Tag: kaine baldwin

2020 SANFL season preview: Can the Bays go back-to-back?

LAST year saw a drought-breaking year in the South Australian National Football League (SANFL) with Glenelg taking home its first League premiership since 1986. The Tigers were able to bounce back from a loss earlier in the finals series to take out Port Adelaide in the grand final last year. The result also meant seven of the eight non-AFL affiliated clubs have won SANFL titles this turn of the century with only South Adelaide (1964) holding a drought longer than a decade from those sides. We take a look at the eight sides in contention for the 2020 SANFL premiership in order of ladder position last year (minus Adelaide and Port Adelaide).

GLENELG

Finished: Premiers
Wins: 13
Draws: 2
Losses: 3
Best & Fairest: Jesse White
Leading Goalkicker: Liam McBean & Luke Reynolds (53)

The reigning premiers return to the competition as deserving favourites in the new year, as the likes of Margarey Medallist Luke Partington and reigning leading goalkickers, Liam McBean and Luke Reynolds back in the yellow and black.

Over the off-season, the Bays have been able to bring in some young talent including former Crow Jackson Edwards who returns to South Australia, ex-Sydney Academy talent Luke Parks, and Greater Western Victoria (GWV) Rebels forward, Mitch Martin. Unfortunately young star Kaine Baldwin will miss the season through another anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. However, the Tigers have every reason to be buoyant about the season ahead.

After all, their list of ex-AFL talent is quite impressive, with names such as Cory Gregson and Billy Stretch alongside Luke Edwards. Expect the Tigers to be the team to beat in 2020.

STURT

Finished: 4th
Wins: 11
Draws: 0
Losses: 7
Best & Fairest: Sam Colquhoun
Leading Goalkicker: Josh Hone (35)

The Double Blues will be confident of a rise up the ladder in 2020 with a couple of handy pickups including talented high-flyer Jordan Houlahan who returns from the AFL, as well as another ex-Cat and Crow, Dean Gore.

Tom Lewis will provide some extra youth and inside hardness alongside the likes of outside movers, Josh Shute and Mihail Lochowiak who have been impressive in past years. Sam Colquhoun has been a star of the competition of late, and with last year’s leading goalkicker Josh Hone also coming back for 2020, Sturt will be competitive once again.

They have a lost a fair chunk of talent over the off-season including ex-AFL talent Danyle Pearce who opted to retire alongside four others including Jack Stephens and Fraser Evans. The Double Blues will likely need to time to adjust in the season.

NORWOOD

Finished: 5th
Wins: 11
Draws: 7
Losses: 0
Best & Fairest: Brad McKenzie
Leading Goalkicker: Peter Bampton (31)

The experience of the Redlegs after a grand final appearance the year before did not end up helping them get past the first week of finals in 2019. They have some serious big names on their list from best and fairest winner Brad McKenzie, to the likes of form AFL-listed talents Dom Barry, Lewis Johnston and Mitch Grigg.

A 2020 recruit in Daniel Johnston will help add some extra height to the side, and provide some firepower alongside the likes of Matthew Panos and Peter Bampton up forward. The biggest inclusion is former Crow, Richard Douglas, who should immediately be in the top five players across the league, whilst another ex-AFL talent in Ryan Bastinac announced yesterday that he would be joining the Redlegs after initially pulling out of the league due to commitments.

If the inclusions are anything to go by, Norwood will be the biggest threat to Glenelg’s crown and could well go all the way if their players remain fit throughout the season.

SOUTH ADELAIDE

Finished: 6th
Wins: 9
Draws: 2
Losses: 7
Best & Fairest: Joel Cross
Leading Goalkicker: Joel Cross (26)

All eyes will be on the Panthers in season 2020 as they try and crack into the top four on the back of some savvy recruiting. Former AFL talent, Matthew Broadbent will help South Adelaide to try and mount a case to rise up the ladder.

Along with the experienced duo, Canberra’s Tom Highmore and Sydney Swans Academy’s Ky McGrath were both vying for draft selection last year, and will be among those looking to take over from a number of Double Blues stars who have left the club. With Brad Crabb and Nick Liddle both exiting, Mark Noble joining his brother in Victoria and Emmanuel Ira also on the out, the main role of the recruits will be to support Joel Cross with some extra depth through the team.

Cross won both the leading goalkicker and best and fairest award last season, and with a young side that has a number of South Australians coming through the state team, the Panthers would be keen to bring through their next crop of players.

WWT EAGLES

Finished: 7th
Wins: 8
Draws: 0
Losses: 10
Best & Fairest: Jordan Foote
Leading Goalkicker: James Rowe (35)

The Under 18s premiers have now lost their array of young talent to the AFL, with the likes of Kysaiah Pickett, Jackson Mead and Harry Schoenberg among those who landed on AFL lists last year. They have brought in Kai Pudney and Mitch Mead from Port Adelaide’s SANFL side, whilst the big recruit might be Liam Buxton from Casey Demons.

It will be an interesting season for the Eagles who have some genuine elite talents through the side, including best and fairest winner Jordan Foote – an ex-AFL talent himself – and small forward James Rowe who made the transition to senior footy seamlessly.

They should be among the mid-table log-jam of teams to battle for a top four place, and with the senior experience still on the list after a seventh placed finish last year, they could well get it done whilst other teams are still trying to gel.

CENTRAL DISTRICT

Finished: 8th
Wins: 5
Draws: 0
Losses: 13
Best & Fairest: Jarrod Schiller
Leading Goalkicker: Troy Menzel (33)

One of the potential bigger improvers in season 2020, Central District has acquired the services of a second Menzel brother with Dan joining Troy at the Bulldogs. Troy was huge last season winning the leading goalkicker award and now the double trouble of the goalsneaks will make life difficult for the opposition. The big question mark will be losing the Neagle trio in Jydon, Jaxon and Matthew back to Wodonga.

Through the midfield, the other brother combination in Jarrod and Travis Schiller will be tough to combat again, whilst former Tiger, Ben Nason has crossed from Woodville-West Torrens. The Bulldogs have also brought in some big ball winners from Victoria, with Murray Bushrangers’ Cam Wild and Dandenong Stingrays’ Jack Toner joining the club along with former Stingrays’ goalsneak Jai Nanscawen for the 2020 season.

Given the talent on the list and two less sides, it would be a near-certainty that the Bulldogs reach the finals.

NORTH ADELAIDE

Finished: 9th
Wins: 4
Draws: 1
Losses: 13
Best & Fairest: Aidan Tropiano
Leading Goalkicker: Lewis Hinder (28)

The ninth placed Roosters have added some extra firepower in 2020 with the recruitment of former Adelaide and Gold Coast ball-winner Harrison Wigg and ex-Hawk and Roo, Billy Hartung. Along with another ex-AFL player in Andrew Moore, and hopefully a full season out of former Port Adelaide goalsneak Jake Neade, and the Roosters will look to rise up the ladder again.

Last year’s reigning premiers were always going to have a tough season after starting on negative points due to the 19th man saga, and losing a number of players to AFL level. They have gained one back in Robbie Young returning to the club. Unlucky overagers not to be drafted last year, Karl Finlay and Dyson Hilder are back again and provide some height in the defensive end.

The recruits will need to take over from Aidan Tropiano who has headed west this season. The Roosters will rise up and expect them to contend for finals again.

WEST ADELAIDE

Finished: 10th
Wins: 2
Draws: 0
Losses: 16
Best & Fairest: Logan Hill
Leading Goalkicker: Jono Beech (21)

The only way is up for the Bloods and with a number of solid recruits alongside the potential number one AFL Draft pick, West Adelaide has what it takes to get off the bottom of the ladder. Riley Thilthorpe will be a much talked about name this year and the talented tall will get plenty of time in the League side in 2020.

The Bloods have also recruited a couple of over-agers and former Sydney Swans Academy members Hamish Ellem and Kyle Martin to provide some strength in attack. With Bailey Chamberlain another talented top-age teenager in the line-up, it will take some of the pressure off the likes of 2019 best and fairest winner, Logan Hill, as well as ex-Hawk Dallas Willsmore.

No doubt it will still be a tough year for the senior side with so many huge recruits to a number of other sides, but the youth in the team will give the Bloods great depth and help out across the board. They will need to overcome the losses of Jono Beech and Chris Schmidt this season who were both huge contributors to the team.

Draft Central predictions:

Premiers: Norwood
Runners-Up: Glenelg
Big Improver: North Adelaide

2020 SANFL club preview: Glenelg

GLENELG took the SANFL by storm in 2019, winning the clubs first league premiership in 33-years. The Tigers recruited well in the off-season, luring several former-players back to the club to bolster an already-talented lineup. Under coach Mark Stone, Glenelg appear well positioned to defender their crown in season 2020.

>>> CHECK OUT OUR GLENELG TEAM PAGE

>>> SANFL WOMEN’S GLENELG TEAM UPDATE

LEAGUE/RESERVES:

Glenelg certainly did not rest on its laurels in the off-season, bringing in a number of handy additions with AFL experience. Premiership captain Chris Curran departed the club, with fellow defender Max Proud set to fulfil the leadership responsibilities. Former Magpie and Swan Jesse White announced his retirement, teenager Will Gould headed north after being drafted by Sydney and Brad Close was picked up by Geelong. Josh Scott and Aaron Joseph also departed the club. Former Crow Jackson Edwards returned from Werribee to add more talent to a strong midfield core. Billy Stretch and Curtis McCarthy returned from Victoria and Matt Allen from West Coast. The ruck stocks also received a welcome boost with the signing of former Docker Jack Hannath. The Tigers also recruited youngsters Mitch Martin (GWV Rebels), Angus Cole (Bendigo Pioneers) and Luke Parks (Sydney Swans Academy).

Reigning Margarey Medalist Luke Partington is the headline act of the yellow and black on-ball brigade. Partington was simply brilliant last season, averaging 29 disposals (82 per cent efficiency), 4.4 marks, 5.5 tackles and 4.9 clearances. Matthew Snook, Brad Agnew and Jonty Scharenberg were all integral to the the Bays premiership success, with the former taking out the Jack Oatey Medal as best on ground in the grand final. Agnew laid 34 tackles in the Bays three finals and has emerged as a midfield aggressor. The inside grunt will be balanced out by the silky skills and class of Marlon Motlop. Recruits Stretch and Edwards are expected to further compliment the Bays outside presence. Up forward, dangerous duo Liam McBean and Luke Reynolds combined for 91 goals last season. McBean took out the Ken Farmer Medal by one goal, over medium-tall Reynolds. The energy and defensive pressure of Cory Gregson will again prove invaluable to the Tigers forward-line. Elsewhere, Former Docker Matthew Uebergang and Max Proud form a strong key defensive partnership, whilst Andrew Bradley has proven his worth in a number of roles over the years.

Glenelg’s reserves finished the regular season in fifth spot, earning them a finals berth. However they were easily accounted for by Central District in the first elimination. With a host of talented youngsters waiting in the wings, Glenelg will be hoping to make it deeper into the finals in 2020.

UNDER-18S:

Potential Crows father-son Luke Edwards, talented tall forward Kaine Baldwin and skilful utility Cooper Horsnell headline the Bays under-18 prospects for the upcoming season. Edwards featured prominently during last year’s National Championships, displaying plenty of football smarts and poise off the half-back line for South Australia. Strongly-built key forward Baldwin played just one match last season before rupturing his anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). A genuine leader, scouts will certainly not have forgotten Baldwin’s terrific aerial prowess, strength and scoreboard impact. Horsnell has impressed onlookers with his courage and precise foot skills. All three are likely to be drafted and could make a push for senior debuts in 2020.

>>> GET TO KNOW GLENELG UNDER 18S

>>> LUKE EDWARDS AFL DRAFT WATCH

>>> KAINE BALDWIN AFL DRAFT WATCH

>>> MARQUEE MATCHUPS: CONNOR DOWNIE VS. LUKE EDWARDS

>>> MARQUEE MATCHUPS: KAINE BALDWIN VS. DENVER GRAINGER-BARRAS

Marquee Matchup: Kaine Baldwin vs. Denver Grainger-Barras

DESPITE remaining in the unknown of football’s temporary absence, Draft Central is set to ramp up its draft analysis with another new prospect-focused series, Marquee Matchups. We take a look at some of the high-end head-to-head battles which look likely to take place should the class of 2020 take the field, comparing pairs of draft hopefuls to help preview who may come out on top.

The next pair under the microscope hail from South and Western Australia respectively, with Glenelg’s Kaine Baldwin and Swan Districts’ Denver Grainger-Barras pitted against one another. Entering the key position department, Baldwin is an strong key forward who is near-unstoppable in the air and covers the ground well, while Grainger-Barras is a versatile defender who can play the lockdown role just as easily as an intercepting or third-up type. Unfortunately, both suffered injuries across their bottom-age year, with Baldwin ruled out after his first outing for 2019 with an ACL injury, and Grainger-Barras requiring shoulder surgery in the back half of the year.

Having both contributed to the spine of the 2018 Under 16 All Australian squad, this looms as a classic key forward versus key defender matchup which will likely take place at some point should the two run out for their respective states in the 2020 Under 18 National Championships. Without further ado, get up to speed with how the two match-up in terms of their form to date, strengths, improvements, and what has already been said about their performances in our scouting notes.

PLAYER PAGES

Kaine Baldwin
Glenelg/South Australia

DOB: May 30, 2002

Height: 193cm
Weight: 92kg

Position: Key forward

Denver Grainger-Barras
Swan Districts/Western Australia

DOB: April 17, 2002

Height: 195cm
Weight: 78kg

Position: Key defender

ATHLETIC PROFILES

VERTICAL JUMP

Baldwin – 62cm
Grainger-Barras
– 63cm

RUNNING VERTICAL JUMP (R/L)

Baldwin – 77cm/71cm
Grainger-Barras
– 78cm/74cm

SPEED (20m)

Baldwin – 3.18 seconds
Grainger-Barras
– 3.08 seconds

AGILITY

Baldwin – 8.54 seconds
Grainger-Barras
– 8.19 seconds

ENDURANCE (Yo-yo)

Baldwin – 20.8
Grainger-Barras
– 20.8

For players who are regarded as key position prospects at the junior level, they are both quite impressive athletically. Keeping in mind that Baldwin’s testing results came at the end of a year-long rehabilitation for his knee injury, he stacks up quite nicely. The aggressive forward returned a very respectable 20.8 yo-yo test score – identical to Grainger-Barras’ effort – which will only get better as he continues to rebuild and improve his tank.

Both athletes’ aerial prowess is reflected in their very even vertical jump scores, able to breach the 70cm mark off both feet off a rolling start, and 60cm standing. Grainger-Barras fared slightly better across the speed and agility tests, posting terrific times for a player of true key position height. Again, considering Baldwin is coming off a long-term knee injury, his agility time of 8.54 seconds is impressive, and the underwhelming 3.18-second 20-metre sprint can be excused as he usually covers the ground well over time and has decent pace off the lead.

>> PRESEASON TESTING RESULTS:

20m Sprint
Agility Test
Yo-yo Test
Jumps

ON-FIELD PROFILES

STATISTICS

Baldwin:

2018 SANFL UNDER 16s: 5 games | 21 disposals | 9.6 marks | 1.6 tackles | 4.4 inside 50s | 2.8 goals (14)

Grainger-Barras:

2019 WAFL COLTS: 7 games | 10.1 disposals | 3.7 marks | 2.1 tackles
2019 UNDER 18 NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS: 2 games | 12 disposals | 7 marks | 2 tackles | 2.5 rebound 50s

It is obviously difficult to compare statistics here given they have been extracted from different years and age levels, with Baldwin’s only game for 2019 cut short and at the SANFL Reserves level. Looking back at his SANFL Under 16 stats, and it is clear that Baldwin is a true centre-half forward, rather than that typically one-dimensional full forward. His ability to move up the ground and impact the play aerially is reflected in his averages of 21 disposals and 9.6 marks, while still maintaining a very good goal average of nearly three per game.

Grainger-Barras is just as capable in the air, but thrives more significantly in the sense that he can play his role so consistently well. He is a true defender’s defender, able to stop the opposition’s best key forward while breaking up the play with his reading of the ball in flight and marking skills. He may not see much of the ball, but typically uses it soundly and can get some rebound going on the back of his efficiency.

BEST GAME

Baldwin:

2018 SANFL Under 16s Rd 7 vs. Central District

29 disposals
11 marks (four contested)
2 tackles
6 inside 50s
4 goals

Grainger-Barras:

2019 Under 18 National Championships vs. Vic Country

13 disposals
8 marks
1 tackle
1 rebound 50

The contrast may seem stark in terms of pure numbers, but these two performances stack up fairly evenly when put into context. Baldwin’s best game was selected from his 2018 Under 16 campaign, in a massive win where he managed season-highs in disposals (29) and goals (four). He may not have showcased his contested marking as well as in other games but still managed four, and really conveyed his mobility as he impacted up the field. His versatility as a key position player also shone through, able to pinch hit in the ruck at the junior level.

Grainger-Barras may have returned bigger numbers across his WAFL Colts campaign and sole League outing, but this quality performance against good opposition at the Under 18 national carnival was simply too good to overlook. Against elite-level talent above his age grade, the 195cm defender played a terrific role floating across the back half, while also keeping tabs on the likes of Elijah Hollands. His marking game and reading of the play were exceptional, and it was a performance which only solidified his status as one to watch for this year.

STRENGTHS

Baldwin:

Contested marking
Aggression
Strength
Impact
Ground coverage

Grainger-Barras:

Reading the play
Intercept marking
Athleticism
Defensive versatility
Composure

Both players, putting it simply possess the key strength of marking well, but do so in different ways. While Baldwin is able to crash packs and use his strong hands to clunk marks under heavy duress, Grainger-Barras is slightly taller and uses his athleticism to get to an array of contests, moving efficiently to intercept in the air. The reading of the play and intercept marking aspects go hand-in-hand, and also add to his defensive versatility. As already mentioned, the West Australian can play the lockdown defensive role well, but has great composure on the ball and can deliver it well out of danger, with his ability to play as a second or third tall in defence another string to his bow.

Baldwin’s aggression and strength contribute to that key asset of contested marking, with few keen to step in the hole and get in the way of his 91kg frame. His ability to pull of eye-catching moments and have a say further afield play into his high-impact style, with goals a bonus to the overall package he delivers. Of course, ground coverage is something that comes with his ability to venture out as a centre-half forward, and will only improve as he builds that endurance after a long lay-off.

IMPROVEMENTS

Baldwin:

Durability
Unknown versatility

Grainger-Barras:

Endurance
Offensive output

It is perhaps harsh to put durability and endurance as improvements to be made for either player, especially given the parameters surrounding Baldwin. But being able to prove his durability will be key, although recruiters have shown faith in many prospects who suffered long-term injuries during key years of their development. The question of versatility comes from Baldwin’s height, just below true key position size for AFL standards. Given he is working on perhaps even moving into the midfield, gametime will be key to proving his potential in that area.

Grainger-Barras’ offensive output could help him become an even more versatile defensive outlet, with his ball use already at an outstanding level. If he can be let off the chain and showcase those traits more by winning more of the ball across the backline, he could be such a weapon coming out of defence. It seems as if we are clutching at straws and that is often the case with high-end prospects, but there is always room for improvement.

KEY SCOUTING NOTES

Baldwin:

2018 Under 16 National Championships vs. Vic Country

By: Michael Alvaro

Baldwin was another who had a greater impact than what his stat-line would suggest. His contested marking overhead was outstanding; both deeper forward in the first half, and higher up the ground as the game wore on. Baldwin found his way into the game in the second term when he booted his lone goal and missed the chance to add another within a minute. He continued on with an assist to Zac Dumesny in the third term before clunking a couple more contested marks to finish the day with seven overall from 15 disposals.

Grainger-Barras:

2019 Under 18 National Championships vs. Allies

By: Peter Williams

Another bottom-age tall who will hold the West Australian side in good stead for next year, he has some neat defensive and offensive attributes. He killed a contest at half-back with a great spoil across the line, and proceeded to be an intercepting defender throughout the game, saving a number of dangerous forward entries by dropping into the hole. Most importantly, he remained composed under pressure and looks like a promising prospect.

Squad predictions: 2020 South Australia Under 18s

THE annual Under 18 National Championships may be the only chance we get to catch a glimpse of the class of 2020 before draft day, with a decision on the recommencement of competition pushed back to at least September. In the meantime, Draft Central takes a look at how each regional squad may line up should the carnival come around, but with a few stipulations in place. Last week we began with our Vic Metro and Vic Country predictions, and today we take a look at South Australia’s (SA) potential line-up.

GUIDELINES:

  • Top-agers (2002-born) have been prioritised due to the limited season and exposure
  • Of those, AFL Academy Hub members also gain priority for the starting squad
  • Bottom-agers (2003-born) in the hub, and top-agers outside it are limited to a total of three spots
  • 19-year-old inclusions are also limited, having already staked their claims in previous years

A lot may change between now and when the squad will be announced, and it should be noted that players with known long-term injuries will not be picked here. Of course, the sides may vary greatly as players look to shift and develop in different positions, but each member has been selected based on the roles they have previously played. Given only previous form, preseason testing and scratch matches are what we have to go off, bolters are also difficult to gauge at this point.

Players named as depth outside of the initial squad below are inevitably options who will rotate through the side, and it is impossible to fit all the options within a list of 22. But without further ado, let’s get stuck into the third squad prediction, with SA’s talent broken down line-by-line.

* – denotes bottom-aged

DEFENCE

FB – Lachlan Jones, James Borlase, Isaiah Dudley*
HB – Will Schreiber, Jye Sinderberry, Zac Dumesny

Height looms as somewhat of an issue in our proposed defence, with versatile utility James Borlase the tallest of the lot at 189cm, joined in a key position post by the 188cm Jye Sinderberry. But that is not to say the chosen six lack in marking power or strength, with South Adelaide’s Zac Dumesny a capable interceptor, while Lachlan Jones adds a good amount of grunt with his 184cm/88kg frame.

Glenelg’s Will Schreiber adds to the back six’s solidity, while diminutive bottom-ager Isaiah Dudley can fill a pocket at either end on account of his ground level pressure. Should the SA coaches look toward a more conventional key position structure, Riley Thilthorpe is a tall option who can play just about anywhere, but will more likely be used as a ruck/forward. Luke Edwards is another half-back option having played there during last year’s Under 18s carnival.

MIDFIELD

C – Bailey Chamberlain, Luke Edwards, Tom Powell
FOL – Riley Thilthorpe, Jamison Murphy, Taj Schofield

The Croweaters lay claim to one of the stronger and more diverse midfield groups, and we are excited about how this one stacks up. It was tough to whittle down the options, but the balance of this six looks about right.

On the outside, Bailey Chamberlain and Tom Powell provide some real dash and athleticism, and will also be able to rotate through the centre bounces with their speed/agility combination. There may be a slight query on Powell’s endurance coming off spates of long-term injuries, but he was impressive during preseason testing.

Forming the centre bounce core is arguably a group of four midfielders, with Thilthorpe a dynamic ruck option who fares just as well at ground level. While he may feature as a key forward or utility at times as he improves his ruck craft, the range of other options in that department means he can be utilised around the ground.

A couple of potential father-sons make their move into the middle, with Edwards a big-bodied inside type who compliments the smooth moving Taj Schofield very well. Edwards, who is also a very capable defender is a must in the midfield given Jamison Murphy and the remaining candidates stand no taller than 180cm. Murphy’s hard-at-it style means he should have no troubles on the inside though, and provides a great story as a former Australian Under-17 cricket captain.

FORWARD

HF – Tariek Newchurch, Kaine Baldwin, Jason Horne*
FF – Corey Durdin, Henry Smith, Lachlan Grubb

There are a couple of players who are simply essential choices in the final team; with Under 16 Division 1 MVP Corey Durdin slotting into a pocket, and returning key forward Kaine Baldwin a lock across half-forward. It was tempting to slot Thilthorpe in at centre-half forward, but Baldwin is just as capable there at 193cm and 91kg.

172cm pocket-rocket, Durdin is a terrific midfielder at Under 18s level, but is sure to find a home as a small forward at the next level – as justified by his form in said position for Central Districts’ League side. Baldwin has not played any footy for over a year due to an ACL tear, but is a contested marking phenom who can also roam further afield.

He will likely be joined up the spine by Henry Smith, a raw tall option who marks the ball at its highest point at over 200cm. At his feet and alongside Durdin in our side is Lachlan Grubb, another who has entered the senior realm for Centrals’ Reserves side. He is an impressive athlete, much like silky Adelaide NGA prospect Tariek Newchurch. Last year’s State Under 16s captain and MVP Jason Horne rounds out the six, a player already accustomed to playing above his age group and one who may also feature through midfield.

INTERCHANGE

INT – Caleb Poulter, Mani Liddy, Nicholas Kraemer, Ned Carey

This was a very difficult bench to select with a bunch of line-calls, as will become obvious with the depth listed below. Ned Carey features as the lone key position option, able to fulfil a ruck-oriented role alongside the likes of Thilthorpe and Smith while resting forward.

Caleb Poulter is a dynamic option who could well have made it onto the half-forward flank, much like how Nicholas Kraemer could enter the midfield fray and Mani Liddy could be utilised on either of the said lines. Kraemer is one who can add some strength through the engine room, while Liddy could feature there too having previously been pushed out to the flanks.

TOP-AGE DEPTH

A pair of smalls who will likely rotate through the squad include Henry Nelligan and Cooper Horsnell. Nelligan is a midfielder who is never far away from the action, able to find the ball with ease at 170cm. Horsnell is the more forward-inclined of the two, able to find the goals while adding the string of wing play to his bow.

Another 200cm key position option, Zac Phillips is from the Woodville-West Torrens program and could get a look-in as ruck or key forward depth. An impressive utility who may also come into consideration is Riley Holder, who posted very impressive numbers for Glenelg in a range of roles at 190cm.

Aside from the Academy-listed top-agers mentioned above, Glenelg quartet Kye DeanLuke Pedlar, Jordan Moore, and Reid Kuller are names who have floated around the system, while Bulldogs pair Samuel Falland and Lewis Cowham may also be thereabouts, along with Norwood tall Sam Duke and West Adelaide’s Harvey Bock. There are of course, many others who will come under consideration, but the Academy group is quite strong and difficult to look past.

THE BOTTOM-AGERS

The top-agers for 2020 set the benchmark with a national carnival win in their Under 16s year, and while last year’s 16s crop could not achieve the same feat, there are certainly some bright talents who will feature in the future.

Cooper Murley and Matthew Roberts were equally difficult omissions from the starting squad given our stipulation of three bottom-agers, maximum, and a decent midfield core. An Under-16 All-Australian last year alongside Horne and Dudley, Murley is a highly talented small midfielder who can also move forward, while Roberts has similar versatility as a 182cm midfielder.

Arlo Draper and Lewis Rayson are another two bottom-aged prospects among the Academy ranks, and could both make a case for breaking into the side. Athletic tall forward Morgan Ferres could come into consideration among the key position ranks, though the stocks are already quite full in that department.

Harry Tunkin is a Prince Alfred College and Glenelg product who impressed at Under 16 level, while Port Adelaide father-son hopeful Jase Burgoyne is also coming through the ranks and could feature at some point before his top-age year.

>> SANFL U18 CLUB PAGES:

Central District // Preseason interviews
Glenelg // Preseason interviews
North Adelaide // Preseason interviews
Norwood // Preseason interviews
South Adelaide // Preseason interviews
Sturt // Preseason interviews
West Adelaide // Preseason interviews
WWT Eagles // Preseason interviews

>> SANFL U18 PLAYER FEATURES:

AFL Draft Watch:

Kaine Baldwin
Luke Edwards
Taj Schofield
Riley Thilthorpe

Marquee Matchups:

Durdin vs. Campbell

2020 AFL Draft Positional Analysis: Key Forwards

FOLLOWING a draft class somewhat short on pure key position forward options comes a cohort which has already shown promise in that exact area. Though they may not currently have the opportunity to show their worth on the field, exposed form and long preseasons for most allow for a window into how the current stocks stack up.

In ramping up our 2020 AFL Draft analysis, Draft Central begins its line-by-line positional breakdowns, starting with the big men. The following list features pocket profiles of top-age (2002-born) prospects who are part of their respective AFL Academy hubs, while also touching on some names who missed out last year, or may feature on another list.

Without further ado, get to know some of the premier key forwards who are eligible to be drafted in 2020.

Note: The list is ordered alphabetically, not by any form of ranking.

Kaine Baldwin (Glenelg/South Australia)
193cm | 91kg

A rare case in that he may well find his way into draft contention despite not playing any football for two seasons. Baldwin had cracked the SANFL Reserves level for Glenelg after an outstanding Under 16 national carnival, but unfortunately went down with an untimely ACL injury in 2019. A year of recovery has him ready to go though, and a 20.8 yo-yo test score in preseason suggests he is building back the running ability that sets him apart. Baldwin’s contested marking is also eye-catching, utilising his strong frame to split packs. He comes in lightly below true key position height, so is also working on moving further afield.

>> DRAFT WATCH: Kaine Baldwin


Jackson Callow (Tasmania/Allies)

193cm | 95kg

A traditional, hulking key forward who thrives on the physical aspect of the game. Callow was a standout for Tasmania at Under 16 level, and more recently in the NAB League having booted 24 goals from 14 games for the Devils in 2019. At 95kg, he is well built and hardly beaten one-on-one, but also has the clean hands and speed to mark strongly at full tilt. Callow has garnered heavy opposition attention thus far as Tasmania’s spearhead, but does not hold back on the aggression to shake it off. He can work on sometimes reigning that aspect of his game in, while also sharpening his consistency in front of goal.

>> MARQUEE MATCHUP: Callow vs. Fleeton


Josh Eyre (Calder Cannons/Vic Metro)

197cm | 85kg

Eyre is an Essendon Next Generation Academy (NGA) member who is still quite raw, but has some terrific attributes. Having endured his share of injuries across the last two seasons, Eyre has grown to a more traditional key position height and is filling out nicely. Those extra centimetres and an added five kilograms since the start of last year point towards Eyre featuring as a centre half-forward in 2020, though he is able to play up either end or even on a wing. An exciting one for Bombers fans, who have some worthy academy talents coming through the ranks.

>> Q&A: Josh Eyre


Ollie Lord (Sandringham Dragons/Vic Metro)

195cm | 83kg

The Sandringham product came on strongly last season, featuring across five games for Sandringham in between his Geelong Grammar commitments, while also running out for Vic Metro’s Under 17 side. Lord is an athletic tall who sits at the precipice of true key position size, with his leap and high marking the most prominent features of his game. Still very much a developing type, the 18-year-old did well to crack into Sandringham’s side last year given its plethora of tall options. Trained at Melbourne during the off-season, and should make up part of Vic Metro’s spine in 2020.

>> Q&A: Ollie Lord


Logan McDonald (Perth/Western Australia)

195cm | 85kg

Another standout from the 2018 Under 16 carnival, McDonald has since shown plenty of the same potential having represented the Black Ducks at Under 18 level in 2019 as a bottom-ager. The Perth product has grown to key position size over the past year, and is one of the leading candidates in his role on the back of his ability to cover the ground well, clunk strong marks on the lead, and most importantly, find the goals. Has great endurance for a player of his size, notching a score of 21.3 on the preseason yo-yo test.

>> DRAFT WATCH: Logan McDonald


Liam McMahon (Northern Knights/Vic Metro)

193cm | 80kg

A developing forward who shot into calculations for representative honours, McMahon is perhaps a prospect who finds himself measuring up at an in-between size. While he certainly plays like a key forward with his terrific leap and sticky hands on the lead, McMahon does not have the height or weight of some of the other forwards on this list – perhaps suiting more of a third tall option at the elite level. Still, he averaged almost a goal per game over 15 NAB League outings in 2019 and should be another to feature in Vic Metro’s starting side.

>> FEATURE: Liam McMahon


Riley Thilthorpe (West Adelaide/South Australia)

200cm | 98kg

One of the most exciting draft prospects and a candidate to be taken first off the board is West Adelaide’s Thilthorpe, who mixes his time between the ruck and centre half-forward. The South Australian already has experience at SANFL League level and at 200cm and 98kg, is a readymade key position player. Thilthorpe’s running capacity is elite for a player of his size, with his aerial presence and impact around the ground also desirable assets. He could develop into a modern day ruck who plays like a fourth midfielder, or become a swingman given his high ceiling.

>> GET TO KNOW: West Adelaide U18s


Josh Treacy (Bendigo Pioneers/Vic Country)

193cm | 95kg

Another more traditional key forward is Treacy, one of Bendigo’s leading prospects. The well built centre half-forward is not afraid to throw his weight around and is aggressive both in his leading and ground-level presence. While that aggression can sometimes land him in trouble, the 193cm Pioneer has shown there is more to his game. Speaking of, Treacy was spotted at a few centre bounces last year, so may even be poised for a move up the ground given he lacks the height of others in this category.

>> FEATURE: Josh Treacy


Jamarra Ugle-Hagan (Oakleigh Chargers/Vic Country)

194cm | 83kg

Arguably the most talked about draft prospect to this point has been Ugle-Hagan, a candidate to join the exclusive number one pick list, and a Western Bulldogs NGA product. The Warrnambool native formerly represented the Greater Western Victoria region, but has since relocated to Oakleigh’s zone given he boards at Scotch College. Ugle-Hagan is remarkably athletic, testing well across all areas during pre-season and proving just why he is near-unbeatable at full flight. His breakaway speed on the lead and high marking are outstanding, though Ugle-Hagan will be working on his field kicking and consistency in front of goal. Has also played in defence at times, but looks most comfortable up forward.

>> DRAFT WATCH: Jamarra Ugle-Hagan


OTHERS TO CONSIDER

Among the others to consider are a good number of prospects who missed out on being drafted last year as top-agers, and 2020-eligible players who may well find their way onto other lists – position-wise.

Sandringham over-ager Felix Flockart is a mobile 200cm bolter who can play forward or through the ruck, and will be one to watch when/if football returns having impressed during pre-season.

Another in that category is Northern’s Liam Kolar, who has transferred some elite traits from an athletics and soccer background. The 194cm Knight has a high-level mix of speed and endurance, and looks promising with his lead-up work from the forward 50.

The likes of West Australian Shannon Neale, South Australia’s Zac Phillips, Ned Carey, and Henry Smith, and Victorian Jack Diedrich also came into consideration, but should feature on the list of rucks to later be analysed.

Dynamic NT Thunder Academy jet Joel Jeffrey can fulfil the high marking forward role, but is a touch undersized to be considered key position at this stage, while James Borlase and Sam Tucker are tall utilities who may feature more as defenders.

In terms of other 19-year-olds, Kobe Tozer is a likely type whose development has been restricted by injury, while 2019 Allies representative Liam Delahunty may look to stake his claim having crossed to Victoria from the GWS GIANTS Academy.

NAB Leaguers Jamieson Rossiter and Kyle Yorke are others who may get a second look as over-agers, while Charlie Dean is another who was poised to return in between VFL duties – though he may be utilised up the other end.

AFL Draft Watch: Luke Edwards (Glenelg/South Australia)

IN the build up to football eventually returning, Draft Central  takes a look at some of this year’s brightest names who have already represented their state at Under 17 or Under 18s level in 2019.

While plenty can change between now and then, we will provide a bit of an insight into players, how they performed at preseason testing, and some of our scouting notes on them from last year.

Next under the microscope in our AFL Draft watch is versatile Glenelg product Luke Edwards, who is eligible to be drafted by Adelaide under the father-son rule in 2020 given his father, Tyson‘s 321-game career with the Crows.

One of six Tigers to be named in the South Australian Academy Hub, Edwards is arguably the most credentialed of the lot having already featured at SANFL Reserves level, and in all four of South Australia’s Under 18 fixtures last year as a bottom-ager.

In 2020, the 187cm prospect will be looking to ply his trade more prominently through the engine room, utilising his solid frame and outstanding contested ball work after proving his worth as a rebounding half-back throughout 2019.

A lower back niggle prevented Edwards from completing a full preseason and participating in the fitness testing day, though he will be raring to go should the class of 2020 get back on the park.

PLAYER PAGE:

Luke Edwards

Height: 187.2cm
Weight: 80.7kg
Position: Inside midfielder/half-back

2019 SANFL U18 STATS: 8 games | 22.5 disposals | 4.4 marks | 5.8 tackles | 5.1 clearances | 4.6 inside 50s | 1 goal

2019 U18 NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS STATS: 4 games | 18.8 disposals | 4.3 marks | 3.3 tackles | 2.75 rebound 50s | 1.5 inside 50s

Strengths: Versatility, contested ball, reading the play, efficiency
Improvements: Explosive speed, contested marking

QUOTES FROM PRE-SEASON:

Preferred position… “(Midfield) is where I’ll probably be playing mostly through the state champs. But it’s obviously good to be able to be that versatile type of player – go through the mid, down back.

“I enjoy playing through the mid probably more, I find it easier than playing down back so hopefully through the mid a little bit more, find more of the ball which would be good.”

2020 goals… “Hopefully I can play some senior footy, play a couple of League games if that’s before state champs or after state champs. “Obviously I’ve got my older brother (Jackson) who’s come down again so if I could play with him as well that’d be pretty cool.

“And hopefully by the end of the year, get drafted but we’ll just wait and see what happens with that.”

Working on… “Probably just that contested marking if I want to go down back or if I want to go up forward. “Just being able to be that player who can run and crash a few packs like Kaine Baldwin and take some big marks, that’d be pretty cool.”

GET TO KNOW GLENELG’S UNDER 18s

SCOUTING NOTES:

Under 17 Futures All Star Game

By: Michael Alvaro

The potential Adelaide father-son has composure beyond his years and looks a versatile type. Starting in his usual half-back role, Edwards showed great poise in his disposal coming out of defence and worked hard to impact the play further afield once he had released the ball himself.

His intercept marking game was also sound, reading the ball well in flight to get in the right position on defensive wing. He is the accumulating type in the backline, but looks a different player once thrown into the midfield with his strong hands and frame allowing him to play that inside game.

Open Schools Cup Grand Final vs. PAC

By: Michael Alvaro

Adelaide fans would want to be keeping the potential father-son’s progress on the down-low, but he keeps on showing good signs of form. Edwards’ quick and clean hands in congestion were outstanding, flicking the ball out effectively to his runners and staying strong through the hips under tackling pressure.

He looked at home through the midfield but also chimed in down back with some rebounding kicks and showed good penetration when going long.

2019 Under 18 National Championships vs. Allies

By: Michael Alvaro

One of few bottom-agers in the SA squad but was again impressive in spurts. He found a spot in the back six throughout the carnival, but will become a good midfielder in time with his clean hands and strong frame.

Edwards had a shaky moment early with a pretty bad turnover by foot on defensive wing, but would make amends later in the game with some clean gathers off the deck and improved composure inside defensive 50 as the game wore on.

2019 Under 18 Championships vs. Vic Country

By: Craig Byrnes

The son of former Adelaide champion Tyson, Luke is a potential father-son option for next year, but speculation continues to grow that he may opt to nominate for the open draft.

He again found himself behind the ball on Friday, intercepting, rebounding and often starting dangerous scoring chains. He took an excellent intercept mark in the third term which set up a goal for his team at a vital time.

2019 Under 18 National Championships vs. Vic Metro

By: Sophie Taylor

At 187cm he is a good size which allows him to compete strongly one-on-one against the top-aged boys. With 18 disposals, Edwards had no issues finding the football.

He generally used it well, playing across half-back (at times stationing himself in ‘the hole’ in-front of the key forwards) and also in an inside midfield role. Dribbled home a goal in the third term in an attempt to kickstart SA after half-time.

AFL Draft Watch: Kaine Baldwin (Glenelg/South Australia)

IN the build up to football eventually returning, Draft Central  takes a look at some of this year’s brightest names who have already represented their state at Under 17 or Under 18s level in 2019. While plenty can change between now and then, we will provide a bit of an insight into players, how they performed at preseason testing, and some of our scouting notes on them from last year.

Next under the microscope in our AFL Draft watch is bustling Glenelg key forward Kaine Baldwin, who comes into his top-age year somewhat untapped after going down with an ACL injury in his first outing for 2019.

That game came at the Reserves level for Glenelg, with the highly-touted youngster showing enough during an impactful Under-16 campaign with South Australia, and then back at The Den to warrant selection.

Baldwin is renowned for his contested marking and attack on the ball in flight, crashing packs with his big frame and sticking marks with his strong hands. But the soon-to-be 18-year-old has more strings to his bow than pure brawn, with his ability to push further afield making him a true modern day key forward.

Being a touch under the standard key position height at 193cm, Baldwin is now looking at potentially expanding his game with midfield craft as he continues his journey toward recapturing the form which thrust him onto the AFL draft radar in 2018.

PRESEASON TESTING HIGHLIGHTS:

Agility: 8.54 seconds (Above Average)
Running Vertical Jump:
77cm (Above Average)
Endurance: 20.8 (Average)

PLAYER PAGE:

Kaine Baldwin

Height: 193.4cm
Weight: 91.8kg
Position: Key Forward

2018 SANFL U16/18 STATS: 6 games | 21.2 disposals | 9.1 marks | 1.8 tackles | 4.6 inside 50s | 2.5 goals

Strengths: Contested marking, aggression, strength, impact
Improvements: Durability, unknown versatility

QUOTES FROM PRE-SEASON:

2020 Goals… “I think my main focus is just the championships, especially because that’s pretty early – I’ll only really have a month or two of footy under my belt before that. Hopefully I can perform well there and we can get a win as a team as well.”

Potential role change… “I’d really like to keep working (as a key forward) and see how I go with that, but also to start looking at some more midfield craft as well being a bit shorter than maybe some more natural key forwards.”

Rehab… “I’ve been working through my rehab with my ACL and progressing as my physio and doctor tell me, so I’m pretty excited to get back and probably looking for a return early in the year.”

GET TO KNOW GLENELG’S UNDER 18s

SCOUTING NOTES:

2018 Under 16 National Championships vs. Vic Metro

By: Michael Alvaro

Baldwin was another who had a greater impact than what his stat-line would suggest. His contested marking overhead was outstanding; both deeper forward in the first half, and higher up the ground as the game wore on. Baldwin found his way into the game in the second term when he booted his lone goal and missed the chance to add another within a minute. He continued on with an assist to Zac Dumesny in the third term before clunking a couple more contested marks to finish the day with seven overall among 15 disposals.

Get to know: SANFL U18s – Glenelg

GLENELG has long been a successful producer of junior talent, and its league-high six representatives in this year’s South Australian Under 18 academy hub prove just that. Draft Central was lucky enough to catch up with half of that crop at the 2020 South Australian pre-season testing day hosted by Rookie Me, and with footy momentarily on hold, bring to you everything you need to know, to get to know the next generation of South Australian stars.

What better place to start than at the Den, which boasts the likes of Luke Edwards and Kaine Baldwin at the forefront of its stacked junior program. Edwards, a potential Adelaide father-son made the rare feat of playing all four national championship games for the Tri-Colours as a bottom-ager in 2019, and has been touted as a top 10 pick. Typically up the other end of the ground, the big-bodied Baldwin was instrumental in the Croweaters’ carnival-winning Under 16 campaign two years ago, but missed his bottom-age year having torn an ACL. See what the pair, and talented small Cooper Horsnell had to say in the wake of their 2020 season, on a range of topics.

Note, Edwards sat out the testing, but Baldwin continued his successful return from injury with promising results in the agility (8.54), running vertical jump (77cm), and yo-yo tests (20.8).

EDWARDS, BALDWIN, AND HORSNELL ON…


TESTING DAY:

Edwards – “It’s a pretty long day to be honest but it’s a good day, good to get around the boys and interact with other clubs as well… “I’m injured today so I haven’t really done anything but if anything I’m just trying to improve my 20m (sprint) time so that’d probably be the test.”

Baldwin – “It’s been interesting. “It’s been good to see where I’m at and where all the other boys are at as well, especially at Glenelg I think we’re looking good for the year.”

Horsnell – “Not too bad, it’s been a bit of a wait to get from different tests but we’re at the Yo-yo test now so once that’s done, we get to go home. “I think the Yo-yo is probably my strength – my fitness going up and down. I think I’ve had a pretty good pre-season so can get a good score and show that out here.


THE STATE UNDER 18 HUB:

Baldwin – “Obviously some of my best mates are from Glenelg so (I’m looking forward to playing with) Luke Edwards… James Borlase, I could name the whole team. “They’re all a good bunch of blokes and we’ve bonded really well together in the hub program so far this year.”

Horsnell – “It’s been really good, especially last year in the 18s with guys like Dylan Stephens and Will Gould, being around them and seeing how they train has been really good. “A bit of an eye-opener for this year which has been good… “(I look forward to playing with) Riley Thilthorpe, a big, tall ruckman. “And definitely Luke Edwards, I’ve played with him for a bit but he’s always good to play with, we’re good mates so I like playing with him.”


2020 GOALS:

Edwards – “Hopefully I can play some senior footy, play a couple of League games if that’s before state champs or after state champs. “Obviously I’ve got my older brother (Jackson) who’s come down again so if I could play with him as well that’d be pretty cool. And hopefully by the end of the year, get drafted but we’ll just wait and see what happens with that.”

Baldwin – “I think my main focus is just the championships, especially because that’s pretty early – I’ll only really have a month or two of footy under my belt before that. Hopefully I can perform well there and we can get a win as a team as well.”

Horsnell – “I’m training with the seniors down at Glenelg now so hopefully playing a bit of senior footy. (I’ll) start off in the Reserves but see if I can put my name up there for League selection, and hopefully state champs as well.”


ROLES:

Edwards – “(Midfield) is where I’ll probably be playing mostly through the state champs. But it’s obviously good to be able to be that versatile type of player – go through the mid, down back. “I enjoy playing through the mid probably more, I find it easier than playing down back but hopefully through the mid a little bit more, find more of the ball which would be good.”

Baldwin – “I’d really like to keep working (as a key forward) and see how I go with that, but also to start looking at some more midfield craft as well being a bit shorter than maybe some more natural key forwards. “But besides that, key forward is probably my strength and I’ll continue to work on that.”

Horsnell – “I think moving up onto the wing a little more this year, get up the ground a little bit more, get involved and get the ball in my hands a little bit more hopefully. “It gives me a bit more flexibility too, to play two different roles (forward and wing) as well so yeah, looking forward to that.”


WORKING ON…

Edwards – “Probably just that contested marking if I want to go down back or if I want to go up forward. “Just being able to be that player who can run and crash a few packs like Kaine Baldwin and take some big marks, that’d be pretty cool.”

Baldwin – “I guess a day like this is probably a good indicator for me, just working on speed and agility and just becoming more mobile and versatile so I can play more positions.”


INJURIES:

Edwards – “It’s not major, it’s just a little bit of a lower back (issue). “It’s just been out for a little while, for about two weeks now but I should be back pretty soon hopefully.”

Baldwin –  “I’ve been working through my rehab with my ACL and progressing as my physio and doctor tell me, so I’m pretty excited to get back and probably looking for a return early in the year.”

Clubs evenly represented in South Australian state AFL Academy

SOUTH Australia’s next batch of talent has been identified after 30 of the brightest future stars were named in the 30-player South Australian AFL Academy squad. Glenelg and Woodville-West Torrens have the most representatives with five players named in the academy, while North Adelaide and Sturt had four representatives each. West Adelaide, South Adelaide and Central District have three players each in the academy, while Norwood had two players named. Western Australia club, Subiaco even had a player named, with 2020 draft eligible talent, Taj Schofield relocating to South Australia – following his father, Port Adelaide assistant coach Jarrad Schofield – and making the squad.

Among those included in the squad are bottom-age stars, Will Gould, Cameron Tahey, Dylan Stephens and Daniel Sladojevic, as well as father-son prospects, Trent Burgoyne and Jackson Mead, and 2020 father-son prospect, Luke Edwards. 2018 Kevin Sheehan Medallist, Corey Durdin has also made the academy.

The South Australian AFL Academy will come together for its first camp on November 30-December 4, with players having access to high performance programs, with South Australian Under-18 title-winning coach, Tony Bamford to lead the Academy.

AFL Head of Talent Tristan Salter said it is an exciting time for the country’s best young talent.

“The new approach to the national Academy will ensure more of our most talented players have access to AFL facilities, while receiving the best quality coaching, high performance and wellbeing services in the country,” he said.

“Importantly these players will spend more time in their home state, with year-round first-class support that will enhance their opportunity to perform at an elite level through the NAB AFL Under-18 Championships.

“I congratulate all who have been named in squads today and I look forward to watching their development over the next 12-24 months.”

South Australia

Kaine Baldwin             Glenelg/Westminster College
Trent Burgoyne           Woodville West Torrens/Henley High School
Jamie Coff                   Woodville West Torrens/Salisbury High
Will Day                       West Adelaide/Sacred Heart College
Zachary Dumesny       South Adelaide/Sacred Heart College
Corey Durdin               Central District/Tyndale Christian School
Luke Edwards             Glenelg/Henley High School
Karl Finlay                   North Adelaide/Prince Alfred College
Damon Freitag            South Adelaide/KICE Kingscote Campus
Oliver Grivell               Sturt/Concordia
Will Gould                   Glenelg/Prince Alfred College
Joshua Hart                North Adelaide/University of South Australia
Dyson Hilder               North Adelaide/Blackfriars Primary School
Cooper Horsnell          Glenelg/Henley High School
Jed McEntee               Sturt/Mercedes College
Anzac Lochowiak        Sturt/Rostrevor College
Lachlan McNeil           Woodville West Torrens/Henley High School
Harrison Magor           North Adelaide/St Mark’s College
Jackson Mead             Woodville West Torrens/Henley High School
Jordan O’Brien            Central District/Salisbury High
Kysaiah Pickett           Woodville West Torrens/Prince Alfred College
Taj Schofield               Subiaco/Sorrento Duncraig
Oliver Shaw                Central District/Pedare Christian College
Brady Searle               Glenelg/Brighton High School
Joshua Shute              Sturt/Rostrevor
Jye Sinderberry           West Adelaide/Unley High School
Daniel Sladojevic        South Adelaide /Scotch College
Dylan Stephens          Norwood/St Peter’s College
Cameron Taheny        Norwood/Rostrevor College
Riley Thilthorpe           West Adelaide/Adelaide High School

2018 Under 16 All-Australian team announced

WESTERN Australia and South Australia have dominated the 2018 AFL Under-16 All Australian side, with almost half of the representatives from those states. The two states accounted for both the Victorian teams at the recent National Under 16 Championships, and played out a thriller last month which saw South Australia win by just three points.

Western Australia has the most with six players, including defensive duo Brandon Walker and Denver Granger-Barras, while forwards Logan McDonald and Taj Schofield have made the team. Zane Trew will control the midfield, while Nathan O’Driscoll has been named on the five-man interchange. South Australia has the five members in the team, including midfielders, potential father-son prospect Luke Edwards, and Kevin Sheehan Medallist and South Australian Most Valuable Player (MVP) award winner Corey Durdin. Jye Sinderberry has been named at half-back, while Kaine Baldwin (centre half-forward) and Riley Thilthorpe (ruck) hold up key positions.

Vic Country has three players in the team with centre half-back Ethan Baxter, half-forward Elijah Hollands, and MVP winning midfielder Tanner Bruhn named in the final 23. Their Victorian Metro counterparts have just two players in the team – MVP winner Will Phillips, and Campbell Edwardes. Remarkably, Tasmania has recorded more members than Vic Metro in the final 22, as Sam Collins, Jackson Callow and Oliver Davis have been named in the side.

The final four spots belong to other Division Two states, with NSW/ACT pair Braedyn Campbell (half-back) and Errol Gulden (half-forward) representing the Rams. Queensland’s Alex Davies and Northern Territory’s Malcolm Rosas were named on the interchange.

Division One title-winning coach Julian Farkas from South Australia was named as head coach of the side, with Tasmania’s triumphant Division Two title-winning coach Nathan Warren named as assistant coach.