metro | Key Position Utility
11/04/2001 | 193cm | 78kg

The Sandringham Dragons defender has had an impressive past few weeks after not having to do too much in the Dragons’ obliteration of Calder in the opening round of the NAB League season. On the MCG against Casey Demons, Worrell stood tall in defence, showing an ability to remain calm under pressure and use the ball well. At 193cm, Worrell will be a player that clubs look at differently, being that few cms smaller than the current trend for key position defenders, which is fine considering Worrell’s ability to provide run and carry out of defence. He is still lightly built, but he is strong overhead and has the potential to develop into a tall midfielder or one who roams off half-back and sets up attacking plays. A player who will spend the season at Haileybury College.

September Ranking: #20

Last month: His season is over after a shoulder injury sidelined him for the remainder of the 2019 season.

#21 Mitch O'Neill

Tasmania Devils/Allies | Outside Midfielder
21/02/2001 | 178cm | 69kg

The top Tasmanian prospect was an All-Australian in his bottom-age year, and has a nice blend of inside and outside capabilities. Given his lightly built frame, expect O’Neill to stick to the outside during the National Under 18 Championships, but he can win his own ball at the same time. He reads the taps well and is able to spread to the outside, pumping the ball inside 50 to set up scoring chains. Having spent time in defence last year, O’Neill has moved into the midfield and found just as much of the ball, and is a crucial ball user on the outside. He will be the player most analysed by opposition sides when playing Tasmania Devils in the NAB League, and O’Neill will enjoy added freedom at the National Under 18 Championships for the Allies.

September Ranking: #18

Last month: Has not played in the past couple of months after injury and his side not making the NAB League finals series.

#22 Cameron Taheny

Norwood/South Australia | General Forward
03/08/2001 | 184cm | 80kg

The medium forward is an excitement machine who lit up the National Under 16 Championships in 2017. He continued that form in his bottom-age year for Norwood, booting six goals in a game last year to show off his talents inside 50. Similar to Dylan Williams, Taheny has his ups and downs, but his best is as good as anyone else’s in the draft crop. A good season could propel him into the top half of the first round, and he is a player who could turn a match on its head which will be crucial for South Australia at the National Under 18 Championships. Has already broken into the League side for Norwood and booted three goals on debut. One to watch through the year as someone who could rise.

September Ranking: #22

Last month: After missing the first couple of finals, Taheny returned to Norwood for the Reserves’ Grand Final where he looked fresh, booting four goals from eight disposals in a big game up forward to help the Redlegs win the flag in the competition.

#23 Jackson Mead

WWT Eagles/South Australia | Balanced Midfielder
30/09/2001 | 183cm | 83kg

The son of Port Adelaide inaugural Best and Fairest winner, Darren has made a promising start to the 2019 SANFL season, starting in the Reserves and impressing, showing that a League debut would be in the not-too-distint future. Mead will team up with Stephens at the National Under 18 Championships to lead the side through his penetrating kick and good skills, spreading around and using the ball well forward of centre. Not as prolific a ball winner as some others, Mead has good smarts and does not waste too many disposals. Importantly, Mead hits the scoreboard as a midfielder, and can win his own ball on the inside when required.

September Ranking: #19

Last month: Had a couple of impressive finals before a quieter 14-disposal game in the SANFL Reserves Grand Final where his Eagles’ side went down to Norwood in the decider. A bit up and down at times, but has shown nice signs throughout the year.

#24 Dylan Williams

Oakleigh Chargers/Vic Metro | General Utility
01/07/2001 | 185cm | 81kg

After having a terrific second half of the year playing as a medium forward, Williams has spent time mixed between attack and defence in season 2019. He is definitely more suited to attack where he has a high vertical leap and is dangerous around goals. He is as strong overhead as anyone and certainly impressive for a player of his size. Not a huge ball winner, Williams just needs to find four quarter consistency this season as he is the player that can boot four goals in a term and take the game away from the opposition. He also has terrific skills, and hits three out of his four targets despite finding half his possessions in a contest. When at stoppages, Williams is more than capable of winning clearances as he showed against Dandenong, bursting away and pumping the ball long. One area of improvement is his defensive work, which is why he has been played in defence at times to build that area of his game. In the wet at Craigieburn against Calder Cannons in Round 2, Williams had eight out of 12 disposals effective, running at a much higher efficiency than his teammates. Does not have APS school commitments so will play the full year at NAB League Boys level with the Chargers, co-captaining the side with Trent Bianco.

September Ranking: #21

Last month: Has not played in the past two months with back stress fractures ending his year.

#25 Cooper Stephens

Geelong Falcons/Vic Country | Inside Midfielder
17/01/2001 | 188cm | 83kg

Geelong Falcons midfielder unfortunately fractured his fibula in in Round 3. Stephens is a huge loss for Vic Country as Falcons Talent Manager Mick Turner said he would not take part in the National Under 18 Championships next month. Stephens is a neat user of the ball, recording 65 per cent by foot, and in the two games before his injury, Stephens averaged 26 disposals, 3.5 marks, 4.0 clearances and ran at more than 60 per cent contested possessions.

September Ranking: #25

Last month: Did not get on the park since Round 3 due to his long-term injury but was cherry ripe for the National Draft Combine Testing, finishing as the equal winner in the yo-yo test with a 21.8, as well as a top 15 finish in the running vertical leap with 83cm.

#26 Connor Budarick

Gold Coast SUNS Academy/Allies | General Utility
06/04/2001 | 176cm | 70kg

The Gold Coast SUNS Academy player could draw comparisons to Ned McHenry in both his stature and defensive pressure. Budarick played as a forward last year, and has spent more time in the midfield in 2019, but will likely rotate between both at the National Under 18 Championships. Weighing in at about 70kg, Budarick is outside leaning when in the midfield and just has little bursts where he wins the football. In the exhibition match against Casey Demons, Budarick played in defence and held his own back there, but his best comes forward of centre where he lays an average of seven tackles per game, and forces turnovers close to goal. He runs hard between the arcs and will likely cost Gold Coast a top 30 pick based on his skills and work rate.

August Ranking: #24

Last month: Did not play finals this year given the SUNS missed the NEAFL post-season series, but impressed at the National Draft Combine with a 21.6 yo-yo test and an 8.242 agility test. A free hit for Gold Coast with the new draft concessions and a value one at that.

#27 Jeremy Sharp

East Fremantle/Western Australia | Outside Midfielder
13/08/2001 | 187cm | 79kg

One of a number of East Fremantle potential draftees, Sharp is a skilled midfielder who is capable of playing off half-back as well as along the wing. He is not a massive ball winner, but he is a terrific kick of the footy and is a run-and-carry player. Along with Jackson, Sharp is a potential top 10 player who is a good size at 187cm and has added some bulk to his frame over the off-season. He is one of just three players who earned All-Australian honours as a bottom-ager last season following a magnificent Under 18 Championships. Sharp is one of those players you want the ball in their hands going forward as he will likely pinpoint a target inside 50. One to watch if he can go to another level at his top-age championships.

September Ranking: #27

Last month: Did not play finals for East Fremantle given the Sharks missed out, but had a 2.966 20-metre sprint and 21.3 yo-yo test at the National Draft Combine.

#28 Cody Weightman

Dandenong Stingrays/Vic Country | General Forward
15/01/2001 | 177cm | 73kg

For the first two months of our Power Rankings, the electric small forward has been on the periphery of making it, and after a terrific national carnival – where he booted four goals in two of his three games – Weightman makes it into the Power Rankings in July. He has a high ceiling given he can create goals out of nothing and score from general play or set shots and has a powerful kicking action to boot. Just 177cm and 73kg, Weightman is another light prospect who has plenty of development left in him. Could be another player who lights up NAB League finals as he is a big game player.

September Ranking: #28

Last month: Given the Stingrays were knocked out in the first week of finals, Weightman has not played NAB League in the past month, but tested well in the vertical jump at the National Draft Combine with 69cm in the standing and 83cm in the running.

#29 Elijah Taylor

Perth/Western Australia | General Forward
01/05/2001 | 185cm | 75kg

Taylor has X-factor and plenty of scope for the future as a medium forward. He always looks damaging when in possession and a worry for opposition defenders when not in possession. He is still raw compared to other forwards, but his ceiling is quite high and no doubt clubs will keep him on their radar. He has been a talented player for some time, but he has started to string together impressive performances to put his name into top 30 calculations. A key player for Perth in the WAFL and stepped up during the AFL Under-18 National Championships.

September Ranking: #30

Last month: Has not played in the past month since his two goals at Reserves level, but blew away draft watchers with a 8.005-second agility test at the National Draft Combine – second overall at the combine behind Hayden Young.

#30 Harry Schoenberg

Woodville-West Torrens/South Australia | Balanced Midfielder
21/02/2001 | 180cm | 78kg

The South Australian midfielder surprised a lot of people on his way to his state’s Most Valuable Player (MVP) award at the National Under-18 Championships. He throughly deserved it with the second most disposals behind overall MVP winner Deven Robertson, Schoenberg was crucial on the inside, while being able to go outside as well. He still has areas to work on, but he has a nice balance and is consistent as they come, playing at both Under-18 and Reserves level in the SANFL for Woodville-West Torrens.

September Ranking: #N/A

Last month: After starting the year in the Under 18s, his consistency earned him a place in the Eagles’ Reserves side and he stayed there ever since, including the finals series in the past month. While the Eagles ultimately went down in the decider, Schoenberg had 20 disposals, three marks, six clearances and six tackles in the big game. He averaged 22 disposals and six clearances across his three finals to really step up against senior players.

#31 Thomson Dow

Bendigo Pioneers/Vic Country | Balanced Midfielder
16/10/2001 | 183cm | 72kg

The brother of Carlton’s Paddy did a good job of forging his own path this season, splitting his time between school football, NAB League and Under-18 Championships. In his five games for the Pioneers, Dow averaged 21.6 disposals, 4.4 marks and 3.0 clearances, spending time between midfield and forward. He provided a target up forward as he needed to buildup his endurance in season 2019, but has some nice athletic traits such as his agility to get out of stoppages. Still a raw prospect, he has always been in the top half of the draft calculations.

September Ranking: #N/A

Last month: Did not end up playing finals after the Pioneers were eliminated in the Wildcard Round. At the National Draft Combine, Dow ranked third overall in the agility test with a time of 8.061 seconds.

#32 Harrison Jones

Calder Cannons/Vic Metro | Key Position Utility
25/02/2001 | 194cm | 75kg

The Calder Cannons and Vic Metro key position utility has played in all thirds of the ground, with the forward half seemingly his most effective role, particularly roaming further up the ground. He spent time assisting in the ruck despite being 194cm, with his leap able to match well against taller opponents. He still has plenty of development left in him, and it would not be a surprise to see a club take a chance inside the top 20 given the lack of quality talls in the 2019 draft.

September Ranking: #N/A

Last month: Jones’ year ended in the semi-finals with a loss to Sandringham Dragons, with the tall utility picking up 15 touches and laying five tackles, backing up his 11 and eight the week before. He tested well across the board at the National Draft Combine last week with running vertical jump (83cm), 20m sprint (2.963 seconds) and yo-yo test (21.4) giving him a great all-round mix of athleticism.

#33 Darcy Cassar

Western Jets/Vic Metro | Medium Utility
31/07/2001 | 183cm | 79kg

As a bottom-ager last year, Cassar thrived as a half-forward/wing who would move the ball in transition and show power in his running to be able to impact for his side going inside 50. He is capable of hitting the scoreboard while playing in the forward half, but as he has shown so far in season 2019, he is just as adaptable in defence. Cassar has spent the season in the backline for the Western Jets, averaging a massive 28.2 disposals, 6.8 marks and 6.9 rebounds per game. He has added that element to his game, and expect him to be a versatile player at the national championships for Vic Metro, playing up whichever end is required of him, while also being able to play in the midfield.

September Ranking: #N/A

Last month: The Jets were eliminated in the semi-finals by Gippsland Power, with Cassar picking up the 17 disposals and three marks in that game after a quiet game against Northern Knights in the elimination final where he had 11 touches and just the one rebound. His form prior to that was quite good, but just showed the consistency to iron out at the next level.

#34 Sam De Koning

Dandenong Stingrays/Vic Country | Key Position Utility
26/02/2001 | 200cm | 85kg

De Koning enjoyed a strong Under-18 National Championships, named All-Australian at full-back after a strong carnival for Vic Country. His form at NAB League level was inconsistent at times, though he can play up either end and even through the ruck. His best position appears to be in defence however, with his intercept marking, positioning and reading of the play top notch. He looks likely to be taken in the first half of the draft with talls at a premium this year and he is a versatile one at that.

September Ranking: #N/A

Last month: Has not played since the Stingrays were eliminated in the elimination final against Calder, where he had just the seven touches and two marks.

#35 Fraser Phillips

Gippsland Power/Vic Country | General Forward
15/05/2001 | 186cm | 71kg

A talented medium forward with high upside, Phillips is a player who can do the impossible inside 50, but like many forwards, struggle with consistency. At his best, Phillips can kick multiple goals off limited possessions, and his season with Gippsland Power has been steadily improving after a slow start. He is great overhead and works hard to maintain an impact even when he is not able to do so closer to goal. Having featured in the Power Rankings earlier in the year, Phillips is still around the mark because of that high ceiling he could reach with strong development.

September Ranking: #N/A

Last month: Gippsland Power made it through to a preliminary final, with Phillips averaging 12 disposals. four marks, four tackles, three inside 50s and booting four goals in his three finals. His year was consistent hitting the scoreboard in all but two of his games, including bags of five and four goals, to finish with 28 majors from 15 games.

Others in contention

Noah Cumberland (Brisbane Lions Academy/Queensland)
Kysaiah Pickett (Woodville-West Torrens/South Australia)
Cooper Sharman (Oakleigh Chargers/Vic Metro)
Trey Ruscoe (East Fremantle/Western Australia)
Jay Rantall (GWV Rebels/Vic Country)
Jack Mahony (Sandringham Dragons/Vic Metro)
Sam Philp (Northern Knights/Vic Metro)
Liam Delahunty (GWS GIANTS Academy/NSW-ACT)

Next month… The final edition of Power Rankings. A top 50 released with 50-26 followed by 25-1.

Draft Central Power Rankings: September 2019

AFTER a massive 2018 which saw so many talented players realise their dreams, we turn our attention to the 2019 AFL Draft crop. In the fourth edition of our monthly Power Rankings which is posted on the first Monday of every month, we have compiled our top 30 players at this stage of the year. So much can change over the next few months, but the order is firming as combines around the country close near. Take note that the order is based purely on opinion and ability, not on any AFL club lists or needs.

We will be following up with ‘Ones to Watch’ in a separate piece later this week.

#1 Matt Rowell

Oakleigh Chargers/Vic Metro | Inside Midfielder
01/07/2001 | 178cm | 75kg

Easily the most consistent player in the 2019 draft crop, having barely ever played a bad game. The inside midfielder is a tackling machine, averaging double-figure tackles at NAB League Boys level, while also racking up a massive 7.3 clearances per game. What is remarkable about Rowell is not only his ability to win the ball, but his ability to bring teammates into the game. Rowell is always looking to provide possession to a teammate in a better position, but when he needs to step up, Rowell is more than capable of finishing on his own. When at forward stoppages, Rowell has a nous of breaking away and snapping off his left as he did twice against Casey Demons on the MCG. There are plenty of candidates to the number one pick this year, but Rowell looks the 2019 equivalent of Sam Walsh – consistent across the board and just ticks all the boxes. He will spend the year playing school footy outside his National Under 18 Championships commitments before returning to the Chargers’ for their finals campaign.

August Ranking: #1

Last month: Returned to the NAB League Boys with a bang collecting a whopping 34 disposals, three marks, 10 clearances, six inside 50s and seven tackles in a huge effort for Oakleigh Chargers to get over the line against Sandringham Dragons in the final round of the season. Was tightly guarded in Oakleigh’s qualifying final win over Gippsland but was a key reason the Chargers got home , picking up 29 disposals, four rebounds and laying eight tackles.

#2 Noah Anderson

Oakleigh Chargers/Vic Metro | Inside Midfielder/Forward
17/02/2001 | 190cm | 87kg

In what was thought to be an anomaly last year with Henley High pairing Jack Lukosius and Izak Rankine touted as potential pick one and two, Anderson and Rowell both attend Carey Grammar, making it a daunting combo for any other APS school. Anderson is different to Rowell in the sense he is taller, has the ability to break open a game in a quarter, and has a booming kick that easily travels greater than 50 metres. He has enjoyed a consistent start to the year and has not done too much wrong, with his field kicking an area he could improve on at times. When inside the forward half, Anderson is one of the most damaging prospects in the draft crop, and expect him to have an impact around goals at the National Under 18 Championships for Vic Metro. His game-breaking ability is as good as anyone’s in the draft crop.

August Ranking: #2

Last month: Anderson was one of the crucial match winners upon return to the NAB League Boys, booting 3.2 from 24 disposals, three marks, eight inside 50s and four clearances, taking control in the final term for the Chargers to overrun the Sandringham Dragons in the final round of the season. Finished the first final against Gippsland with 29 touches, four tackles, three inside 50s and two rebounds in a strong effort despite not having his usual time and space.

#3 Caleb Serong

Gippsland Power/Vic Country | Small Forward/Midfielder
09/02/2001 | 178cm | 83kg

A tireless worker, Serong missed the opening game of the NAB League season and has been working his way back into the year finding plenty of the ball around the ground. For a smaller player, Serong never takes a backwards step and seems to find the ball in all three areas of the ground, having plenty of influence around the stoppages, particularly in the forward half. He is very strong overhead and brings his teammates into the game. Both he and close mate, Sam Flanders lead the Gippsland Power charge for draftees in what should be a big year for them. Will miss most of the NAB League season due to school and state commitments, but will be a welcome return come finals time.

August Ranking: #6

Last month: Rested for the final week of the NAB League Boys season after a hectic year that included school football, will attack finals fresh and be a key contributor for the Power in their bid for the flag. Got under the skin of some Oakleigh players in the Power’s narrow loss to the Chargers, putting together a strong 29-disposals, four-mark, five-tackle and seven-inside 50 performance.

#4 Hayden Young

Dandenong Stingrays/Vic Country | General Defender/Inside Midfielder
11/04/2001 | 188cm | 82kg

One of the prime movers last season and a player who has the potential to be a deadly half-back. He has elite kicking skills coming out of defence, aided by the fact he has a penetrating kick that can clear 50m with ease. He just gets to the right positions and pushes up the ground where he takes a number of intercept marks. He will contest any marking contest regardless of opponent, and is a composed user in defence. He was tried in the middle early in the season, but his greatest influence is in the back half. After an okay start to the year without being anything dazzling, Young reminded everyone of his talent on the MCG, starring alongside Rowell and Anderson, taking a number of crucial intercept marks and setting up scoring plays. A hard edge with terrific kicking skills, Young is one to certainly keep in mind for Pick 1.

August Ranking: #3

Last month: Put together a solid month with three 20-plus disposal games, and spending time forward against Geelong Falcons in between. Was crucial in Dandenong’s win over Murray in the Wildcard Round to advance through to the finals, picking up 24 touches, two marks, seven tackles, two inside 50s and two rebounds. Was okay without being outstanding in Dandenong’s elimination final loss to Calder, picking up 19 disposals, two marks and three tackles. Drops down only because the three close to him had huge games in do-or-die or finals matches.

#5 Lachlan Ash

Murray Bushrangers/Vic Country | General Defender
21/06/2001 | 186cm | 80kg

Along with Young, Ash is the other standout Country prospect in defence. The Murray Bushrangers runner has few flaws to his game, owning the defensive 50 with a massive amount of intercept marks and rebounds, while slicing up opposition zones with his elite kicking ability. He is a player that just catches the eye, gets himself into the right positions, and can set up teammates around the ground or in attack. He has hardly put a foot wrong this season, and while his performance on the MCG had its ups and downs, his NAB League form is not to be questioned. The noticeable advantage with Ash compared to a lot of half-backs is he can win his own ball, and while he might only win a third of his possessions in a contest, he is comparably low with handball receives, almost winning more touches from marking than from handballs. If he and Young both play off half-back at the National Under 18 Championships, expect Country to have plenty of run and penetration.

August Ranking: #4

Last month: Finished his competitive season with a best-on performance for Murray in the Bushrangers’ loss to Dandenong in Wildcard Round. The co-captain was massive around the ground with his drive and elite skills and decision making. He took four marks, laid six tackles and got it down at both ends with six rebounds and five inside 50s. He now returns to play with Shepparton in his home club’s finals series.

#6 Sam Flanders

Gippsland Power/Vic Country | Inside Midfielder/Forward
24/07/2001 | 182cm | 81kg

After playing as a damaging forward in 2018, Flanders has moved into the midfield this season and been one of the more prolific extractors. While it could be argued his greatest impact is around goals – where he seems to kick the impossible at times – he also has the nous in the midfield to find the ball at stoppages and kick long inside 50, or sweep the handball out to a running teammate. Gippsland has missed his influence and strength in attack, but he has added another dimension to a deep Power midfield. Flanders is a player who will divide draft watchers as he could be top five, or later first round depending on what you look at. He plays taller than his 182cm, and is strong overhead or at ground level. Another top-end Country prospect to watch this year.

August Ranking: #5

Last month: Had his lowest disposal game of the year with just 14 against the Pioneers in Round 17, but has been a mirror of consistency this season with all bar one previous game with more than 20 disposals, including 28 and a goal against the Devils in Round 14. Absolutely dominated the second quarter of the qualifying final against Oakleigh, racking up 12 touches and booting four goals on his way to 27 disposals, seven marks, seven tackles and four inside 50s.

#7 Tom Green

GWS GIANTS Academy/Allies | Inside Midfielder
23/01/2001 | 188cm | 85kg

The inside hard nut has drawn comparisons to Patrick Cripps in the way he excels at the contested ball, bullying his way to a truckload of possessions and clearances. He has clean and quick hands on the inside and a long kick, while having no issues whatsoever finding the pill. In the opening few NAB League games, Green racked up an average of 33 disposals and 10.25 clearances, still going at more than 60 per cent efficiency despite running at greater than 60 per cent contested. Across the board he is very consistent – similar to Cripps – in order to have an influence on the contest. He will be the top pure tall inside midfielder in the draft, with adding more scoreboard pressure the key between Green and the likes of Rowell and Anderson.

August Ranking: #7

Last month: Has missed the past month with a knee injury.

#8 Dylan Stephens

Norwood/South Australia | Balanced Midfielder
08/01/2001 | 182cm | 70kg

Stephens is another lightly built midfielder who despite being just 70kg has forced his way into the SANFL League side for Norwood already in season 2019. Given the Redlegs’ tendancy to restrict kids from being exposed at the top level – see Luke Valente last year – it is a credit to Stephens – and teammate Taheny, to already earn their stripes. He has held his own too, admitedly playing a very outside game, but with many bigger bodies at the Redlegs, Stephens has terrific skills and moves well in transition, able to win the ball in midfield, take off and kick perfectly inside 50. He still has to add bulk to his frame, but he showed when taking on his peers he is capable of playing an inside role as well. Expect him to be the prime mover for South Australia at the Under 18 Championships and raise his stocks with a big couple of months.

August Ranking: #9

Last month: Had held his spot in finalist Norwood’s League side and continues to be a solid contributor, averaging 18.1 touches, 4.5 marks, 4.7 tackles and 3.2 inside 50s per game. To end the regular season, Stephens recorded more than 20 disposals in three of his four matches. He then stepped up over the weekend for Norwood to keep their premiership dreams alive with a terrific goal to accompany his 14 touches, two marks, three tackles and two clearances.

#9 Brodie Kemp

Bendigo Pioneers/Vic Country | Tall Utility
01/05/2001 | 192cm | 82kg

Kemp is a player that will be looked at as a long-term prospect, and one who could be moulded into nearly anything. At 192cm, he has played a hybrid role over the past few years, rotating between attack and midfield, and even some time in defence. He knows how to hit the scoreboard and has a long kick but could tidy it up when at full-speed. His ability to get to the outside and move in transition is a strength. He is a smooth mover who looks like an outside player, but wins the majority of his possessions at the coal face. Another player who will miss the majority of the NAB League season due to his school football commitments, but will be one to watch at the National Under 18 Championships.

August Ranking: #8

Last month: Unfortunately for Kemp, he went down with an Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) tear in July school game and will miss the remainder of the season.

#10 Fischer McAsey

Sandringham Dragons/Vic Metro | Key Position Utility
11/04/2001 | 195cm | 86kg

McAsey is a key position defender who has played up the attacking end in previous years. He has found his place in the defence in 2019. and seems to be a settled player there not only doing well for Sandringham Dragons and at Caulfield Grammar, but stepping up for Vic Metro at the AFL Under 18 National Championships. He is considered one of the draft bolters this season, with not too many key position talls jumping up, McAsey is a player who is firmly putting his hand up as a top 10 prospect should his form continue, and he has plenty of traits to like. His intercept marking, athleticism and ball use by foot is very solid and does not have too many weaknesses across the board.

August Ranking: #10

Last month: Was quiet in Sandringham’s tight loss to Oakleigh failing to kick a goal, but backed up with a big 14 disposals, five marks and two goals in the Dragons’ massive 103-point thumping of Geelong Falcons in Wildcard Round. Had a quieter game playing down back against Eastern in the qualifying final. Glided through the air to take a number of intercept marks but also dropped a few, finishing with 11 touches, four marks and three tackles.

#11 Luke Jackson

East Fremantle/Western Australia | Ruck
29/09/2001 | 197cm | 93kg

The athletic West Australian ruck picked Australian Rules over basketball last year despite donning the green and gold on the court. Jackson plays like an extra midfielder when moving around the ground and has been plying his trade at Colts level in the WAFL given the strength of ruck stocks at East Fremantle. Jackson looms as a potential first round pick, even though rucks are traditionally taken later. He would be viewed as a long-term prospect, and certainly if his two National Under 18 Championships games from 2018 are anything to go by, he has plenty of talent at his disposal. Clubs will like the fact he is not out of the contest once the ball hits ground level, and was solid against Casey Demons’ bigger-bodied rucks on the MCG. The standout ruck in the 2019 draft crop in a crop that does not have as many top-end talls as last year.

July Ranking: #24

Last month: Continues to dominate the WAFL Colts, with three consecutive matches of 20-plus disposals and 27-plus hitouts, then went forward in the most recent game against Perth, booting two goals from 16 touches, four marks and 31 hitouts. Has risen back to where he was at the start of the year as others fall and his consistency remains the same.

#12 Will Gould

Glenelg/South Australia | Key Position Defender
14/01/2001 | 191cm | 98kg

The key defender is the player likely to be the big point of difference in the top-end of the rankings. At 191cm he is a tad undersized for a key position player, but he has the ability to play small or tall, and has been working on his tank to play midfield at times. He wins plenty of the ball at half-back and averages almost eight rebounds per game at League level for Glenelg – holding his own against bigger bodies and dropping into the hole with his game smarts reading the ball in flight well. He has leadership tendencies and captained the Australian Under 18s at the MCG against Casey Demons and will be a prime candidate for the South Australian job as well. Gould has put on seven kilograms since the championships last season, enabling him to take the more monster key forwards, and while he might still be undersized, he just competes and has a massive work rate which stands out each time he plays.

August Ranking: #12

Last month: Racked up a season-high 27 disposals in Glenelg’s loss to Sturt in Round 18 heading into finals, also having five marks and 10 rebounds and continuing to impress.

#13 Trent Rivers

East Fremantle/Western Australia | Balanced Midfielder
30/07/2001 | 189cm | 84kg

It is a good year for East Fremantle, with prospects basically growing on trees, and Rivers is another touted top 30 prospect along with Jeremy Sharp and Luke Jackson. Rivers is a natural-born leader who thrives on the contest and is as consistent as they come, racking up more than 20 disposals in most outings. He loves to tackle and put his body on the line, and is a crucial key to the midfield of Western Australia at the national championships. Unlike a lot of other top-end midfielders this year, Rivers has the size on him, standing at 189cm and 84kg, and readymade for senior football.

August Ranking: #16

Last month: Racked up a season-high 30 disposals in the final round of the regular season for the Colts, while laying seven tackles and booting 2.2 from six marks. Rivers has not dropped below 25 disposals in a remarkable display of consistency this season.

#14 Trent Bianco

Oakleigh Chargers/Vic Metro | Outside Midfielder
20/01/2001 | 176cm | 70kg

Arguably quite underrated given his size and the ability of his highly touted Oakleigh teammates, Bianco is one of the best ball users in the draft crop this season. Like Lachlan Ash, Bianco rebounds off half-back and can go into the middle when required, a place he will no doubt spend a lot of time this season having wrapped up his Year 12 studies last year. The co-captain of the Oakleigh Chargers is an outside ball user, and finding more contested ball could be an area he looks to in season 2019, but his skills are good enough that he could easily play as that outside user, especially considering his size. A versatile player, expect Bianco to be one of the Morrish Medal contenders this season when he is not running around for Vic Metro. He had a massive game against Tasmania Devils, racking up 42 disposals, although he did have seven clangers on the day. Keeps rising and despite being smaller, just finds the ball and uses it well more often than not.

August Ranking: #14

Last month: Picked up 28 disposals, five marks and six rebounds in a match-winning effort for the Chargers against the Dragons in the final round of the season, and while he did not have his usual influence in the first final, stepped up to kick the match-winning goal in the pouring rain to win the Chargers the match against Gippsland. He still finished with 24 touches, two marks, three tackles, three inside 50s and three rebounds.

#15 Miles Bergman

Sandringham Dragons/Vic Metro | Midfielder/Forward
18/10/2001 | 188cm | 77kg

The underrated midfielder missed out on being included in the State Victorian Metro Academy, but has not let that get him down, performing strongly across the NAB League and school seasons, and working his way up the boards with some strong performances against the best players around the country. He has a nice sidestep that can get him out of trouble and wins a lot of the ball in close, with a few areas to iron out such as his kicking, but he has some great developing traits and plenty of future development. Most importantly, he can win the ball on the inside and extract it out, but can also play an outside role too.

August Ranking: #N/A

Last month: Has had the biggest month of just about anyone, dominating in the Herald Sun Shield to win best on ground for St Bede’s College in their narrow win over St Patrick’s, then continued that form in NAB League with a goal against the Chargers from 13 disposals, four marks and six tackles, then ran riot against the Falcons with four goals from 18 touches, eight marks and four tackles. Showed in Sandringham’s narrow loss to Eastern in the qualifying final that he does not need many touches to hurt the opposition, booting two goals from 13 disposals, seven marks, five tackles and three inside 50s.

#16 Liam Henry

Claremont/Western Australia | Outside Midfielder/Forward
28/08/2001 | 179cm | 67kg

A member of Fremantle’s Next Generation Academy, Henry is another lightly built midfielder who can go forward and impact a game inside 50. Henry has nice skills and slick athletic traits that help him work his way out of congestion while making good decisions with ball-in-hand. He does need to find a bit more of the football at times which is the next step, but he is a player who will rarely waste a possession and one who Fremantle fans would be excited to have on their list. Still has scope to develop further, and grow into his body at just 67kg and another sub-180cm midfielder. One who would be keen to finish off the year strongly – although perhaps Fremantle would prefer he kept it in check. A highly talented player.

July Ranking: #17

Last month: Unfortunately dislocated his knee in a school football match and has not returned since his impressive 26-disposal, six-mark, two-goal game in Round 14.

#17 Finn Maginness

Sandringham Dragons/Vic Metro | Balanced Midfielder
23/02/2001 | 187cm | 80kg

The underrated midfielder missed out on being included in the State Victorian Metro Academy, but has not let that get him down, performing strongly across the NAB League and school seasons, and working his way up the boards with some strong performances against the best players around the country. He has a nice sidestep that can get him out of trouble and wins a lot of the ball in close, with a few areas to iron out such as his kicking, but he has some great developing traits and plenty of future development. Most importantly, he can win the ball on the inside and extract it out, but can also play an outside role too.

August Ranking: #23

Last month: Carried his AFL Under-18 Championships form into his NAB League back-end of the season, having an impact through the middle and up forward, booting five goals – including three in the tight loss over Oakleigh in the final round – and racking up a combined 50 disposals in the two other games with the majority of his time spent in the middle. Is averaging more than five clearances per game since returning to the competition and could be the first Dragon picked in a tight contest with McAsey and Bergman. Did have a quiet game in the first final against Eastern, picking up 14 touches, but laid the 10 tackles showing his strong work defensively.

#18 Mitch O'Neill

Tasmania Devils/Allies | Outside Midfielder
21/02/2001 | 178cm | 69kg

The top Tasmanian prospect was an All-Australian in his bottom-age year, and has a nice blend of inside and outside capabilities. Given his lightly built frame, expect O’Neill to stick to the outside during the National Under 18 Championships, but he can win his own ball at the same time. He reads the taps well and is able to spread to the outside, pumping the ball inside 50 to set up scoring chains. Having spent time in defence last year, O’Neill has moved into the midfield and found just as much of the ball, and is a crucial ball user on the outside. He will be the player most analysed by opposition sides when playing Tasmania Devils in the NAB League, and O’Neill will enjoy added freedom at the National Under 18 Championships for the Allies.

August Ranking: #11

Last month: Has missed the past month due to injury.

#19 Jackson Mead

WWT Eagles/South Australia | Balanced Midfielder
30/09/2001 | 183cm | 83kg

The son of Port Adelaide inaugural Best and Fairest winner, Darren has made a promising start to the 2019 SANFL season, starting in the Reserves and impressing, showing that a League debut would be in the not-too-distint future. Mead will team up with Stephens at the National Under 18 Championships to lead the side through his penetrating kick and good skills, spreading around and using the ball well forward of centre. Not as prolific a ball winner as some others, Mead has good smarts and does not waste too many disposals. Importantly, Mead hits the scoreboard as a midfielder, and can win his own ball on the inside when required. He might play more of an inside role at the National Championships, but South Australia will be keen to give him time and space to impact the contest best.

August Ranking: #13

Last month: Had a couple of okay weeks in the League side with 11 disposals per game average, before dropping back to the Reserves and starring with 27 touches, six marks, seven inside 50s and four clearances in Woodville-West Torrens’ huge win over North Adelaide in the final round of the season. Was a late withdrawal in the final round of the season

#20 Josh Worrell

Sandringham Dragons/Vic Metro | Key Position Utility
11/04/2001 | 193cm | 78kg

The Sandringham Dragons defender has had an impressive past few weeks after not having to do too much in the Dragons’ obliteration of Calder in the opening round of the NAB League season. On the MCG against Casey Demons, Worrell stood tall in defence, showing an ability to remain calm under pressure and use the ball well. At 193cm, Worrell will be a player that clubs look at differently, being that few cms smaller than the current trend for key position defenders, which is fine considering Worrell’s ability to provide run and carry out of defence. He is still lightly built, but he is strong overhead and has the potential to develop into a tall midfielder or one who roams off half-back and sets up attacking plays. A player who will spend the season at Haileybury College.

August Ranking: #19

Last month: His season is over after a shoulder injury sidelined him for the remainder of the 2019 season.

#21 Dylan Williams

Oakleigh Chargers/Vic Metro | General Utility
01/07/2001 | 185cm | 81kg

After having a terrific second half of the year playing as a medium forward, Williams has spent time mixed between attack and defence in season 2019. He is definitely more suited to attack where he has a high vertical leap and is dangerous around goals. He is as strong overhead as anyone and certainly impressive for a player of his size. Not a huge ball winner, Williams just needs to find four quarter consistency this season as he is the player that can boot four goals in a term and take the game away from the opposition. He also has terrific skills, and hits three out of his four targets despite finding half his possessions in a contest. When at stoppages, Williams is more than capable of winning clearances as he showed against Dandenong, bursting away and pumping the ball long. One area of improvement is his defensive work, which is why he has been played in defence at times to build that area of his game. In the wet at Craigieburn against Calder Cannons in Round 2, Williams had eight out of 12 disposals effective, running at a much higher efficiency than his teammates. Does not have APS school commitments so will play the full year at NAB League Boys level with the Chargers, co-captaining the side with Trent Bianco.

August Ranking: #15

Last month: Has not played in the past month with that back injury still troubling him.

#22 Cameron Taheny

Norwood/South Australia | General Forward
03/08/2001 | 184cm | 80kg

The medium forward is an excitement machine who lit up the National Under 16 Championships in 2017. He continued that form in his bottom-age year for Norwood, booting six goals in a game last year to show off his talents inside 50. Similar to Dylan Williams, Taheny has his ups and downs, but his best is as good as anyone else’s in the draft crop. A good season could propel him into the top half of the first round, and he is a player who could turn a match on its head which will be crucial for South Australia at the National Under 18 Championships. Has already broken into the League side for Norwood and booted three goals on debut. One to watch through the year as someone who could rise.

August Ranking: #18

Last month: After three goalless games in the SANFL League, Taheny dropped back to Norwood’s reserves where he had 11 touches and booted a goal, importantly laying five tackles in the Redlegs’ 23-point victory over West Adelaide in the final round.

#23 Will Day

West Adelaide/South Australia | General Defender
17/01/2001 | 187cm | 70kg

The underrated South Australian utility has been one of the big improvers this season, showing off some nice signs at school football and then South Australia at the AFL Under 18 National Championships. Like Weightman, Day has been on the periphery of our Power Rankings the past two months, and after some solid performances at the national carnival, makes the list for July. Day has shown signs similar to last year’s bolter, Jez McLennan who had a good carnival and emerged as a top 30 prospect with nice foot skills and composure. Day can kick on either side of his body and is a good size at 187cm despite still being very light at 70kg.

August Ranking: #26

Last month: With school football done and dusted, Day returned to the West Adelaide Reserves, picking up 26 disposals, eight marks, five inside 50s, three rebounds, three tackles and a goal in the Bloods’ loss to Norwood in the final round of the season. Picked up 20 touches, nine marks and seven rebounds in a strong performance off half-back for West Adelaide in the Under 18s first final, now playing off in a preliminary final next weekend.

#24 Connor Budarick

Gold Coast SUNS Academy/Allies | General Utility
06/04/2001 | 176cm | 70kg

The Gold Coast SUNS Academy player could draw comparisons to Ned McHenry in both his stature and defensive pressure. Budarick played as a forward last year, and has spent more time in the midfield in 2019, but will likely rotate between both at the National Under 18 Championships. Weighing in at about 70kg, Budarick is outside leaning when in the midfield and just has little bursts where he wins the football. In the exhibition match against Casey Demons, Budarick played in defence and held his own back there, but his best comes forward of centre where he lays an average of seven tackles per game, and forces turnovers close to goal. He runs hard between the arcs and will likely cost Gold Coast a top 30 pick based on his skills and work rate.

August Ranking: #21

Last month: The talented small had 12 disposals, two marks and four tackles in his final game for the year with the SUNS missing out on NEAFL action. The week before he had 13, with his best game of August coming against Brisbane Lions, racking up 18 touches, three marks, five tackles and booting a goal in the 25-point loss.

#25 Cooper Stephens

Geelong Falcons/Vic Country | Inside Midfielder
17/01/2001 | 188cm | 83kg

Geelong Falcons midfielder unfortunately fractured his fibula in in Round 3. Stephens is a huge loss for Vic Country as Falcons Talent Manager Mick Turner said he would not take part in the National Under 18 Championships next month. Stephens is a neat user of the ball, recording 65 per cent by foot, and in the two games before his injury, Stephens averaged 26 disposals, 3.5 marks, 4.0 clearances and ran at more than 60 per cent contested possessions.

August Ranking: #25

Last month: It was confirmed recently that a return for Stephens is not worth the risk, which means the Falcons co-skipper will be on ice for the remainder of the year as he has been for the majority of it. He might have slipped down the order a bit, but he could end up a value pick given what he showed last season as as bottom-ager.

#26 Deven Robertson

Perth/Western Australia | Balanced Midfielder
30/06/2001 | 182cm | 80kg

The massive ball-winning midfielder from Western Australia was been a dominant force in the AFL Under 18 National Championships after injury last year, and has boosted his draft ranking after the carnival. He still has areas to tidy up such as kicking under pressure, but would stake a case of the most consistent player in the draft crop and you know exactly what you are going to get from him.

August ranking: #28

Last month: Robertson is done for the year, needing a shoulder reconstruction after dislocating his shoulder in the final championships game.

#27 Jeremy Sharp

East Fremantle/Western Australia | Outside Midfielder
13/08/2001 | 187cm | 79kg

One of a number of East Fremantle potential draftees, Sharp is a skilled midfielder who is capable of playing off half-back as well as along the wing. He is not a massive ball winner, but he is a terrific kick of the footy and is a run-and-carry player. Along with Jackson, Sharp is a potential top 10 player who is a good size at 187cm and has added some bulk to his frame over the off-season. He is one of just three players who earned All-Australian honours as a bottom-ager last season following a magnificent Under 18 Championships. Sharp is one of those players you want the ball in their hands going forward as he will likely pinpoint a target inside 50. One to watch if he can go to another level at his top-age championships.

August Ranking: #29

Last month: Finding his feet in the WAFL League competition, picking up 22 disposals and nine marks in the Round 19 clash against Perth as he showed he belongs in senior football.

#28 Cody Weightman

Dandenong Stingrays/Vic Country | General Forward
15/01/2001 | 177cm | 73kg

For the first two months of our Power Rankings, the electric small forward has been on the periphery of making it, and after a terrific national carnival – where he booted four goals in two of his three games – Weightman makes it into the Power Rankings in July. He has a high ceiling given he can create goals out of nothing and score from general play or set shots and has a powerful kicking action to boot. Just 177cm and 73kg, Weightman is another light prospect who has plenty of development left in him. Could be another player who lights up NAB League finals as he is a big game player.

August Ranking: #20

Last month: Very raw but talented, Weightman looked like he was going to tear the game against Murray Bushrangers apart in the Wildcard Round, but after a strong first half, was ruled out of the second half with concussion as the Stingrays got up in a tight one. He finished with one goal from 12 touches after being inaccurate the week before against the Falcons with three behinds from 16 touches playing mostly through the midfield. Did not play the first final due to the concussion sustained in the Wildcard Round.

#29 Cooper Sharman

Oakleigh Chargers/Vic Metro | Tall Forward
25/07/2000 | 190cm |

The Oakleigh Chargers product is the definition of a draft bolter, with clubs keeping him under wraps until he made his Chargers’ debut in the NAB League against Gippsland Power. He has since strung a few games together at the level and has plenty of exciting traits, both athletically and game-based. He knows where the goals are, is a reliable set shot and a great overhead mark. Looks damaging every time he goes near it. Is still raw and has areas to work on, but could certainly be the Sam Sturt of 2019.

August Ranking: #22

Last month: Had his first genuine test against a full-strength Sandringham Dragons’ outfit and held his own by booting two long-range goals from seven disposals and two marks, and is an X-factor heading into finals. The week before he booted two majors against the Jets from 10 touches and three marks, showing off his aerial ability against Emerson Jeka in one-on-one victories. Was quiet in the first final against Gippsland Power with his first time going goalless, while having the 13 touches, six marks and four inside 50s, but spent time in defence as well. His handball behind his head to set up a Reef McInnes goal right before quarter time was elite.

#30 Elijah Taylor

Perth/Western Australia | General Forward
01/05/2001 | 185cm | 75kg

Taylor has X-factor and plenty of scope for the future as a medium forward. He always looks damaging when in possession and a worry for opposition defenders when not in possession. He is still raw compared to other forwards, but his ceiling is quite high and no doubt clubs will keep him on their radar. He has been a talented player for some time, but he has started to string together impressive performances to put his name into top 30 calculations. A key player for Perth in the WAFL and stepped up during the AFL Under-18 National Championships.

August Ranking: #30

Last month: Booted two goals from 10 touches stepping up to the Reserves side at Perth over the weekend, backing up his two-goal effort from 16 touches at Colts level the week before.

NAB League Boys team review: Tasmania Devils

AS the NAB League season finals approach, we take a look at the sides that are no longer in contention for the title, checking out their draft prospects, Best and Fairest (BnF) chances, 2020 Draft Crop and a final word on their season. The next side we look at is the Tasmania Devils.

Position: 12th
Wins: 4
Losses: 11
Draws: 0

Points For: 753 (Ranked #13)
Points Against: 976 (Ranked #9)
Percentage: 80
Points: 16

Top draft prospects:

Mitch O’Neill

O’Neill has had his fair share of injuries over the past 12 months, particularly regarding a troublesome ankle, but it has not stopped him being in the conversation for a top 20 pick. Despite some inconsistencies at times, his best is as good as anyone’s in the draft crop, with his foot skills and decision making at a high level. He has played off half-back or through the middle playing an outside role, but can win his own ball when required. You do not fluke back-to-back All Australians, and O’Neill is the standout prospect this year from the Apple Isle. He might be lightly built, but has some exciting traits to take to the next level.

Matthew McGuinness

After being one of a number of unlucky players not to land on an AFL list last season, the tall utility could not have done much more to stake his case in 2019. Consistently one of Tasmania’s best week-in, week-out, he was composed under pressure in a backline that often saw high entry numbers, and he would take the game on making the right decisions going forward. He also showed he is capable of playing up the other end of the ground or through the middle, but his positioning and reading of the ball in flight in defence are strengths in his game. It is hoped he can attract a late or rookie selection 12 months after missing out.

Other in the mix:

The other two players with combine invitations – both Rookie Me – are Jared Dakin and Jake Steele. Both have had different seasons with Dakin unfortunately injured and only playing his first game last weekend. He made it count and show why a club is still keen on him, racking up 25 touches, three marks and 10 inside 50s as Tasmania pushed the Calder Cannons all the way in the Wildcard Round knockout match. Steele has been a staple in the defensive 50 for Tasmania, also showing his capabilities as a forward.

BnF chances:

One would think it is a two-horse race between McGuinness and Oliver Davis, both of whom have enjoyed outstanding, consistent seasons. Along with the pair, others who have been in for nearly the entire year are Sam Collins and Patrick Walker, both of whom have shown consistency in defence. Davis has lead the onball brigade with his hard edge on the inside, while Walker recorded the most rebounds of any player on the side, and Collins split his time between defence and midfield.

2020 Draft Crop:

Tasmania’s bottom-age group this year will make the Devils a really challenging side to come up against in 2020. Lead by key forward Jackson Callow and inside midfielder Davis, the Devils have a number of draftable prospects who will really look to make their case to clubs next year. Those in contention for the BnF are also going around as top-agers next year with Collins and Walker both having another year in the system, as does Jye Menzie who showed class in glimpses and it will be interesting to see how he develops over the next 12 months. Then there is Sam Banks who is still two years away from being drafted, but expect a lot of eyes on him next year as a bottom-ager who will be talked up as a top-end 2021 draft prospect.

Final word:

Given Tasmania had never played a full season in the Victorian Under-18 competition, it was always going to be tough to see how they performed. They got a tick for their season because with so many out at times due to Allies commitments or injuries, they held up and were not blown away as often as some might have thought at first. The loss to Calder was bitterly disappointing, but once the initial feeling fades, no doubt they can look back and see how much they came in the season, pushing the fifth placed side at their opposition’s home deck, without a host of key players.