Tag: mia king

Gavalas completes “whirlwind” draft day bolt

DRAFT day shocks are ironically commonplace nowadays, and you can add Ellie Gavalas‘ rise to become a top 10 selection to the list.

The 23-year-old had her name called by North Melbourne in the first round of Tuesday’s draft having only taken up the Aussie rules code two years ago. Speaking minutes after the fact, Gavalas was still stuck in the “whirlwind” of her shock early selection with little inkling of it happening beforehand.

“Whirlwind’s a pretty good word,” she said. “I’m feeling pretty excited and shocked at the moment… it’s been a massive year and to top it off to become a Kangaroo is pretty exciting.”

“We’d had a couple of interviews, well one interview but I’d seen (North Melbourne AFLW list manager Rhys Harwood) a couple of times. “But no, I wasn’t expecting anything. I was hoping but not expecting anything so I’m pretty shocked.”

The new Roo’s history in sport runs deep, having moved on from a promising soccer career to pursue a different footballing code. Gavalas grew up in Tasmania but also had family in Melbourne, with her move to the mainland originally inspired by that round-ball potential. Her first meaningful experience with the oblong ball came as she joined the Marcellin Old Collegians in Melbourne’s north-east, sparking a rapid rise to the elite level.

“Coming from just playing footy for two years… mainly this year and last year at Marcellin,” Gavalas said. “It has been a massive whirlwind and I’m pretty excited.”

After her initial experience at Marcellin, Gavalas became a wildcard entrant to Western Bulldogs’ VFLW squad in 2019, making her debut in Round 2 and never looking back to average 16.4 disposals and 4.1 tackles across 16 games – becoming a lock in the grand finalists’ starting 23.

Her move from the Bulldogs into the Kangaroos’ system is akin to that of AFLW superstar Emma Kearney – minus the fanfare – who will undoubtedly form a hardened midfield partnership with Gavalas.

“Absolutely I’m looking forward to playing alongside (Kearney),” she said. “To be playing with someone like Emma is awesome so I’m super excited to get started.”

The switch also marks somewhat of a homecoming for the Apple Isle product, who joins Launceston exports Mia King and Abbey Green at the Tasmanian Roos. The Roos’ home games across Bass Strait and academy connection to the region also bring Gavalas full-circle, and even the best script writers would struggle to match the sentimentality of that journey.

With only her everyday job as a physiotherapist to compete with celebrations and her emerging career, the mature-ager is sure to make an immediate impact among the raft of slightly younger draftees who shared the same honour on Tuesday.

2019 AFL Women’s Draft preview

UP to 102 draft hopefuls could realise their AFL Women’s dream tomorrow when the 2019 AFL Women’s Draft takes place. Clubs will have between four and 13 picks in the draft, with Melbourne and Richmond having the benchmark minimum and maximum selections. Collingwood will enter the draft last of all clubs, with the Magpies’ first selection at a lowly 67. Up the other end, the Western Bulldogs have four top 10 picks and will welcome in a host of young pups to the Kennel.

A number of players have already been selected such as Millie Brown (Geelong) and Isabella Grant (Western Bulldogs) under the father-daughter rule, but their pick selection is unknown until draft day. Meanwhile, Carlton has pre-selected Grace Egan who played for Richmond’s VFL Women’s side this season, and Egan will be taken with Pick 13. This AFL Women’s Draft marks the first time that Richmond, St Kilda, Gold Coast and West Coast will take part as the expansion clubs into the competition next year.

Three players are in contention for the number one selection at tomorrow’s AFL Women’s Draft, with Western Bulldogs set to pick between Geelong Falcons’ Lucy McEvoy, Calder Cannons’ Georgia Patrikios and Northern Knights’ Gabby Newton. Carlton and St Kilda have the next two Victorian selections in the AFL Women’s Draft. Looking at the Queensland sides, Brisbane has the first four picks from that state before Gold Coast enter the draft, while over in Western Australia, Fremantle have the first selection and six of the top 10 compared to West Coast’s four. Players from other states expected to go highly are Western Australia’s Roxanne Roux, Queensland’s Lily Postlethwaite and South Australia’s Montana McKinnon. Tasmania’s top prospect, Mia King will likely find her way to North Melbourne given the Kangaroos have first chance to secure the talented youngster.

The 2019 NAB AFL Women’s Draft will be live streamed on womens.afl, the AFLW App and the AFLW Facebook account from 10:40am EDT tomorrow, Tuesday October 22.

For features on more than 80 AFL Women’s Draft hopefuls, check out our AFL Women’s Features page.

Below we have listed the club-by-club breakdown as well as the state-based selections that clubs will take to the draft.

CLUB-BY-CLUB BREAKDOWN

Adelaide [8]: 14, 37, 46, 53, 68, 83, 100, 102

Brisbane [9]: 3, 15, 16, 17, 20, 28, 45, 60, 75

Carlton [7]: 2, 13 (Grace Egan), 26, 36, 44, 52, 59

Collingwood [5]: 67, 74, 82, 89, 94

Fremantle [7]: 12, 21, 35, 51, 66, 81, 85

Geelong [6]: 11, 34, 50, 65, 80, 98

Gold Coast [8]: 18, 22, 38, 42, 57, 69, 86, 91

GWS Giants [9]: 4, 23, 29, 61, 76, 90, 95, 97, 99

Melbourne [4]: 54, 72, 77, 78

North Melbourne [5]: 10, 32, 49, 64, 79

Richmond [13]: 7, 25, 31, 40, 43, 55, 58, 71, 73, 84, 87, 93, 96

St Kilda [7]: 5, 24, 27, 30, 33, 41, 63

West Coast [6]: 19, 39, 56, 70, 92, 101

Western Bulldogs [8]: 1, 6, 8, 9, 47, 48, 62, 88

STATE-BASED DRAFT PICKS:

Queensland:

Brisbane [9]: 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 11, 13, 15

Gold Coast [8]: 5, 7, 9, 10, 12, 14, 16, 17

Victoria:

Carlton [7]: 2, 10 (Egan), 20, 24, 29, 33

Collingwood [5]: 38, 42, 47, 51, 53,

Geelong [6]: 9, 19, 28, 37, 46, 55

Melbourne [4]: 30, 40, 43, 44

North Melbourne [5]: 8, 17, 27, 36, 45

Richmond [13]: 5, 12, 16, 21, 23, 31, 32, 39, 41, 48, 49, 52, 54

St Kilda [7]: 3, 11, 14, 15, 18, 22, 35

Western Bulldogs [8]: 1, 4, 6, 7, 25, 26, 34, 50

Western Australia:

Fremantle [7]: 1, 3, 4, 6, 8, 10, 11

West Coast [6]: 2, 5, 7, 9, 12, 13

King emerges from Apple Isle

FOR 18-year-old Tasmanian Mia King, it has not been a traditional route to this level, but it has certainly found her well with plenty of opportunity once she opted to follow the Australian rules football pathway in high school.

“I started (when) one of the PE (physical education) teachers at school came up to me – and it was like a school team – he asked if I wanted to get involved and I said yes,” King said. “So it started off as a bit of fun for like a school club, East Launceston, and then I went away on the Kickstart program, started getting selected for (representative teams) and that’s when it really took off. “Then I obviously got selected for the Allies three years ago and yeah, it’s just been getting bigger each year I guess.”

The talented midfielder shared Eastern Allies captaincy in 2019, her third year with the side. King credits the privilege of working with her teammates as something that spurs her on, with her confidence growing from every match.

“This (was) my third Allies trip,” she said. “On the first one I was so young, so nervous and now I feel completely relaxed and comfortable around everyone and definitely it’s really helped me grow as a person being on the trips. “Obviously I was always the one looking up to the bigger girls and now vice-captaining the Allies this year has been a massive privilege and it’s just really great to be able to talk to the girls like that.”

AFL Tasmania has a direct affiliation with North Melbourne in the AFL Women’s, something King said is a massive step in the right direction for juniors aspiring to AFLW greatness.

“It’s so exciting,” she said. “There wasn’t a pathway for any kids and now we’ve got an affiliation with North Melbourne, we’re getting home games down at UTAS and North Melbourne and it’s really exciting to see for the younger girls in Tasmania that there is an opportunity for AFLW at an elite level. “We actually got to train with North Melbourne in our pre-season. We trained with them once a week, so I’ve been training with Daria (Bannister) and the Haines’ (twins Chloe and Libby) which is really good because you’re seeing them at that elite level and being in that environment is really good for development for the younger girls coming through.”

Tasmania had another massive opportunity in 2019, playing three matches in the NAB League Girls as the Tasmania Devils. King averaged 19.7 touches, 4.7 tackles and three inside 50s across the three games.

“I like to just attack the ball, get the footy, I’m a hunter I guess,” she said. “Obviously with NAB League this was the first year they had the Tasmania Devils for the girls so it was really exciting. “We got to (fly) over to Melbourne and play a few games in the NAB League. “I think it was really good for our skill development because I think it really helped us in Blacktown when we came to New South Wales.”

“So it was just really good and I think next year they’re planning to have even more games – like eight or nine – this year we only had like two or three, and trying to get some home games down there,” King said. “Vic’s got a lot of talent and we’ve just got to try and look at their play, learn their strengths but also just focus on our strengths as well.”

With plenty of strong talent across Australia, King said improvement is key with skill development in the works.

“I reckon my skill development still needs improving and I’m trying to keep working on my kicking,” she said. “So I reckon just working on the skills and obviously I was a bit sick at the start of the year so my fitness isn’t really where I want it to be, but I’m just working on that to get it up. “It’s really exciting, I’ve just got to keep working on my skills, fitness and just see what happens.”

Club collaboration the key to AFLW future

FROM a young age, winning is something that is instilled in every competitive sportsperson. But sometimes there is the need for the greater good, and in the case of the women’s football space, the greater good is growing the competition to the point where sustained success at the elite level is guaranteed. To do that, clubs such as Melbourne Uni are collaborating at Victorian Football League (VFL) Women’s level to foster the next elite talent that will run around in the AFL Women’s. The competitive edge is not lost on Mugars’ coach Scott Gowans, but for the game to grow in the best possible way, Gowans said the VFLW competition is a pathway to breed talent for the next level either for the affiliate club or for an opposition side.

“I think we did that even before the season,” he said. “We were really big on last year’s group of Melbourne Uni players and doing the right thing by them. So we had chat with Lauren Ahrens and offered her to go to Richmond or St Kilda and try her luck there – she went to the Saints , didn’t work out – and then ended up getting picked up by the Gold Coast and ended up at Essendon. Caitlin Greiser has just been picked up by St Kilda, Hannah Ibrahim at Richmond. “There’s a number of traditional Melbourne Uni girls that we talked about what was best for them, not just what was best for us. “From the perspective of the current list, Katie Angelis and Viv Saad, Airlie Runnalls, people like that, they’re all draftable players. They’re all footballers, maybe not for us because of what we need, but for other clubs definitely. “We share a lot of information with the other clubs as well to help their cases as well because that’s a big part of it, trying to get players drafted.”

Every year Under-18 talents filter into VFLW programs from the mid-point of the season and get some games under their belt in order to present their case to be drafted into the AFLW for the following season. While many clubs ideally would draft those players into their AFLW affiliate, sometimes they do not have a need, but instead those players fill one for another club such as the case of one particular Vic Metro Under 18s player.

Cleo Saxon-Jones that we’ve got is an interesting prospect,” Gowans said. “She’s tall and strong and she probably has just not learnt to use her body to her advantage yet, but for someone that’s 185cm she’s so clean below her knees and we don’t necessarily need a tall forward and we don’t need a ruck. “But where we sit on the spectrum of women’s footy is that it’s really important that we develop Cleo for other clubs, and a couple of the clubs during the year have said ‘can we see Cleo at full-forward’, higher up at centre half-forward – we did that last week on a request – couple of the other players are in similar boats that we’ve played them where other clubs want to see them and I don’t necessarily think it hurts your win-loss, but what it does do is the ball will go back the other way at some stage and we’ll ask someone to have a look at a player in a different position. “I just think it’s a really healthy spot that the competition’s in.”

In some cases, it can also work in the opposite way, with North Melbourne AFLW list manager Rhys Harwood working hard behind the scenes to not only spot the best talent for the Roos, but approach other clubs with Mugars players who might be best suited for a particular AFLW club.

“Yeah Rhys Harwood does that (approaches other clubs to recommend players),” Gowans said. “He promotes our list to other clubs when they ask questions and vice-versa, which is really good as well. “We’ve got the players hearts and interests and at the end of the day we want to see them all drafted, hopefully to North Melbourne but it just can’t happen because of the list spots. “But if they can get drafted somewhere else then you still feel proud to be part of their journey.”

To give an idea of how much women’s football has developed over the past couple of years, Gowans said that now a collaborative approach is in place with clubs working together for the greater good, the competition is becoming increasingly even. When asked if the process was made easier in the women’s space compared to the men’s – where competitive advantage is priority – Gowans said the overall change in the women’s space over the past two years made it possible.

“It’s a great question because I would have said no (that it was not easier than the men’s) in 2017 when I was in Diamond Creek, because it was very competitive from a club point of view, but I think it’s completely changed around now and it’s completely different to the men’s as well which is great,” Gowans said. “At the end of the day we’re all custodians of this game. “Part of our jobs is to win, yep no problem, but it’s also to develop football for beyond 20 years time. “To do that, the only way to do that is to expand quickly and if you’re going to do that, you’ve got to have collaboration with the clubs. I think it’s a really healthy spot and you run on the field with your 23 players and absolutely want to win, but there’s also a piece of everyone’s involvement in the game that says you must do what’s right for the game as well which goes to style of footy and everything like that.”

But North fans should not worry too much, because the list management team has plenty of cards up its sleeve. Another area that has changed in the women’s football space is the recruitment process and role delegation within football clubs. Gowans said coaches were still involved in the recruiting process, but more after the recruitment team had identified players. The North Melbourne coach said he flew up to the AFL Women’s Under-18 Championships to get a first hand look at the next potential stars of the competition, with a special eye on the Tasmanian prospects such as Mia King who the Kangaroos have first access to given their association with the Apple Isle.

“I watch the vision and get the reports from her (King’s) coaches and how she’s going,” Gowans said. “She’s going really well. “I went up to Nationals and watched her. “You have an eye on it but I think if I reflect back when I was at Carlton in Year 1, it was a little different in list management in Graham Burgen was the head of Carlton’s list management and he did a job there that was he had the say on the list, but Damien Keeping, myself, a couple of other people we all had a say in it. “Whereas now I presented how I want to play, the type of players I like and then Rhys Harwood and his team have gone out and found those players to that game plan which I think is a much healthier way to do it because you’re concentrating on what I’m employed for which is to coach. “So that’s really beneficial.”

AFL Women’s Draft Combine: Player Summaries

AFTER the 2019 AFL Women’s Draft Combine list of names were announced earlier in the week, we take a look at each player who was nominated, with a quick summary and link to their profile. Check them out below:

2019 AFLW NAB Draft Combine Nominees

NSW/ACT: [3]

Georgia Garnett (East Coast Eagles)
* Eastern Allies captain, member of the GWS GIANTS Academy and a player from the GIANTS heartland of western Sydney

Eloise Hiller-Stanbrook (Dubbo)
* Tireless ruck who averaged 14 hitouts per game at the AFL Women’s Under-18 Championships

Brenna Tarrant (East Coast Eagles)
* All-Australian in 2019 and a crucial key defender who can move up the ground, also from western Sydney heartland

QUEENSLAND: [8]

Georgia Breward (Coolangatta)+
* Suffered a season-ending injury last year but showed plenty of talent and determination

Isabel Dawes (Maroochydore)
* Classy, smart forward who made All-Australian last year in her middle-age year

Dee Heslop (Yeronga South Brisbane)
* Consistent player who has been reliable in the defensive half and uses the ball well

Tahlia Hickie (Coorparoo)+
* Ruck prospect who played as an over-ager at the championships and performed strongly

Lily Postlethwaite (Maroochydore)
* Dual All-Australian and state captain, super talented midfielder

Taylor Smith (Bond University)+
* Tall target who presented well during the championships up forward, another overage player on the list

Serene Watson (Bond University)
* Another dual All-Australian from Queensland who provided a reliable marking target in the defensive half, repelling opposition attacks time and time again

Tarni White (Coorparoo)
* Returned from an ACL injury to show some promising signs at the championships and has plenty of upside

SOUTH AUSTRALIA: [4]

Montana McKinnon (South Adelaide)
* Dual All-Australian ruck and dual Most Valuable Player (MVP), South Australian and Central Allies captain, South Adelaide premiership player… the list of accolades is unbelievable. Top ruck in the draft crop

Hannah Munyard (South Adelaide)
* Smart user of the footy with elite athletic traits, premiership player at South Adelaide predominantly through the midfield

Madison Newman (West Adelaide)
* One of the top rebounders in the draft crop, an All-Australian in 2019 and consistent as they come

Jaimi Tabb (Woodville-West Torrens)
* Tackling machine who thrives on the contest and has shown a capability to also win the ball on the outside as well

TASMANIA: [1]

Mia King (Launceston)
* Super talented mover through the midfield with burst speed, King won the Eastern Allies’ MVP for the carnival to go with her All-Australian selection. North Melbourne have first priority being Tasmanian

VIC COUNTRY: [10]

Teagan Brett (Murray Bushrangers)
* Small midfielder who came of age in the championships, playing well on the outside and getting the ball from midfield into attack

Millie Brown (Murray Bushrangers)
* Potential Geelong father-daughter selection, Brown was superb across the championships in defence until injury ruled her out of the final game. 2019 All-Australian

Luka Lesosky-Hay (Geelong Falcons)
* Accumulator who just finds the football and works hard into space, a key cog in Geelong Falcons’ midfield with Lucy McEvoy

Lucy McEvoy (Geelong Falcons)
* Hard to even begin with the accolades, but a three-time All-Australian, dual Best and Fairest, premiership captain, Vic Country MVP… just a star and unbelievable leader who has captained for three years at the Falcons

Sophie Molan (GWV Rebels)
* Natural born leader who captained the Rebels this year and is as versatile as they come, can play anywhere and was a 2019 All-Australian

Shanara Notman (Gippsland Power)
* A late bloomer after having last year off, she can play up either end and is strong in the air and very good athletically

Paige Sheppard (Geelong Falcons)
* Raised her draft stocks at the championships with a terrific carnival following on from a consistent year in the NAB League Girls

Brooke Vernon (Dandenong Stingrays)
* One of Dandenong’s best in the NAB League Girls this year, playing as a rebounding defender who is as good in the air as she is at ground level

Nikia Webber (Gippsland Power)
* Tall forward who can also play through the midfield, Webber is an elite kick of the footy, arguably the best in the draft crop with accuracy and penetration

Ella Wood (GWV Rebels)
* Uncompromising midfielder who loves the contested side of footy and relishes winning the hard ball with great courage

VIC METRO: [15]

Alana Barba (Calder Cannons)
* A tackling machine who stood up particularly later in the year, emerging as a genuine draft chance with great defensive pressure

Molly Denahy-Maloney (Sandringham Dragons)
* Athletic ruck who captained Sandringham Dragons this year and held up Vic Metro’s ruck division in 2019

Elisabeth Georgostathis (Western Jets)
* Captain of Western Jets and one who always puts her body on the line, Georgostathis was another who raised her draft stocks at the championships with important moments in big games. Can play anywhere on the field too

Isabella Grant (Western Jets)
* Potential Western Bulldogs father-daughter, she is able to play midfield or forward and can take a grab and hit the scoreboard

Britney Gutknecht (Northern Knights)
* Known for her goalkicking last year, Gutknecht became an inside midfielder this year and was a key player in the Knights’ premiership side

Gemma Lagioia (Oakleigh Chargers)
* Classy user of the football who can play anywhere on the ground, she was able to develop her inside game at the championships to add another string to her bow

Laura McClelland (Eastern Ranges)
* One of only three Vic Metro All-Australians, McClelland can play anywhere on the ground and is strong in the air and capable of kicking terrific goals

Nell Morris-Dalton (Northern Knights)
* One of the most consistent players this season, Morris-Dalton had a massive end to the NAB League Girls season and is so strong one-on-one, particularly in the air

Gabrielle Newton (Northern Knights)
* Dual All-Australian, Northern Knights premiership captain and one who is almost copied and pasted into the best every week, Newton hardly puts a foot wrong and has played literally everywhere on the field from the ruck to all thirds of the ground given her athletic talents

Georgia Patrikios (Calder Cannons)
* Overall MVP of the championships, Patrikios led her Calder side to a grand final and has the best agility of any player in the draft crop. Uses the ball well and is a dual All-Australian too

Marguerite Purcell (Sandringham Dragons)
* Speedy winger who has developed rapidly this year playing for the Dragons and earned a spot on Vic Metro’s list for the championships, holding her own there

Sarah Sansonetti (Northern Knights)
* Reliable defender who stood up in the NAB League Girls Grand Final for Northern and just does the job week-in, week-out

Cleo Saxon-Jones (Western Jets)
* Key forward who is a strong contested mark and powerful set shot at goal, she thrived on one-on-one situations at the championships

Felicity Theodore (Calder Cannons)
* Fierce tackling runner who just works hard all day and attacks the footy and ball carrier with vigour, able to play up either end and provide great defensive pressure

Nicola Xenos (Oakleigh Chargers)
* Talented running defender who uses the ball well off half-back and makes good decisions with ball-in-hand

WESTERN AUSTRALIA: [4]

Sophie McDonald (Claremont)+
* Key defender who repelled opposition attacks and was able to set up attacking plays after some goal-saving moves deep in defence

Emma O’Driscoll (Swan Districts)*
* Did not play up on the Gold Coast, but O’Driscoll is a reliable defender who has good positioning and high level smarts

Roxanne Roux (East Fremantle)
* Exciting key forward who has a massive vertical leap and could become a human highlight reel with her long kicking, goal sense and work rate; another All-Australian

Mim Strom (South Fremantle)
* Really stood out in the ruck as a key player who not only worked well at stoppages, but at ground level and around the ground, providing an impact – 2019 All-Australian too

+Overage player (ie. born 2000)

2019 AFL Women’s Draft Combine invitations announced

FORTY-five players have been invited to the 2019 AFL Women’s NAB Draft Combine, with 25 from Victoria – where eight of the 10 AFL Women’s clubs are based, with Queensland (eight) the next highest. Four players from both South Australia and Western Australia have been invited, as have three from NSW/ACT and one from Tasmania. Among the invitees are five overagers (eligible last year), as well as two father-daughter potential selections in Isabella Grant (Western Bulldogs) and Millie Brown (Geelong). Players who are already pre-listed to clubs such as Gold Coast’s Ellie Hampson, West Coast’s Mikayla Bowen and St Kilda’s Molly McDonald and Isabella Shannon were not included in the invitations.

The combine will be held from October 1-3 to align with the AFL Under-18 National Combine. Western Bulldogs hold the first pick in this year’s AFL Women’s Draft.

Extended content on the invitees will come later in the week.

2019 AFLW NAB Draft Combine Nominees

NSW/ACT: [3]
Georgia Garnett (East Coast Eagles)
Eloise Hiller-Stanbrook (Dubbo)
Brenna Tarrant (East Coast Eagles)

QUEENSLAND: [8]
Georgia Breward (Coolangatta)*
Isabel Dawes (Maroochydore)
Dee Heslop (Yeronga South Brisbane)
Tahlia Hickie (Coorparoo)*
Lily Postlethwaite (Maroochydore)
Taylor Smith (Bond University)*
Serene Watson (Bond University)
Tarni White (Coorparoo)

SOUTH AUSTRALIA: [4]
Montana McKinnon (South Adelaide)
Hannah Munyard (South Adelaide)
Madison Newman (West Adelaide)
Jaimi Tabb (Woodville-West Torrens)

TASMANIA: [1]
Mia King (Launceston)

VIC COUNTRY: [10]
Teagan Brett (Murray Bushrangers)
Millie Brown (Murray Bushrangers)
Luka Lesosky-Hay (Geelong Falcons)
Lucy McEvoy (Geelong Falcons)
Sophie Molan (GWV Rebels)
Shanara Notman (Gippsland Power)
Paige Sheppard (Geelong Falcons)
Brooke Vernon (Dandenong Stingrays)
Nikia Webber (Gippsland Power)
Ella Wood (GWV Rebels)

VIC METRO: [15]
Alana Barba (Calder Cannons)
Molly Denahy-Maloney (Sandringham Dragons)
Elisabeth Georgostathis (Western Jets)
Isabella Grant (Western Jets)
Britney Gutknecht (Northern Knights)
Gemma Lagioia (Oakleigh Chargers)
Laura McClelland (Eastern Ranges)
Nell Morris-Dalton (Northern Knights)
Gabrielle Newton (Northern Knights)
Georgia Patrikios (Calder Cannons)
Marguerite Purcell (Sandringham Dragons)
Sarah Sansonetti (Northern Knights)
Cleo Saxon-Jones (Western Jets)
Felicity Theodore (Calder Cannons)
Nicola Xenos (Oakleigh Chargers)

WESTERN AUSTRALIA: [4]
Sophie McDonald (Claremont)*
Emma O’Driscoll (Swan Districts)*
Roxanne Roux (East Fremantle)
Mim Strom (South Fremantle)

*Overage player (ie. born 2000)

2019 Eastern Allies Podcast | Interviews with Mia King, Georgia Garnett, Brenna Tarrant, Lillian Doyle and Jordyn Jolliffe

IN a new Final Siren podcast series reviewing the AFL Women’s Under-18 Championships side-by-side, we take a look at some of the top prospects who performed strongly across all three lines, as well interviews with key players within each individual state.

The first edition is the Eastern Allies, and Final Siren podcast host Matthew Cocks, and Draft Central‘s Peter Williams discuss the players who caught the eye across the championships, as well have interviews with captain Georgia Garnett, vice-captain and Most Valuable Player (MVP) Mia King, AFLWU18 All-Australian Brenna Tarrant and the talented Lillian Doyle and Jordyn Jolliffe.

Below is full Eastern Allies podcast.

You can also find the Final Siren podcast and listen to past or future episodes on the following platforms:

Anchor

Apple Podcasts

Google Podcasts

Spotify

Breaker

Overcast

Pocket Casts

PodBean

RadioPublic

For all the AFLW U18s Championships news, head to our AFLW U18s Championships page and keep an eye out for our features starting soon!

2019 AFLW Under-18 All Australian side announced

VIC COUNTRY has earned the most nominations in the 2019 AFL Women’s Under-18 All Australian side with six players named in the final 22. Country’s state rival Vic Metro had four, the same amount as Queensland despite the differing results at the championships. Western Australia and Central Allies both had three players in the side, whilst Eastern Allies had the two.

Geelong Falcons’ premiership captain Lucy McEvoy was named captain of the All Australian side, and was one of a number of multiple All Australians, including fellow Most Valuable Players (MVPs), Montana McKinnon and Georgia Patrikios, as well as Serene Watson, Gabby Newton and Lily Postlethwaite all backing up their 2018 selections with 2019 jumpers. McEvoy has the rare honour of making it three consecutive All Australian jumpers, named in the side from 2017-19.

Much like last year’s side, this year’s 2019 All Australian team features a number of bottom-agers, with Vic Country’s Tyanna Smith and Olivia Barber, Vic Metro’s Ellie McKenzie, and Central Allies’ Teah Charlton all making the team despite not being eligible to be drafted until next year.

Of the first time All-Australians, the defence is held down by Queensland with MVP Ellie Hampson and running machine Kitara Whap-Farrar joining Watson in the back six. Brenna Tarrant earns a key defensive post with Vic Country’s Millie Brown alongside teammate Smith at half-back.

Through midfield, St Kilda pre-listed player Molly McDonald and West Coast pre-listed midfielder Mikayla Bowen assist McEvoy onball, while Patrikios and the versatile Sophie Molan are on the wings.

In the forward 50, Roxanne Roux and Charlton are likely to provide the highlights in the air, while McKenzie and Eastern Allies’ MVP Mia King provides the strength. Newton and Barber straighten the side up with some height in the key posts.

Postlethwaite makes the bench once again in the side, joined by players from three different states in Central Allies’ Madison Newman, Western Australia’s Mim Strom and Vic Metro’s Laura McClelland.

Draft Central Team of the Week: AFLW U18 Championships – Round 2

AFTER a massive week on the Gold Coast, we at Draft Central have named our Team of the Week for the AFL Women’s Under-18 Championships. For the exercise, the 24-player team does not include form from Round 1 (ie. prior to the Gold Coast matches) and only includes players who played all three matches, therefore a number of middle-agers such as Ellie McKenzie are ineligible having played just the two games as it is such a short tournament. Across the breakdown, Central Allies actually had the most individual standouts with five players named in our Team of the Week, followed by Vic Metro, Vic Country, Queensland and Western Australia all on four, and Eastern Allies on three after even team performances.

BACKS:

Madison Newman (CENTRAL ALLIES) – The rebounding defender had the equal second most rebounds at the carnival and averaged 15.3 disposals and 2.7 marks out of defence.
Shantel Miskin-Ripia (CENTRAL ALLIES) – The NT Thunder defender was far and away the most dominant rebounder, averaging almost seven per game, and was a crucial key in getting the ball out of defence when under siege against other opponents in tight games.
Kitara Whap-Farrar (QUEENSLAND) – Was an excitement machine with X-factor and one of a number of pre-listed AFL Women’s players who stepped up at the carnival, averaging 12.0 disposals and 2.7 tackles per game.

HALF-BACKS:

Ellie Hampson (QUEENSLAND) – The Queensland MVP was a huge ball winner for the home side and was deserving of the honour in a side that failed to win a game. The pre-listed Gold Coast SUNS player averaged 20.3 disposals, 4.0 marks, 4.3 tackles, 3.3 inside 50s and 2.0 rebounds.
Serene Watson (QUEENSLAND) – Another member of the impressive Queensland defence, Watson was crucial in getting the ball out of danger and still winning the footy. She dropped into the hole to intercept and rebound, averaging 14.7 disposals, 3.7 rebounds and 3.7 tackles.
Georgia Patrikios (VIC METRO) – Probably a little cheeky to have the winger here, but Patrikios averaged more than two rebounds per game on her way to having the equal sixth most of any player in the carnival. She played across all three thirds and also averaged 20.7 disposals, 2.3 marks and 5.0 tackles on her way to the overall MVP.

CENTRES:

Sophie Molan (VIC COUNTRY) – The versatile utility was consistent across all three games for Vic Country, averaging 17.0 disposals, 5.7 tackles and 2.0 clearances and earned her spot on the wing in the side.
Lily Postlethwaite (QUEENSLAND) – Backed up her dominant carnival last year with another great effort as a top-ager this year. The Queensland captain averaged 16.0 disposals, 3.3 marks, 2.0 clearances, 2.0 inside 50s and 2.0 tackles.
Lucy McEvoy (VIC COUNTRY) – The Vic Country MVP and Geelong Falcons premiership skipper was a ray of consistency through good and bad, and was the biggest ball winner at the carnival, averaging 21.0 disposals, 3.3 clearances, 2.0 marks and 5.0 tackles whilst booting three goals.

HALF-FORWARDS:

Teah Charlton (CENTRAL ALLIES) – The middle-age forward looms as a top talent for next year after roaming up the ground and causing defensive half headaches for the opposition. She averaged a massive 7.0 tackles to go with her 14.3 disposals, 2.3 marks, 3.3 inside 50s and booted a goal.
Gabby Newton (VIC METRO) – A standout for the Metro side and no doubt a shade behind eventual MVP Georgia Patrikios, standing up in each of the three games with great consistency. Newton averaged 15.7 disposals, 4.0 marks, 4.0 tackles and 3.0 clearances.
Tyanna Smith (VIC COUNTRY) – Another player who is not eligible to be drafted until next year, Smith kept getting better as the championships rolled on, providing dash and hardness between the arcs. She averaged 16.0 disposals, 4.3 inside 50s – ranked equal first – and 6.3 tackles.

FORWARDS:

Olivia Barber (VIC COUNTRY) – Led the overall goalkicking for the week with five majors, proving to be a threat up forward. While the majority came in the opening match, Barber provided a great target in the air and at ground level and worked hard inside 50.
Cleo Saxon-Jones (VIC METRO) – Stepped up as a key target inside 50 for Metro and gave a chop out in the ruck, booting the three goals, but assisting in a number of others and providing a presence in attack.
Roxanne Roux (WESTERN AUSTRALIA) – The high-flying West Australian forward was dominant at her best and still looking dangerous when she was being held. Showed off her leap on the opening day chopping out in the ruck, and continued to present throughout the week with a high ceiling for improvement.

RUCKS:

Montana McKinnon (CENTRAL ALLIES) – The captain and MVP was terrific in the ruck, but she earns the spot for her work around the ground. While Mim Strom had more hitouts, McKinnon took a number of strong grabs throughout the week at crucial times, averaging 11.7 disposals. 3.7 marks and 16.3 hitouts per game.
Mia King (EASTERN ALLIES) – The Tasmanian and vice-captain of the Eastern Allies was one of the most consistent players across the carnival using her burst and ability to do all the defensive things right. King averaged 5.3 clearances – ranked first – as well as 18.0 disposals, 6.7 tackles and 2.3 inside 50s.
Mikayla Bowen (WESTERN AUSTRALIA) – The West Australian leader and pre-listed West Coast player lived up to expectations with a sensational carnival, winning her state’s MVP. She averaged 8.0 tackles and 5.0 clearances per game – ranked second in both – as well as 17.7 disposals.

INT:

Nyra Anderson (WESTERN AUSTRALIA) – Underrated West Australian midfielder who finished the carnival with two big games, averaging 13.3 disposals, 4.0 clearances and 5.0 tackles.
Abby Favell (EASTERN ALLIES) – Murray Bushrangers’ middle-age midfielder who continued her ball-winning form to have an impact in the Eastern Allies’ midfield. She finished with 11.0 disposals, 2.7 marks and 2.7 tackles per game.
Elisabeth Georgostathis (VIC METRO) – Worked hard and stepped up in big moments for Vic Metro, having more impact than her 9.0 disposals per game might suggest, also laying 4.7 tackles and booting the match sealer against Queensland at Southport.
Jayde Hamilton (EASTERN ALLIES) – Another Eastern Allies midfielder who was fierce in her attack on the ball, laying 5.7 tackles per game to go with her 11.3 disposals, 3.3 clearances and 2.7 inside 50s per game.
Mim Strom (WESTERN AUSTRALIA) – The dominant ruck of the carnival who only misses out on the spot due to McKinnon’s dominance around the ground and her MVP achievement. Strom racked up 27.7 hitouts per game – 10 more than her nearest rival – as well as 9.3 disposals and 2.3 tackles.
Jaimi Tabb (CENTRAL ALLIES) – The number one tackler at the carnival, Tabb cracked in and won the hard ball whilst keeping opposition players looking over their shoulders. She laid 8.7 tackles per game to go with her 11.3 disposals.

AFLW U18 National Championships wrap

VIC Metro had an undefeated run in the championships, dominating across the board after coming into the Queensland series with a win over Vic Country. Every other team fought hard at each contest in what was a mostly even carnival played in a variety of conditions. We recap how each side fared and shed light on some of the better performers throughout the competition.

Central Allies (2-1)

Results:
Eastern Allies 4.8 (32) def. by Central Allies 5.6 (36)
Western Australia 5.2 (32) def. Central Allies 1.4 (10)
Queensland 4.5 (29) def. by Central Allies 5.0 (30)

MVP: Montana McKinnon

The Central Allies put up a solid performance at the championships, coming away with close wins over Eastern Allies and Queensland. The only chink in the armour came from Western Australia on the Wednesday, where they struggled to find connections across the field to go down by 22 points. The players who stood up time and time again were the likes of Teah Charlton and Jaimi Tabb who both imposed themselves throughout the Championships with good marking and strong tackling. Montana McKinnon was awarded the MVP for her work across the field, defensive presence and clever use of the footy while Tayla Hart-Aluni provided plenty of excitement with her dash across the ground. Tegan Usher showcased their strength taking some strong grabs throughout the series while using the ball well by foot. There was plenty to like about the Allies who grew as the competition went on finding stronger connections and creating good space to hit each other on the lead.

Eastern Allies (0-3)

Results:
Eastern Allies 4.8 (32) def. by Central Allies 5.6 (36)
Vic Country 6.6 (42) def. Eastern Allies 2.0 (12)
Vic Metro 11.9 (75) def. Eastern Allies 0.3 (3)

MVP: Mia King

Eastern Allies lost each of their three games only kicked six goals, but were competitive in both of their first two matches. Their closest match was their opener against the Central Allies, going down by four points but putting on a solid performance in a game they could well have won given they dominated the last quarter for forward 50 entries, and clearances for the game. The likes of Abby Favell, Mia King and Georgia Garnett were exceptional for Eastern Allies across the week. Favell was solid throughout the Championships going in hard at each and every contest, laying strong tackles and winning her fair share of the ball. Meanwhile King was awarded MVP honours for her efforts across the competition credit to her get in and go mentality and clean hands around the stoppages. Jayde Hamilton worked tirelessly across the matches, while Jordyn Jolliffe also played an imposing role when on the field. Brenna Tarrant was another player who stood out across the tournament.

Queensland (0-3)

Results:
Vic Country 9.7 (61) def. Queensland 3.1 (19)
Queensland 1.5 (11) def. by Vic Metro 4.5 (29)
Queensland 4.5 (29) def. by Central Allies 5.0 (30)

MVP: Ellie Hampson

Similar to Eastern Allies, Queensland failed to put a win on the board from their three matches but were in each of their matches. An inaccurate one point loss to Central Allies was likely the most painful for the side, which had plenty of opportunities to get in front but could not capitalise, whilst they were in the game for three quarters against the undefeated Vic Metro. The Maroons had plenty of talent with the likes of Zimmorlei Farquharson providing an exciting prospect in the forward line with her athleticism, football nous and speed. Every time she went near the ball something electric happened sparking plenty of enthusiasm from the crowd. Meanwhile the likes of Lily Postlethwaite and Isabel Dawes were equally as impressive throughout the Championships. Their class and skill in and around the contest was second to none extracting the ball and using it effectively. Charlotte Hammans also displayed her ball winning abilities throughout the series to have an impact for her side along with Serene Watson who proved to be crucial for Queensland at times. Another key player for Queensland and the MVP was Ellie Hampson who imposed herself at each and every contest using her body well to win the ball and bomb it out of congestion but unfortunately it was not enough to register a win for Queensland.

Vic Country (3-0)

Results:
Vic Country 9.7 (61) def. Queensland 3.1 (19)
Vic Country 6.6 (42) def. Eastern Allies 2.0 (12)
Western Australia 3.5 (23) def. By Vic Country 3.7 (25)

MVP: Lucy McEvoy

Vic Country came away a solid contender in the Championships, notching up three wins with their best, a come-from-behind win on Friday against Western Australia while they racked up a 42-point win against Queensland earlier in the week. Country stood up when challenged backing themselves in the contest and fighting their way out of trouble thanks to the likes of MVP winner Lucy McEvoy who took the game on at every opportunity. The highly skilled player showed her versatility playing in each area of the ground and having a profound impact while the likes of Tyanna Smith and Sophie Molan also worked hard to win the ball. Middle-ager Olivia Barber was exciting for Country who valued her height and versatility throughout the Championships hitting the scoreboard more than once and constantly providing an option inside 50 with her marking strength. Renee Saulitis provided a spark up forward with her dynamic movement and goal sense while Millie Brown was also impressive across the series providing good run and carry off the back half. Shanara Notman had a number of highlights, hitting the scoreboard while Darcy Moloney also worked tirelessly for Vic Country winning the ball and creating forward forays.

Vic Metro (3-0)

Results:
Vic Metro 8.3 (51) def. Western Australia 5.4 (34)
Queensland 1.5 (11) def. by Vic Metro 4.5 (29)
Vic Metro 11.9 (75) def. Eastern Allies 0.3 (3)

MVP: Georgia Patrikios

Vic Metro were by large the most dominant of all the teams in the series, winning their first two matches by solid three-goal margins before posting a dominant 72-point victory over the Eastern Allies on Friday to close out their tournament. They oozed strength and skill across the field making them tough opponents throughout the Championship. Metro have no shortage of ball winners with the likes of Gabby Newton and Georgia Patrikios both able to burrow down and extract the hard ball credit to their clean hands, slick movement and footy awareness. Ellie McKenzie offered plenty of spark with her brute strength and speed to evade would be tacklers and move the ball down the field with ease while the likes of Nell Morris-Dalton and Cleo Saxon-Jones relished the good ball movement from the strong midfield. Morris-Dalton and Saxon-Jones hit the scoreboard more then once throughout Championships thanks to their accuracy in front of goal while Emily Harley also made her presence felt in the forward half. Laura McClelland showed her versatility throughout the series while Felicity Theodore used her speed to create good space for Metro. Alana Barba played her role for Vic Metro while the likes of Gemma Lagioia and Elisabeth Georgostathis bobbed up for patches throughout the Championships to impact the play.

Western Australia (1-2)

Results:
Vic Metro 8.3 (51) def. Western Australia 5.4 (34)
Western Australia 5.2 (32) def. Central Allies 1.4 (10)
Western Australia 3.5 (23) def. By Vic Country 3.7 (25)

MVP: Mikayla Bowen

Western Australia were one of the most exciting sides all week, producing some impressive performances but unfortunately only getting the one win on the board against the Central Allies on Wednesday. Though they put both Vic Metro and Vic Country through their paces, they lacked consistency at times which was ultimately the catalyst for their defeat. WA showed glimpses of brilliance moving the ball with pace and precision down the field but lapses such as the start of their clash with Vic Metro, and the second half against Vic Country cost them from going undefeated this year. In saying that there were plenty of star players for the Black Ducks who proved that they have what it takes to match it with the best and cause headaches for opposition teams. Roxanne Roux left her mark on the Championships taking some huge grabs and putting her body on the line time and time again to win the hard ball. Roux showed great elevation throughout the Championships to contest the ball in the air but also following up her work at ground level. Mim Strom was crucial for WA with her impressive taps and strength in the ruck providing her side with first access to the ball with the likes of MVP winner Mikayla Bowen reaping the rewards of her work. Bowen had an impressive Championship showcasing her clean hands in close while Nyra Anderson dazzled with her pace and tackling intent. Taylor Pescud, Rebecca Viney and Mikayla Morrison all had their moments for Western Australia going in hard when necessary to extract the ball.