Tag: josh treacy

2020 AFL Draft recap: Fremantle Dockers

FREMANTLE reeled in an all-local haul in this year’s National Draft, including a couple of bargain Next Generation Academy (NGA) talents and youngsters with senior WAFL experience at the top end. After finishing 12th in 2020 under new coach Justin Longmuir, Fremantle looms as a fast-rising club with one of the best young midfields in the competition. That youthful exuberance should continue to shine with the latest intake, as a versatile crop enters the Dockers’ ranks looking to make an immediate impact. With a couple of starting roles arguably up for grabs, that could well be the case in 2021 as the West Australian side pushes for finals relevancy.

FREMANTLE

National Draft:
#14 Heath Chapman (West Perth/Western Australia)
#27 Nathan O’Driscoll (Perth/Western Australia)
#50 Brandon Walker (East Fremantle/Western Australia)
#54 Joel Western (Claremont/Western Australia)

Rookies:
Josh Treacy (Bendigo Pioneers), Bailey Banfield (Re-listed)

The first round of this year’s draft was littered with versatile tall options and Heath Chapman was one of them. The Dockers may have been tempted by some of the midfielders still available, but instead selected the 193cm West Perth product with Pick 14. While Fremantle lays claim to a bunch of tall defenders already, Chapman’s running capacity and marking ability have him pegged as one who could develop either as a wingman, or even a swingman.

With Nathan O’Driscoll on the board after round one, the Dockers opted to trade up and secure his services at the start of the second round. His value is something which divided clubs and analysts alike, but should prove a very handy selection. He joins his sister, Emma in purple and promises to provide a tireless work-rate to go with an excellent inside-outside balance in midfield. It may be a tough engine room to crack, but O’Driscoll is a versatile type who can fit in on each line.

Fremantle staff would have come away laughing as NGA graduates Brandon Walker and Joel Western were bid on with picks in the 50s. Both players are arguably top 30 talents and have some serious athleticism to go with their footballing nous. Walker is an attacking half-back who love to take the game on and makes good decisions by foot, with his overhead marking another handy trait.

Western was the Claremont Colts captain this year and overcame injury to cap of a stellar campaign, also claiming best afield honours in the first WA All-Stars game. His ground level work and acceleration from congestion are excellent, with clean skills and goal sense making him an option to feature on Fremantle’s half-forward line early.

Rounding out the Dockers’ overall haul, Josh Treacy proved their only fresh selection in the Rookie Draft as Bailey Banfield was re-listed. The Bendigo Pioneers product is another Vic Country selection and one who could play the role Jesse Hogan was recruited for, as a tall target up forward with good presence. Treacy is an aggressive type who loves to throw his weight around and is working on building his running game to potentially even move further afield.

Featured Image: NGA product Joel Western is finally a Docker | Credit: (Retrieved from) Fremantle FC

2020 AFL PSD & Rookie Draft: Pick by Pick

THE 2020 AFL Pre-Season and Rookie Drafts completed today, with just one pick in the Pre-Season Draft, and in the Rookie Draft

Pre-Season Draft:

#1 Adelaide – Jackson Hately (GWS GIANTS)

Rookie Draft:

#1 Adelaide – Bryce Gibbs (Adelaide)
#2 North Melbourne – Patrick Walker (North Hobart/Tasmania)
#3 Sydney – Malachy Carruthers (Sturt/South Australia)
#4 Hawthorn – Jack Saunders (Norwood/South Australia))
#5 Gold Coast – Jacob Townsend (Essendon)
#6 Essendon – Martin Gleeson (Essendon)
#7 Fremantle – Josh Treacy (Bendigo Pioneers/Vic Country)
#8 Carlton – Luke Parks (Glenelg/South Adelaide)
#9 GWS – Sam Reid (GWS)
#10 Melbourne – PASS
#11 Western Bulldogs – Lachlan McNeil (Woodville-West Torrens/South Adelaide)
#12 West Coast – Zane Trew (Swan Districts/Western Australia)
#13 Collingwood – Jack Ginnivan (Bendigo Pioneers/Vic Country)
#14 St Kilda – PASS
#15 Brisbane – Grant Birchall (Brisbane)
#16 Port Adelaide – Tyson Goldsack (Port Adelaide SANFL)
#17 Richmond – PASS
#18 North Melbourne – Connor Menadue (Werribee/VFL)
#19 Sydney – PASS
#20 Gold Coast – Jack Hombsch (Gold Coast)
#21 Essendon – Dylan Clarke (Essendon)
#22 Fremantle – Bailey Banfield (Fremantle)
#23 Carlton – PASS
#24 GWS – Zach Sproule (GWS)
#25 Melbourne – PASS
#26 Western Bulldogs – Roarke Smith (Western Bulldogs)
#27 West Coast – Daniel Venables (West Coast)
#28 Collingwood – Isaac Chugg (Launceston/Tasmania)
#29 St Kilda – PASS
#30 Port Adelaide – PASS
#31 Richmond – PASS
#32 North Melbourne – PASS
#33 Gold Coast – Jordan Murdoch (Gold Coast)
#34 Essendon – PASS
#35 Collingwood – PASS
#36 St Kilda – PASS
#37 Port Adelaide – Taj Schofield (Woodville-West Torrens/South Australia)
#38 Gold Coast – Aiden Fyfe (Broadbeach/Queensland)
#39 Collingwood – PASS
#40 Gold Coast – Rhys Nicholls (Labrador/Gold Coast)

High stakes training: Vic prospects take the field ahead of draft day

VICTORIAN AFL Draft prospects hit the track one last time before draft day, strutting their stuff at Highgate Reserve in a one-off training session on Wednesday. The meet served as a final chance for recruiters to survey the talent available in this year’s pool, just a week out from draft day on December 9.

Players who earned Draft Combine invites in September were split into two major groups, initially separating those from country and metropolitan regions, before being divided even further into small drill groups of five to seven participants. Among those on display were potential number one picks Jamarra Ugle-Hagan and Elijah Hollands, the latter of which participated in a running program amid his recovery from a preseason ACL tear.

Draft Central analyst Ed Pascoe was on hand in Craigieburn to recap all the action and give an insight into how things panned out.

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RECAP:

By: Ed Pascoe

A sense of irony came over me walking into Highgate Reserve, the same ground I last got to watch a lot of these young players back on March 15, right before Covid derailed the Victorian football season. It was a Northern Knights vs. Oakleigh Chargers trial game on that day and the ground was bustling with keen onlookers, many the same faces I would see today and it was great to see the development of some of these players. One of the big matchups in March was Nikolas Cox vs. Jamarra Ugle-Hagan which looked to be a clash we would see if the National Championships went ahead. Fast forward a few months and both players have bulked up, looking as sharp as ever in the lead up to the most important time of their lives.

To start the day it was the Vic Metro based players who were split into four training groups with the following participants:

Group A

Ewan Macpherson
Reef McInnes
Bailey Laurie
Archie Perkins
Will Phillips
Conor Stone

Group B

Cody Brand
Nikolas Cox
Josh Eyre
Liam Kolar
Ollie Lord

Group C

Jake Bowey
Josh Clarke
Connor Downie
Max Holmes
Finlay Macrae
Corey Preston

Group D

Matthew Allison
Lachlan Carrigan
Luke Cleary
Eddie Ford
Liam McMahon
Fraser Rosman

Injured Group

Max Heath
Campbell Edwardes

Vic Country players would later take the field and were split into three main groups:

Group A

Cameron Fleeton
Zach Reid
Josh Treacy
Jamarra Ugle-Hagan
Henry Walsh

Group B

Ryan Angwin
Will Bravo
Jack Ginnivan
Charlie Lazzaro
Zavier Maher
Blake Reid
Harry Sharp

Group C

Dominic Bedendo
Sam Berry
Tanner Bruhn
Clayton Gay
Oliver Henry
Seamus Mitchell
Nick Stevens

Injured Group (Laps)

Elijah Hollands
Charlie Ham
Noah Gribble

There were four main drills conducted after a warm-up; with ground balls, marking, kicking, and handballing the respective focus areas. The ground ball drill involved taking half volleys, running towards the loose ball coming from behind them, taking on the bump bag and finally working in pairs to pick the ball up cleanly under pressure from a teammate.

The marking drill was changed slightly as the day went on but the main focuses were receiving a high ball before getting called to a certain colour cone to run to, turn, and then meet at the drop zone of the ball. Contested marking was the final focus, with two players coming from either the back or front to contest a mark. This drill was certainly the most competitive and one of the drills players had the most fun in, with plenty wanting just ‘one more go’.

The kicking and handballing drills were fairly standard with a three-man weave, and a short to long stationary handball among the handball drills. The kicking drills consisted of kicking to a stationary target often 45 degrees to another player, and finally a drill which involved kicking to a leading player which really separated the better kickers on the day – especially in the notoriously windy conditions at Highgate Reserve.

Overall, it was a great day for the players to get a run while bonding with some former teammates and potentially future teammates. It was also a nice little refresher for scouts and recruiters as well, who got to see how some of these players have progressed both in their football and in their body. It is hard to gauge who would be considered the ‘standouts’ from this training session but most players put in the effort required and it was also good to see some really get involved with coaches and looking for advice in certain drills, showing their commitment to getting the best out of themselves.

Classic Contests: Dragons break Bendigo hearts despite inaccuracy

IF you are missing footy like we are, then let us somewhat salvage that with a look back in our series of Classic Contests. In today’s contest we look at another clash between the NAB League rivals to complete our full series, and today’s battle is between the Bendigo Pioneers and Sandringham Dragons. In this edition, we wind back the clock just over a year to when the two sides played out a heart-stopper in Echuca.

2019 NAB League, Round 8
Saturday May 18, 1:00pm
Victoria Park, Echuca

BENDIGO PIONEERS 4.0 | 6.0 | 10.1 | 12.2 (74)
SANDRINGHAM DRAGONS 3.3 | 4.10 | 6.12 | 10.18 (78)

GOALS:

Bendigo: J. Dick-O’Flaherty 3, J. Treacy 3, R. Clarke 2, J. Evans, K. Attwell, J. Schischka, Z. Murley.
Sandringham:
J. Florent 2, E. Soylemez 2, R. Bowman 2, R. Byrnes, T. Spencer, J. Bell, M. Bergman.

BEST:

Bendigo: W. Wallace, J. Treacy, J. Evans, J. Ginnivan, W. Shaw, R. Wilson
Sandringham:
C. Watts, M. Bergman, A. Hanrahan, R. Byrnes, J. Voss, J. Bell

Draftees in action:

Bendigo: Nil.
Sandringham:
Miles Bergman, Ryan Byrnes, Jack Bell

Road trips in the NAB League competition are often long and arduous, but a win can see those types of feelings dissipate in an instant. That was exactly the case for Sandringham as the Dragons travelled to Echuca to take on Bendigo in last year’s competition, looking to make up for a loss to Eastern in their previous outing. The visitors sat fourth at 4-2 after a 3-0 start, and Bendigo had endured a similar run having failed to build on its 2-0 start.

Both sides would be missing key personnel too, with Bendigo particularly impacted by the absence of Brodie Kemp and Thomson Dow, while Sandringham would have to battle without the likes of Finn Maginness, Jack Mahony and Fischer McAsey among others. It meant the Dragons would boast the only three eventual draftees to take the field; Miles Bergman, Ryan Byrnes, and Jack Bell.

The impact of the APS football season seemed to even the two sides up, while also providing a great opportunity to some bottom-age stars to shine. The greatest margin of the match would reach only a little over three goals either way, with Bendigo’s incredible accuracy, and Sandringham’s lack of keeping the contest tight. With 28 scoring shots (10.18) to Bendigo’s 14 (12.2), the Dragons only just snuck over the line by four points.

A Josh Treacy major at 59 seconds into the final term had Bendigo looking good for the win, until Sandringham slowly bridged the gap and was eventually put in front by Riley Bowman with 10 minutes left to play. James Schischka‘s goal with over three minutes remaining gave the hosts some hope of reclaiming the lead, but they would fall just short in the end.

Defenders earned best-afield honours for both sides, with Corey Watts (12 disposals, three marks) and Will Wallace (15 disposals, three marks, six rebound 50s) recognised for their efforts. Treacy’s three goals were important to Bendigo’s cause, as were Riley Wilson‘s team-high 23 disposals. Byrnes unsurprisingly led all comers with 31 touches and a goal, followed by Angus Hanrahan on 26, while Bergman booted 1.5 from his 19 disposals and five marks.

The Dragons would go on to finish fourth come the end of the regular season, and couldn’t quite improve on it during finals as they were bundled out handily by eventual premier, Oakleigh in the preliminary finals. Bendigo ended up in 11th with five wins and 10 losses, before being dumped out in Wildcard Round by Northern.

As should always be the case though, the true success of each region would have been defined by their respective hauls of draftees. Sandringham produced nine players good enough to land on an AFL list in 2019, while Bendigo ended up with four moving on into the elite system.

NAB League Boys 2019 Throwback: Round 11 – Gippsland the big winners on super Saturday

FIVE of the six fixtures scheduled for Round 11 of the 2019 NAB League were played out on a super Saturday, with Gippsland among the big winners. In an interesting quirk, the eventual top four sides all squared off against each other, with the Power facing Oakleigh, while Eastern and Sandringham went head-to-head in Sunday’s lone fixture. Mars Stadium in Ballarat hosted the lone double-header of the weekend, while Tasmania was again raided by a Victorian side and Calder enjoyed the bye.

That side was Northern, who came out narrow nine-point winners against the Devils at Kingston Twins Ovals. The Knights looked to be coasting to victory having led at every break, laying claim to a 19-point buffer at three-quarter time, and extending the margin out to 34 points less that 10 minutes into the final term. A late charge by the home side would fall short as Northern took its foot off the gas, but still travelled back to Victoria with the four points.

Tasmania’s Jordan Lane booted a game-high with three majors as his side’s only multiple goalkicker, while Carlton draftee Sam Philp shared top honours in the ball winning stakes alongside Josh D’Intinosante with 30 disposals apiece. Oliver Davis fared best for Tasmania in that department with 28 touches, while fellow bottom-agers Patrick Walker (25 disposals, one goal) and Jackson Callow (16 disposals, 1.2) also impressed.

Heading back to Victoria, and Western made its trip to Ballarat a fruitful one by trumping the Greater Western Victoria (GWV) Rebels by seven points. In a similar vein to Northern, the Jets led at every break in the low-scoring affair, but were made to work for their victory as GWV pulled to within a single point midway through the final term. The fightback would again prove too little, too late though, as Western held on to secure its seventh win.

Competition leading goalkicker Archi Manton was the only player to boot multiple majors (two), with individual goalkickers spread across the two sides. Liam Herbert (28 disposals) and Mitch Martin were among the Rebels to find a good amount of ball and the big sticks, with Carlton rookie Josh Honey (16 disposals) Western’s highest disposal winner to also bag a goal. Daly Andrews impressed with 27 touches, as did the pairing of Josh Kellett and Lucas Rocci in defence.

They say when it rains, it pours, and that proved the case for Dandenong after having its undefeated streak snapped in Round 10, following it up with another loss – this time to the Murray Bushrangers to the tune of 34 points. Murray’s inaccuracy was the only factor keeping the Stingrays in the game for the best part of three quarters, with its 25 scoring shots to 11 only yielding a 19-point lead at the main break. The Bushrangers finally managed to reverse the trend in the fourth term to run out comfortable winners.

Ryley Bouker and Dominic Bedendo were a couple of bottom-age Bushrangers to impress in front of goal, evenly sharing six of their side’s goals in the win. Another bottom-age pair, Max Gregory and Jai Neal also booted multiple goals, combining for four of Dandenong’s 10 majors. Murray’s hold on the game shone through in its ball winners, with Cam Wild (29 disposals) and Jye Chalcraft (27) well ahead of Dandenong’s best in Bayleigh Welsh, who managed 19 touches and a goal.

In the second game of Saturday’s Ballarat double-header, two country sides went at it for the second time in season 2019. Bendigo would again come up trumps over Geelong, setting up the 29-point win with a six-goal to one second term and holding on to secure victory despite being kept scoreless in the final quarter. The Falcons’ superior finish provided a slight positive despite the loss, as the young side had become known for late fade-outs.

Big-bodied bottom-ager Josh Treacy had a good day at the office with four goals, while the over-age Harry Stubbings also booted multiple goals (two) from his 19 disposals. Sharing the spoils as top ball winners were Geelong’s Keidan Rayner and Bendigo’s Ben Worme with 26 touches apiece, while 2020 Falcons co-captain Cam Fleeton continued his mid-season rise with 21 disposals from defence, and Swans draftee Brady Rowles found the ball 15 times.

Morwell was the next country venue to host NAB League action, as Gippsland took on Oakleigh in what would end up being a qualifying final preview. But the strong Power unit took home the points on this occasion against the undermanned Chargers, keeping them scoreless in the third term while booting five majors of their own to make up most of the eventual 46-point winning margin.

The day arguably belonged to rookie draftee Fraser Phillips, who booted 5.3 from 20 disposals in a huge outing, with Tom Fitzpatrick the sole other multiple goalkicker. St Kilda recruit Leo Connolly led all comers with 32 disposals and a goal, while bottom-ager Sam Berry and former skipper Brock Smith were among three players to notch 26 touches. Vincent Zagari (22 disposals) was Oakleigh’s leading ball winner, followed by bolting 19-year-old forward Cooper Sharman (20 disposals, one goal) on a down day for the eventual premiers.

Sunday’s sole fixture again proved to be a finals preview, as Eastern and Sandringham did battle in a top of the table clash at Box Hill City Oval. Both teams were slightly undermanned, especially the Dragons, and it somewhat showed as the low-scoring affair was played on the terms of the structured and disciplined Ranges side. They would prove a tough nut to crack, holding out for the 18-point victory and keeping Sandringham goalless in the final term.

Big forwards Ben Hickleton and Billy McCormack combined for five of Eastern’s eight goals, with no Dragon able to find the big sticks on multiple occasions. Darcy Chirgwin led the ball winning stakes though with 32 touches, while eventual draftee Ryan Byrnes managed 21 of his own. Jarrod Gilbee (26 disposals) was Eastern’s leading possession getter, followed closely by usual suspects Zak Pretty (24) and Lachlan Stapleton (22).

Squad predictions: 2020 Vic Country Under 18s

THE annual Under 18 National Championships may be the only chance we get to catch a glimpse of the class of 2020 before draft day, with a decision on the recommencement of competition pushed back to at least September. In the meantime, Draft Central takes a look at how each regional squad may line up should the carnival come around, but with a few stipulations in place. Last week we began with our Vic Metro squad predictions and today we take a look at Vic Country’s potential line-up.

GUIDELINES:

  • Top-agers (2002-born) have been prioritised due to the limited season and exposure
  • Of those, AFL Academy Hub members also gain priority for the starting squad
  • Bottom-agers (2003-born) in the hub, and top-agers outside it are named for depth
  • 19-year-old inclusions are limited, having already staked their claims in previous years

A lot may change between now and when the squad will be announced, and it should be noted that injured players will not be picked here. Of course, the sides may vary greatly as players look to shift and develop in different positions, but each member has been selected based on the roles they have previously played. Given only previous form, preseason testing and scratch matches are what we have to go off, bolters are also difficult to gauge at this point.

But without further ado, let’s get stuck into the second squad prediction, with Vic Country’s talent broken down line-by-line. An alternate squad with no limitations will also be provided below.

DEFENCE

FB – Clayton Gay (Dandenong), Zach Reid (Gippsland), Cam Fleeton (Geelong)
HB – Nick Stevens (GWV), Ethan Baxter (Murray), Isaac Wareham (GWV)

There is a good mix of styles and talent among this back six, with some height, power, dash, and clean ball use all to come from these potential representatives. Versatile 202cm tall Zach Reid seems a lock for full back, able to also double as ruck aid.

Leadership candidate Cam Fleeton and Dandenong standout Clayton Gay provide sound reading of the play and aerial presence on the last line, while Greater Western Victoria (GWV) pair Nick Stevens and Isaac Wareham are solid options off half-back. 19-year-old Wareham has already donned the Big V at under 18 level, but may earn another chance given injury curtailed his top-age season.

Ethan Baxter is the final member of the defence, a solidly-built Richmond Next Generation Academy (NGA) product who is a touch undersized (192cm) to play as a pure key defender, but makes up for it with strength. He could be utilised elsewhere, but we see him fulfilling a role down back.

MIDFIELD

C – Ryan Angwin (Gippsland), Tanner Bruhn (Geelong), Jack Ginnivan (Bendigo)
FOL – Henry Walsh (Geelong), Sam Berry (Gippsland), Zavier Maher (Murray)

Zavier Maher may be the tallest of the Vic Country mids here at 184cm, but by no means will the chosen crop lack power or ball winning ability. Maher, Sam Berry, and Tanner Bruhn are all terrific at the centre bounces, with Maher and Berry the powerful types, while Bruhn is all class in congestion.

Berry can run all day, too, much like Bendigo’s Jack Ginnivan on the outside. Ginnivan could also find a spot up forward like fellow wingman, Ryan Angwin, but the pair have really come on of late and should have no trouble in making an impact further afield.

Of course, Henry Walsh will likely be the one to provide first use to his midfield fleet as the primary ruck. The brother of Carlton Rising Star, Sam is quite apt at the centre bounces with his 201cm frame and is constantly working on his ground level work.

FORWARD

HF – Noah Gadsby (Geelong), Oliver Henry (Geelong), Seamus Mitchell (Bendigo)
FF – Dominic Bedendo (Murray), Jamarra Ugle-Hagan (Oakleigh), Charlie Lazzaro (Geelong)

This is hardly a forward six blessed with height or overwhelming strength, but that is not to say that it lacks marking power. Much like Baxter in defence, the high-flying Oliver Henry could play above his size as a focal point, though may be better suited to a third tall role. Highly touted Bulldogs NGA prospect Jamarra Ugle-Hagan is unbeatable off the lead at full forward, so is a lock for that spot.

Alongside him may be Dominic Bedendo, a fantastic athletic talent who can compete both in the air and at ground level, while Charlie Lazzaro occupies the other pocket. He is arguably predominantly more a midfielder, but has been adding strings to his bow as a small forward.

On the flanks, his Geelong teammate Noah Gadsby also slots in as a newcomer to the forward line, while raw Bendigo product Seamus Mitchell assumes a role familiar to him on the same line. The largely small make-up of this six is somewhat a product of the guidelines we put in place, as there are a few key position products across each age bracket who could easily add some height and strength to the structure.

INTERCHANGE

INT – Sam Conforti (Bendigo), Will Bravo (Dandenong), Bayleigh Welsh (Dandenong), Blake Kuipers (Dandenong)

Filling out the side are some versatile options, with most of these prospects able to be utilised in many roles. Sam Conforti skippered the Under 16 Country side, and could well slot in as a small forward or wingman in this lineup. Dandenong’s Will Bravo is an exciting player who should also get a run up forward, providing a touch of speed and evasion while also being able to contribute in midfield.

Two more Stingrays cap off the side, with Bayleigh Welsh a midfielder the Dandenong program is high on, while athletic over-age swingman Blake Kuipers could be one to again sneak into the team as key position or ruck depth.

TOP-AGE DEPTH

Given this may be the only chance for draft-eligible top-agers to shine in front of recruiters in 2020, there will be plenty who come onto the radar of AFL clubs. Elijah Hollands and Noah Gribble are two who would have featured in the team, but unfortunately miss out due to long-term knee injuries.

Academy prospect Josh Treacy is a key forward who could well fit into the squad having gained experience for Country at Under 17 level, with fellow tall options Mason Hawkins and Keith Robinson of Gippsland others who can fill that forward/ruck role.

In terms of smalls, classy Geelong co-captain Gennaro Bove may be in the mix, while nippy GWV forward Harry Sharp has also caught the eye alongside another Falcon, Blake Reid. Other options from the Geelong region include Charlie Brauer – another outstanding athlete – and Kyle Skene.

Speaking of athletes, Bendigo is high on elite runner Jack Hickman and could also see the likes of ex-Rebel Jack Tillig or Finn Ellis-Castle push into contention. Dandenong has a couple of products around the mark too, with Deakyn Smith and Jai Neal both likely to be considered.

THE BOTTOM-AGERS

Last year’s Under 16 side may not have produced pure results-based success, but there are a few fantastic prospects who should push into contention. Leading the pack is last year’s carnival MVP Josh Rachele, a damaging midfielder/forward who is incredibly skilled.

Ben Hobbs was his partner-in-crime through midfield and should also get a crack as one of many high-end GWV up-and-comers. Those include Charlie Molan, Josh Rentsch, and Josh Gibcus, with the former two already boasting NAB League experience.

Fleet-footed Sandringham prospect Campbell Chesser was another to impress enough to break into the NAB League, while fellow Under 16 All Australians Toby Conway and Cooper Hamilton are also within the Academy bubble.

Given the focus will even more strictly be placed on draft eligible players, the likes of Ben Green, Connor Macdonald, Tom Brown, Justin Davies and so on will likely have to wait until next year to break into the Under-18 representative side.

There are a number of others outside of the current representative and academy bubbles who could also break through in their own top-age seasons, but it simply remains to be seen.

19-YEAR-OLDS

Possibly the most unlucky over-ager to miss out on our squads is Geelong’s Darcy Chirgwin, who was set to return to his original region after representing Sandringham in his draft year. After injury heavily interrupted his 2019 campaign, he should come into consideration once again.

Geelong teammate Jay Dahlhaus also suffered a long-term injury last year but should be back for more, while Murray prospect Sam Durham has shown a good rate of improvement as a latecomer to the code. Jai Newcombe is somewhat of a bolter having only now made the final cut at Gippsland, and could provide that inside presence with Chirgwin given he is yet to capture centre stage.

The two 19-year-olds we chose for both squads, Kuipers and Wareham, come into the category of players with great upside. Kuipers’ height and athleticism make him a handy option to fill gaps up either end or in the ruck, and his phenomenal testing performance puts him in good stead. Wareham is a solid athlete who will more so be looking for consistency after his top-age campaign last year.

With these additional top, bottom, and over-age prospects in mind, below is our potential best Vic Country squad without any provisions.

FB – Clayton Gay, Zach Reid, Cameron Fleeton
HB – Nick Stevens, Blake Kuipers, Ethan Baxter
C – Ryan Angwin, Tanner Bruhn, Jack Ginnivan
HF – Noah Gadsby, Oliver Henry, Seamus Mitchell
FF – Charlie Lazzaro, Jamarra Ugle-Hagan, Josh Rachele
FOL – Henry Walsh, Sam Berry, Zavier Maher
INT
– Will Bravo, Dominic Bedendo, Ben Hobbs, Isaac Wareham

2020 AFL Draft Positional Analysis: Key Forwards

FOLLOWING a draft class somewhat short on pure key position forward options comes a cohort which has already shown promise in that exact area. Though they may not currently have the opportunity to show their worth on the field, exposed form and long preseasons for most allow for a window into how the current stocks stack up.

In ramping up our 2020 AFL Draft analysis, Draft Central begins its line-by-line positional breakdowns, starting with the big men. The following list features pocket profiles of top-age (2002-born) prospects who are part of their respective AFL Academy hubs, while also touching on some names who missed out last year, or may feature on another list.

Without further ado, get to know some of the premier key forwards who are eligible to be drafted in 2020.

Note: The list is ordered alphabetically, not by any form of ranking.

Kaine Baldwin (Glenelg/South Australia)
193cm | 91kg

A rare case in that he may well find his way into draft contention despite not playing any football for two seasons. Baldwin had cracked the SANFL Reserves level for Glenelg after an outstanding Under 16 national carnival, but unfortunately went down with an untimely ACL injury in 2019. A year of recovery has him ready to go though, and a 20.8 yo-yo test score in preseason suggests he is building back the running ability that sets him apart. Baldwin’s contested marking is also eye-catching, utilising his strong frame to split packs. He comes in lightly below true key position height, so is also working on moving further afield.

>> DRAFT WATCH: Kaine Baldwin


Jackson Callow (Tasmania/Allies)

193cm | 95kg

A traditional, hulking key forward who thrives on the physical aspect of the game. Callow was a standout for Tasmania at Under 16 level, and more recently in the NAB League having booted 24 goals from 14 games for the Devils in 2019. At 95kg, he is well built and hardly beaten one-on-one, but also has the clean hands and speed to mark strongly at full tilt. Callow has garnered heavy opposition attention thus far as Tasmania’s spearhead, but does not hold back on the aggression to shake it off. He can work on sometimes reigning that aspect of his game in, while also sharpening his consistency in front of goal.

>> MARQUEE MATCHUP: Callow vs. Fleeton


Josh Eyre (Calder Cannons/Vic Metro)

197cm | 85kg

Eyre is an Essendon Next Generation Academy (NGA) member who is still quite raw, but has some terrific attributes. Having endured his share of injuries across the last two seasons, Eyre has grown to a more traditional key position height and is filling out nicely. Those extra centimetres and an added five kilograms since the start of last year point towards Eyre featuring as a centre half-forward in 2020, though he is able to play up either end or even on a wing. An exciting one for Bombers fans, who have some worthy academy talents coming through the ranks.

>> Q&A: Josh Eyre


Ollie Lord (Sandringham Dragons/Vic Metro)

195cm | 83kg

The Sandringham product came on strongly last season, featuring across five games for Sandringham in between his Geelong Grammar commitments, while also running out for Vic Metro’s Under 17 side. Lord is an athletic tall who sits at the precipice of true key position size, with his leap and high marking the most prominent features of his game. Still very much a developing type, the 18-year-old did well to crack into Sandringham’s side last year given its plethora of tall options. Trained at Melbourne during the off-season, and should make up part of Vic Metro’s spine in 2020.

>> Q&A: Ollie Lord


Logan McDonald (Perth/Western Australia)

195cm | 85kg

Another standout from the 2018 Under 16 carnival, McDonald has since shown plenty of the same potential having represented the Black Ducks at Under 18 level in 2019 as a bottom-ager. The Perth product has grown to key position size over the past year, and is one of the leading candidates in his role on the back of his ability to cover the ground well, clunk strong marks on the lead, and most importantly, find the goals. Has great endurance for a player of his size, notching a score of 21.3 on the preseason yo-yo test.

>> DRAFT WATCH: Logan McDonald


Liam McMahon (Northern Knights/Vic Metro)

193cm | 80kg

A developing forward who shot into calculations for representative honours, McMahon is perhaps a prospect who finds himself measuring up at an in-between size. While he certainly plays like a key forward with his terrific leap and sticky hands on the lead, McMahon does not have the height or weight of some of the other forwards on this list – perhaps suiting more of a third tall option at the elite level. Still, he averaged almost a goal per game over 15 NAB League outings in 2019 and should be another to feature in Vic Metro’s starting side.

>> FEATURE: Liam McMahon


Riley Thilthorpe (West Adelaide/South Australia)

200cm | 98kg

One of the most exciting draft prospects and a candidate to be taken first off the board is West Adelaide’s Thilthorpe, who mixes his time between the ruck and centre half-forward. The South Australian already has experience at SANFL League level and at 200cm and 98kg, is a readymade key position player. Thilthorpe’s running capacity is elite for a player of his size, with his aerial presence and impact around the ground also desirable assets. He could develop into a modern day ruck who plays like a fourth midfielder, or become a swingman given his high ceiling.

>> GET TO KNOW: West Adelaide U18s


Josh Treacy (Bendigo Pioneers/Vic Country)

193cm | 95kg

Another more traditional key forward is Treacy, one of Bendigo’s leading prospects. The well built centre half-forward is not afraid to throw his weight around and is aggressive both in his leading and ground-level presence. While that aggression can sometimes land him in trouble, the 193cm Pioneer has shown there is more to his game. Speaking of, Treacy was spotted at a few centre bounces last year, so may even be poised for a move up the ground given he lacks the height of others in this category.

>> FEATURE: Josh Treacy


Jamarra Ugle-Hagan (Oakleigh Chargers/Vic Country)

194cm | 83kg

Arguably the most talked about draft prospect to this point has been Ugle-Hagan, a candidate to join the exclusive number one pick list, and a Western Bulldogs NGA product. The Warrnambool native formerly represented the Greater Western Victoria region, but has since relocated to Oakleigh’s zone given he boards at Scotch College. Ugle-Hagan is remarkably athletic, testing well across all areas during pre-season and proving just why he is near-unbeatable at full flight. His breakaway speed on the lead and high marking are outstanding, though Ugle-Hagan will be working on his field kicking and consistency in front of goal. Has also played in defence at times, but looks most comfortable up forward.

>> DRAFT WATCH: Jamarra Ugle-Hagan


OTHERS TO CONSIDER

Among the others to consider are a good number of prospects who missed out on being drafted last year as top-agers, and 2020-eligible players who may well find their way onto other lists – position-wise.

Sandringham over-ager Felix Flockart is a mobile 200cm bolter who can play forward or through the ruck, and will be one to watch when/if football returns having impressed during pre-season.

Another in that category is Northern’s Liam Kolar, who has transferred some elite traits from an athletics and soccer background. The 194cm Knight has a high-level mix of speed and endurance, and looks promising with his lead-up work from the forward 50.

The likes of West Australian Shannon Neale, South Australia’s Zac Phillips, Ned Carey, and Henry Smith, and Victorian Jack Diedrich also came into consideration, but should feature on the list of rucks to later be analysed.

Dynamic NT Thunder Academy jet Joel Jeffrey can fulfil the high marking forward role, but is a touch undersized to be considered key position at this stage, while James Borlase and Sam Tucker are tall utilities who may feature more as defenders.

In terms of other 19-year-olds, Kobe Tozer is a likely type whose development has been restricted by injury, while 2019 Allies representative Liam Delahunty may look to stake his claim having crossed to Victoria from the GWS GIANTS Academy.

NAB Leaguers Jamieson Rossiter and Kyle Yorke are others who may get a second look as over-agers, while Charlie Dean is another who was poised to return in between VFL duties – though he may be utilised up the other end.

Q&A: Sam Conforti (Bendigo Pioneers/Vic Country)

AS the postponement of all seasons commenced over the last few weeks, we head back to the pre-season a month earlier where we sat down with a number of athletes across the country. In a special Question and Answer (Q&A) feature, Draft Central‘s Michael Alvaro chatted with Bendigo Pioneers’ Sam Conforti at the NAB League Fitness Testing Day hosted by Rookie Me.

The diminutive midfielder-forward has been a feature for representative sides throughout his junior career to date, running out in Vic Country’s trial games last year after skippering the Under 16 side in 2018. Now a leader among the Pioneers group, the 173cm prospect will be looking to crack a National Championships berth after putting together a 16-game season for Bendigo in the NAB League across 2019. Much of Conforti’s experience has come through midfield or out on the wing, but he is now poised to lock down a role up forward where his agility and pressure around the ball will be invaluable.

Q&A

MA: Sam, you’ve just come off the yo-yo test – how’d you go?

SC: “Not too bad, I think I ran a PB (personal best) so I’m pretty happy. “Collectively, the boys ran pretty well so I think we’re all pretty happy.”

Is the running, particularly on the outside something you’re looking to bring into your top-age year?

“Definitely, trying to lead by example and trying to work both ways. “Obviously it’s good to run forward but, but we try and run back to help the backs out as much as we can as well.”

What sort of role are you looking to nail down this season, maybe a forward role?

“Yeah, this year I’ve moved forward. I’m trying to play a bit of a high half-forward role, trying to get up the ground to try and create in our forward half. “So I’ll probably just try and nail a forward role.”

Being through the Vic Country system for so long, how’s that aided your development?

“It’s helped heaps. I got to learn off the likes of Caleb Serong, Brodie Kemp, and Hayden Young last year and then even the boys around me at the moment – Elijah Hollands, Tanner Bruhn just to name a (couple). “Being around that sort of environment helps my leadership going back to Bendigo as well and trying to drive a good standard. So yeah, it’s been really good.”

Who are some of the Bendigo boys you’re looking forward to running out with?

“I think we had about five in the Vic Country Hub this year so we’re good across the top-agers. “Josh Treacy, Jack Ginnivan, and Seamus Mitchell are all good ones to learn off as well. “They really drive the standards back at Bendigo and even Jack Evans and the likes of that are also pretty handy too.”

In terms of your goals, how will you rate the success of your season by the end of it?

“Well hopefully team success, it’s probably the biggest one for me. “So hopefully winning the NAB League would be nice but as far as on-field goes, just trying to play consistently, to stay in the side and play my role for the side.”

Classic Contests: Menzie’s fourth after the siren seals Devils win

IF you are missing footy like we are, then let us somewhat salvage that with a look back in a new series of Classic Contests. In today’s contest we look at one of the would-have-been Round 4 clashes in the NAB League this year between Tasmania Devils and Bendigo Pioneers. In this edition, we wind back the clock to 2019 when the teams played out their first contest and saw the Devils hold on for a thrilling-two point victory.

BENDIGO PIONEERS 0.1 | 3.4 | 6.6 | 11.8 (74)
TASMANIA DEVILS 3.5 | 4.5 | 7.9 | 11.10 (76)

Round 7 | Saturday, May 12, 2019
Queen Elizabeth Oval, 11am

With six rounds down, both Tasmania Devils and Bendigo Pioneers were evenly poised on the ladder. They both had two wins from five games, though the Pioneers were desperate to overturn a three-gam losing streak and held the narrowest percentage lead over the Devils from 11th to 12th with just 1.38 per cent separating the two sides on the NAB League Boys ladder. Tasmania had also suffered back-to-back losses after stringing together a couple of wins against Northern Territory and Calder Cannons. The week prior, the Devils had push Oakleigh Chargers all the way, going down by one point, while the Pioneers had lost to the Cannons by 16.

It was a scrappy start to be fair with the Devils leading 0.5 to 0.1 with 21 minutes down and four to play in the opening term. What happened in the final four minutes was hard to believe, but the Devils just exploded with goals to Rhyan Mansell, Bailey Gordon and then Cohen Stephenson after the siren to blow the margin from four points to 22 points in that short time frame. It took four minutes into the second quarter, but Jack Hickman and then Pioneers captain James Schischka kicked truly to cut the deficit back to eight points, before Jye Menzie kicked his first of the day, which was countered by Jack Ginnivan a short time later. The Devils maintained a lead, but just seven points at the main break, while the Pioneers had the momentum heading into the second half.

Just two minutes into the third quarter and Ginnivan had his second goal to level the scores, but a crucial steadier from Ethan Jackson gave the Devils a bit of breathing space. Menzie’s second and then a goal to Lachlan Gadomski extended the visiting side’s lead out to as much as 21 points at one stage. A pair of majors late in the term to Sam Conforti and Riley Clarke reeled in the deficit to nine points at the last change, setting up a highly anticipated final term. It lived up to expectations with Menzie’s third snag giving his team a 15-point buffer nine minutes into the term. A five-minute purple patch for the Pioneers midway through the quarter saw them storm into the lead courtesy of goals to Jake Dick-O’Flaherty, Conforti and Schischka, with the latter putting his team in front. Just when it looked as if they had given up a strong lead, Oliver Davis saluted with a steadier for a two-point narrow advantage. But again Bendigo came, booting a fourth and fifth goal in the quarter with Braydon Vaz and Dick-O’Flaherty converting majors.

The margin was 10 points in favour of the home side at the 22 minute and 39 second mark. Just two minutes and 21 seconds remained in the contest and it would take an amazing effort for the Devils to win from there. Isaac Chugg‘s goal with 59 seconds left of the clock had the Devils not out of the contest, and the Pioneers wary that the next 60 seconds would be the most crucial of the match. It took the umpires until the 24.42 mark of the term to throw the ball up, which meant Tasmania had 18 seconds to get the ball from the middle to the forward 50. With the density rule in play, Bendigo was not able to flood back numbers which gave the Devils an even chance. The Devils won the initial tap but it was sharked and Aaron Gundry thumped it to half-forward where Tasmania’s Liam Viney received the handball from a tackled Gadomski and just bombed it on the boot with seven seconds remaining. A crucial handball from Will Harper to a teammate to quickly put it on the boot which was marked by Menzie on a clever lead. The siren sounded a few seconds later and he calmly slotted the after-the-siren winner to hand his team the unbelievable win.

Menzie was the star of the show with four majors from 12 disposals and three marks, while Ben Simpson won the most disposals for his side with 22, as well as eight marks, two clearances and two rebounds. Jackson (21 disposals – 12 contested – six clearances, three inside 50s and a goal) and Oliver Burrows-Cheng (19 disposals – nine contested – six marks, seven tackles, four clearances and six inside 50s) were strong in midfield. Sam Collins was a reliable source in defence with 19 disposals, three marks and five rebounds, teaming up well with Patrick Walker who had 13 touches, two marks and five rebounds. Davis laid a game-high 13 tackles to go with his 15 touches, four clearances, four inside 50s and a goal, while Mansell helped himself to 14 disposals, five marks, six inside 50s and a major.

For the Pioneers, Conforti was sensational with 30 disposals, eight marks, two clearances, four inside 50s, six rebounds and two goals, while partner-in-crime Ginnivan also kicked a couple of majors from 27 disposals, four marks, four clearances and three inside 50s. Dick-O’Flaherty (20 disposals, three marks, four tackles, four clearances, three inside 50s, three rebounds and two goals) and Schischka (18 disposals, six marks, four tackles, two inside 50s, three rebounds and two goals) played strong all-round games. Logan Fitzgerald (21 disposals, six marks) and Ben Worme (18 disposals, eight marks) found plenty of the ball, while Josh Treacy (17 touches, eight marks, 19 hitouts and six inside 50s) and William Wallace (16 disposals, seven marks and five rebounds) had an influence through the ruck and defence respectively.

Q&A: Jack Ginnivan (Bendigo Pioneers/Vic Country)

AS the postponement of all seasons commenced over the last few weeks, we head back to the pre-season a few weeks earlier where we sat down with a number of athletes across the country. In a special Question and Answer (Q&A) feature, Draft Central‘s Michael Alvaro chatted with Bendigo Pioneers’ Jack Ginnivan at the NAB League Fitness Testing Day hosted by Rookie Me.

Having cracked a century of goals in a single junior season at just 11 years of age, the zippy goalsneak has matured into a hard-running half-forward with eyes on some midfield time in his top-age campaign. The 182cm jet bagged 19 goals across his 12 NAB League games in 2020, averaging a tick over 16 disposals and three marks to boot as one of Bendigo’s most promising draft prospects.


MA: How’s testing day been?

JG: “It’s been pretty fun. I’m injured at the moment so that’s been a bit disappointing but it’s good to see all the boys going well.”

What kind of a knock have you picked up?

“Hamstring. “So only two to three weeks which is good, but yeah a bit disappointing. “But good to be here.”

But a pretty solid pre-season other than that?

“Yeah it’s been really good. “The Pioneers are in a pretty good spot, everyone’s up and about there, a couple of injuries but it’s been good, real good.”

You found some form in the back-end of last season, how’d you rate your bottom-age year?

“It was a fun year, it was challenging but it was really good. “Yeah, I hit some form late and hopefully (can) continue this year.”

You played forward a lot last year, will you get more of a run in the midfield now?

“Yeah hopefully I can go into the midfield a bit this year. “About 50-50 forward and midfield which will be really good, change it up and yeah, it’ll be exciting.”

What are you improving on to transition into that midfield role?

“I’m working on contested ball especially, and tackling – there’s a really big emphasis on that which is the key to be a midfielder.”

On the flip-side, what are the strengths that’ve shown you’re capable of the role?

“Probably my kicking at the moment, it’s probably my best asset. “And my two-way running has gotten heaps better than last year.”

What’s it been like knocking around the Vic Country Hub?

“It’s really good. “To be with the best 28 in the Vic Country region is really good. “So yeah, it’s good fun.”

Does it help having a couple of Bendigo teammates in there as well?

“Yeah Sammy Conforti, Treac’ (Josh Treacy) which is really good, makes you feel at home.”

What kind of goals are you setting for the year, if any?

“Obviously the big goal is to get drafted but probably to win a couple more games than we did last year for the Pioneers – a bit of team success would be excellent.”


FROM THE TALENT MANAGER:

“Jack Ginnivan’s come back from the experience at camps one and two far more changed, far more responsible and mature in his approach to his footy. “That’s not to say he was irresponsible, and he’s still a character – we like that… he’s mainly played as a forward but he’ll probably play a bit of half-back and a bit in the mid. “He’s very good around goals, he’s got a bit of the Joel Selwood’s – seems to get a fair few head-high tackles and free kicks so I reckon he might play a different role this year.” – Steve Sharp