Tag: final siren podcast

EXPLAINER | Pocket Podcast: Club AFL Draft previews (Part 4)

OVER the past few weeks, Draft Central launched its brand new series of pocket podcasts, a collection of short-form discussions which narrow in on a range of topics heading into the 2020 AFL Draft. In the next edition, special guest Tom Cheesman again joined Chief Editor Peter Williams and AFL Draft Editor Michael Alvaro as they continue to break down how this year’s draft may pan out for each club.

The clubs featured in part four are Adelaide, Essendon, and Greater Western Sydney (GWS), all of whom loom as the three biggest players in this year’s first round. The Crows lay claim to pick one and have narrowed their options down to four; bid on Jamarra Ugle-Hagan, or take one of Logan McDonald, Riley Thilthorpe, and Elijah Hollands. With Pick 9 and the first two second round selections also under their belt, this years wooden spooners comfortably hold the highest total draft points value of any side. There also looms the factor of their academy products in Tariek Newchurch and James Borlase, who they will hope can get to the club as rookies.

Then there is Essendon, who could become the first team to boast three top 10 picks since the expansion era, depending on how the pointy end plays out. The Bombers’ early hand will likely attract some live trade interest, but a great opportunity to bring in multiple elite talents presents itself. Essendon could also place bids on a couple of academy talents, with Port Adelaide NGA hopeful Lachlan Jones in that range and Collingwood NGA member Reef McInnes tempting the Bombers, who are crying out for a big-bodied inside midfielder. Like Adelaide, Essendon also has a couple of academy members of interest in Cody Brand and Josh Eyre.

GWS is the other club with a massively influential hand, largely thanks to the Jeremy Cameron trade. The Giants now lay claim to four first round picks and five within the top 30, providing a terrific opportunity to hit live trading hard or simply work with the strong haul they already have. There are a good number of options available in the teens for GWS, of which could bolster their midfield and key defensive needs in the long term. It is also a good range for sliders to come into play and the Giants may well end up as the team which shapes the late-first round to early-second round action.

Below are the picks held by each club, as of December 3.

Adelaide: 1, 9, 22, 23, 40, 80 
Essendon:
6, 7, 8, 44, 77, 85, 87
GWS: 
10, 13, 15, 20, 26, 74, 88

To listen to the discussion in full, click here.

>> DOWNLOAD 2020 AFL Draft Guide
>> AFL Draft Whispers: 2020
>> Power Rankings: November Update

EXPLAINER | Pocket Podcast: Club AFL Draft previews (Part 3)

OVER the past few weeks, Draft Central launched its brand new series of pocket podcasts, a collection of short-form discussions which narrow in on a range of topics heading into the 2020 AFL Draft. In the next edition, special guest Tom Cheesman joined Chief Editor Peter Williams and AFL Draft Editor Michael Alvaro to breakdown how this year’s draft may pan out for each club.

The clubs featured in part three are Collingwood, Hawthorn, North Melbourne and Sydney, all of whom have key decisions to make at the pointy end. The Magpies, Hawks, and Swans all have high-level academy products who look set to yield bids in tricky spots, putting their recruiting staff under the pump.

A bid for Collingwood’s Reef McInnes could come as early as with Essendon’s top 10 picks but the Pies will be sweating on him falling past their first selection (currently 14). Hawthorn is in a similar boat with Connor Downie, who will tempt clubs around the Hawks’ second pick (currently 24), especially given it is set to slide down the order on the back of other academy bids. Then there is Sydney, who is preparing to match a bid for Braeden Campbell within the top 10 and will be sweating on Errol Gulden‘s value in round two. North also looms as a key player given its rights to picks two and 11, which will undoubtedly yield a pair of elite talents. Either way, these will be some of the busier list management and recruiting teams come draft time and they each have some tough calls to make.

Below are the picks held by each club, as of December 1.

Collingwood: 14, 16, 65, 70, 75, 92
Hawthorn: 4, 24, 45, 46, 49, 72
North Melbourne: 2, 11, 30, 39, 71, 81
Sydney: 3, 34, 37, 43, 48, 60, 82

To listen to the discussion in full, click here.

>> AFL Draft Whispers: 2020
>> Power Rankings: November Update

Past Episodes:

Club-by-club previews…
Club AFL Draft previews (Part 1)
Club AFL Draft previews (Part 2)

The best…
AFL Draft hands
Best academy and father-son hauls
Non-aligned midfielders
Readymade prospects
Players under 175cm
Midfielders over 190cm

Player comparisons…
Logan McDonald vs. Jamarra Ugle-Hagan
Denver Grainger-Barras vs. Heath Chapman
Brayden Cook vs. Conor Stone
Key defenders kicking comparison

Further analysis…
Potential cult heroes
An early top 10 look
Offence from defence

EXPLAINER | Pocket Podcast: Club AFL Draft previews (Part 2)

OVER the past few weeks, Draft Central launched its brand new series of pocket podcasts, a collection of short-form discussions which narrow in on a range of topics heading into the 2020 AFL Draft. In the next edition, special guest Tom Cheesman joined Chief Editor Peter Williams and AFL Draft Editor Michael Alvaro to breakdown how the this year’s draft may pan out for each club.

The clubs featured in part two are Brisbane, Fremantle, Melbourne, Port Adelaide, and St Kilda, teams which do not have overly stacked hands at the pointy end, but have some handy selections and big decisions to make. The Lions, Dockers, and Power all face dilemmas in regards to matching bids on their Next Generation Academy (NGA) talents, while the Demons and Saints will look to stock up and remain in the finals hunt.

Below are the picks held by each club, as of November 29.

Brisbane: 25, 53, 58, 66, 68, 69, 94
Fremantle: 12, 32, 55, 56, 63
Melbourne: 18, 19, 28, 50, 89
Port Adelaide: 35, 47, 57, 59, 73, 95
St Kilda: 21, 64, 67, 74, 93

To listen to the discussion in full, click here.

>> AFL Draft Whispers: 2020
>> Power Rankings: November Update

Past Episodes:

Club-by-club previews…
Club AFL Draft previews (Part 1)

The best…
AFL Draft hands
Best academy and father-son hauls
Non-aligned midfielders
Readymade prospects
Players under 175cm
Midfielders over 190cm

Player comparisons…
Logan McDonald vs. Jamarra Ugle-Hagan
Denver Grainger-Barras vs. Heath Chapman
Brayden Cook vs. Conor Stone
Key defenders kicking comparison

Further analysis…
Potential cult heroes
An early top 10 look
Offence from defence

EXPLAINER | Pocket Podcast: Club AFL Draft previews (Part 1)

OVER the past few weeks, Draft Central launched its brand new series of pocket podcasts, a collection of short-form discussions which narrow in on a range of topics heading into the 2020 AFL Draft. In the next edition, Special guest Tom Cheesman joined Chief Editor Peter Williams and AFL Draft Editor Michael Alvaro to breakdown how the this year’s draft may pan out for each club.

The clubs featured in part one are Carlton, Gold Coast, Geelong, Richmond, West Coast and Western Bulldogs – all teams which may not feature too heavily among action at the pointy end as it stands. The Tigers, Eagles, and Cats would consider themselves well within the premiership window and thus may not have any pressing list needs to cover at the draft, making them muted players this year. Geelong and West Coast will hope to find a gem with their respective picks 51 and 62.

The Bulldogs’ picks may be wiped off the board if Academy gun Jamarra Ugle-Hagan yields a bid with pick one, leaving little for their recruiters to work with down the line. Meanwhile, Carlton has only just gained another pick in the second round and may only make two selections overall. Gold Coast is again set to be called up in the top five, but it could prove the Suns’ only pick given Academy members Alex Davies and Joel Jeffrey will be automatically placed on their senior list.

Nonetheless, there could be some interesting plays to unfold and some exciting prospects taken with later picks by these clubs, much of which formed the basis of their previews. To listen to the discussion in full, click here.

>> AFL Draft Whispers: 2020
>> Power Rankings: November Update

Past Episodes:

Potential cult heroes
An early top 10 look
The best AFL Draft hands
Best readymade prospects
Best players under 175cm
Best midfielders over 190cm
Logan McDonald vs. Jamarra Ugle-Hagan
Best academy and father-son hauls
Brayden Cook vs. Conor Stone
Key defenders kicking comparison
Offence from defence
Denver Grainger-Barras vs. Heath Chapman
The top non-aligned midfielders

EXPLAINER | Pocket Podcast: Potential AFL Draft cult heroes

OVER the past few weeks, Draft Central launched its brand new series of pocket podcasts, a collection of short-form discussions which narrow in on a range of topics heading into the 2020 AFL Draft. In the next edition, Chief Editor Peter Williams again sat down with AFL Draft Editor Michael Alvaro, this time to discuss some of the potential cult heroes available among this year’s crop.

These are the players who fans will likely warm to in quick time for a variety of reasons; whether it be their style of play, character, work-rate, or overall look. 10 names were thrown out as ones to watch for supporters with each club’s newest intake arriving shortly, as our editors put forward five of their favourite prospects each who just have something about them. If any of them land on your clubs’ list, be sure to remember the name.

To listen to the discussion in full, click here.

There lies a good variety of styles among the 10 players in question; ranging from small forwards, to midfielders, and key position brutes. Maurice Rioli Jnr and Brandon Walker, who are tied to Richmond and Fremantle respectively will already have their fans given that factor, but can win over plenty more with their exciting styles of play. Rioli is a punishing tackler with innate goal sense, while Walker’s athleticism and attacking brand from half-back are easy on the eye.

Speaking of, Caleb Poulter will be hard to miss with his bright boots and flowing mullet, much like fellow Woodville-West Torrens product Lachlan Jones. The latter also has ties to an AFL club (Port Adelaide) and will likely yield a bid within the top 15. Eddie Ford is another with one of those hairdos all the kids seem to be sporting these days, and could well become the next ‘Eddie’ to wow crowds with his knack for taking a hanger.

You may ask ‘what’s in a name?’ and we say plenty if Phoenix Spicer has anything to do with it. Bailey Laurie‘s nickname ‘Bill’ should also play into his popularity, though he is said to have no trouble in that department among his teammates. Nathan O’Driscoll and Jack Ginnivan are other great characters who could both end up in the top 30. The former is a hard runner whose defensive efforts should also appeal to fans. Rounding out the list is Jackson Callow, a big-bodied key forward who can clunk huge contested marks and promises to provide great presence out on the field.

Featured Image: Perth’s Nathan O’Driscoll celebrates some silverware | Credit: (Retrieved from) @WAFLOfficial via Twitter

EXPLAINER | Pocket Podcast: An early top 10 look

OVER the past few weeks, Draft Central launched its brand new series of pocket podcasts, a collection of short-form discussions which narrow in on a range of topics heading into the 2020 AFL Draft. In the next edition, Chief Editor Peter Williams again sat down with AFL Draft Editor Michael Alvaro, this time to take an early look at how the top 10 may pan out at this year’s AFL Draft.

As is the nature of the rumour mill around this time of year, the likely direction of the pointy end has already changed since recording, with clubs within the top five showing greater interest in specific players and shaping the later picks. There is also the factor of potential live trading, which could see the likes of Essendon and Collingwood push to enter the top five and shake up the order even further. Nonetheless, we had a crack at drafting the top 10 as we saw fit, following the draft order as of November 18.

To listen to the discussion in full, click here.

Below is the top 10 selected in the podcast, and an adjusted version made after our 2020 AFL Draft whispers piece.

Podcast Top 10:

1. Jamarra Ugle-Hagan – Western Bulldogs (Adelaide bid matched)
2. Logan McDonald – Adelaide
3. Elijah Hollands – North Melbourne
4. Denver Grainger-Barras – Sydney
5. Riley Thilthorpe – Hawthorn
6. Will Phillips – Gold Coast Suns
7. Braeden Campbell – Sydney (Essendon bid matched)
8. Lachlan Jones – Port Adelaide (Essendon bid matched)
9. Zach Reid – Essendon
10. Archie Perkins – Essendon

Updates:

Among the changes we would already make, Adelaide may well opt to maintain the number one pick status and take a player they actually have access to – ie. not Jamarra Ugle-Hagan. That makes Logan McDonald the number one, and North Melbourne or Sydney the team to place a bid on Ugle-Hagan. The Bulldogs would undoubtedly match, leaving North to likely take Elijah Hollands, while Sydney may have eyes on Will Phillips or Denver Grainger-Barras. Gold Coast is said to be eying an inside midfielder so if Phillips is off the board, Tanner Bruhn comes into consideration. Essendon’s consecutive picks, which may not be held on to, could yield academy bids for the likes of Braeden Campbell and Lachlan Jones, as well as Reef McInnes if the Bombers are really keen on that inside midfielder. Given Collingwood would perhaps think twice about matching a top 10 pick for McInnes, Archie Perkins could be the Bombers’ man, with Riley Thilthorpe a chance to slide and Zach Reid another tall in the mix. The likes of Heath Chapman, Oliver Henry, and Nikolas Cox are others in the top 10 frame as it stands.

EXPLAINER | Pocket Podcast: The best AFL Draft hands

OVER the past few weeks, Draft Central launched its brand new series of pocket podcasts, a collection of short-form discussions which narrow in on a range of topics heading into the 2020 AFL Draft. In the next edition, Chief Editor Peter Williams again sat down with AFL Draft Editor Michael Alvaro, this time to discuss which clubs hold the best hands heading into the 2020 AFL Draft.

While the indicative draft order is set to undergo a raft of changes in the build up to draft day (December 9), the discussion highlighted three teams which were head and shoulders above the rest of the competition in terms of their pick hauls as of the end of trade period. Adelaide, Greater Western Sydney (GWS), and Essendon were the sides in question, though the positions of all 18 teams also came under the microscope; touching on pure draft value index points, flexibility and potential to trade, and likely academy or father-son selections.

To listen to the discussion in full, click here.

Below is a recap of what makes the three aforementioned clubs’ draft hands so strong:
(All picks are as of November 18)

Adelaide
Picks: 1, 9, 22, 23, 40, 56, 66, 80

Having finished bottom, the Crows have all the power with pick one for the first in their history and will likely use it to gain one of Logan McDonald or Riley Thilthorpe. Afterwards is where it gets interesting, as Adelaide could opt to split pick nine or use it to get into next year’s top 10 as the 2021 crop looks a strong one. The Crows also have three prospects already tied to them in Tariek Newchurch (NGA), James Borlase (NGA), and Luke Edwards (father-son). As it stands, Newchurch is likely to attract the first bid and one for Borlase will hopefully come after their current pick 40. The Crows could be left with a tricky decision as to whether they match for Edwards, who is also flirting with nominating for the open draft. Either way, Adelaide must nail this intake and lay a strong marker for its rebuild.

GWS
Picks: 10, 13, 15, 20, 29, 52, 74, 88

An exodus of sorts sees the Giants hold five picks within the top 30, four of which land among the first round. While the loss of Jeremy Cameron will be felt immediately, GWS has the opportunity to stock up with high-quality long-term options and avoid another steep drop off after finishing 10th in 2020. Alternatively, the Giants could use their picks in the teens to try and enter next year’s first round, or even sneak further into this year’s top 10 should a likely suitor wish to split their picks. Josh Green, the brother of Tom looks set to be the Giants’ sole academy selection this year but holds a value which will be relatively straightforward to match with one of their late picks, if necessary. GWS could be one of the busier clubs in the lead up to draft day and has plenty of potential to extract from its current hand.

Essendon
Picks: 6, 7, 8, 44, 77, 85, 87

The third of three clubs to currently hold a total points value of over 5000, Essendon may also become the first club since the expansion era to take three top 10 picks into the draft. What the Bombers decide to do with those picks is anyone’s guess given the flexibility afforded to them, and that there looms a few long-term list needs which require attendance. It seems as if they will opt to part ways with at least one of their top 10 selections, again either keen on next year’s crop or to expand their options in the first round. Another interesting scenario would be to package a couple of those picks to move into the top five, with Logan McDonald a prospect of particular interest. The Bombers also look set to bring in a couple of promising NGA talls in Cody Brand and Josh Eyre, with the latter potentially attracting a bid before the their current round three selection. There is likely enough cover for Eyre later on, though Essendon may also opt to bolster that late hand for any advanced bids.

>> Power Rankings: November Update

Past Episodes:

Best readymade prospects
Best players under 175cm
Best midfielders over 190cm
Logan McDonald vs. Jamarra Ugle-Hagan
Best academy and father-son hauls
Brayden Cook vs. Conor Stone
Key defenders kicking comparison
Offence from defence
Denver Grainger-Barras vs. Heath Chapman
The top non-aligned midfielders

EXPLAINER | Pocket Podcast: The best readymade prospects

OVER the past few weeks, Draft Central launched its brand new series of pocket podcasts, a collection of short-form discussions which narrow in on a range of topics heading into the 2020 AFL Draft. In the next edition, Chief Editor Peter Williams again sat down with AFL Draft Editor Michael Alvaro to compare and contrast the best readymade prospects available in this year’s AFL Draft pool.

These are the players which clubs will hope can make an immediate impact at AFL level upon being drafted, possessing just the right balance of athletic traits and natural footballing nous to hit the ground running in Round 1. Clubs in the premiership window could be among those to look for talents in that mould, whether it be mature-bodied players, or those who are mature-age. This year’s intake will be of particular interest in this department given about half of the crop has not gained any top-age exposure. It begs the question, will clubs then prioritise state league talents who are proven quantities?

To listen to the discussion in full, click here.

Below are some of the players which headed discussions, split into their positions:
Click on their names highlighted in red for full draft profiles.

Key Forwards:
Logan McDonald – Was a standout key forward throughout the full WAFL League season, showcasing terrific forward craft and providing constant scoreboard impact. Has the endurance and one-on-one game to play Round 1.
Jackson Callow – A big-bodied key forward who thrived at senior TSL level, Callow is one of the best pure contested marks in this year’s crop. Has some aspects to work on, but is ready to go in terms of his frame.

Key Defenders:
Denver Grainger-Barras – Another top five prospect who played a full season of senior football, Grainger-Barras is a lean type but has the kind of athleticism and competitiveness to make an impact at the elite level. An intercept marking machine.
Heath Chapman – Chapman earned a League berth for West Perth late in the season, but proved a class above Colts level. He is also aerially gifted but has a high-level endurance base and the scope to adapt to a number of roles across the backline.
James Borlase – The Adelaide NGA prospect has developed at a steep rate to become a genuine draft candidate in 2020, partly due to the presence he has on-field with such a mature frame and sound reading of the play. Also broke the senior ranks for Sturt.

Small-Medium Forwards:
James Rowe – Has arguably come back stronger after earning a state combine invite last year, topping the SANFL goalkicking charts with elite-level smarts and natural ability inside 50. He is a mature-age candidate at 21-years-old and could immediately assume a small forward role.
Errol Gulden – There is not much of him at 175cm/75kg, but Gulden has prospered to prove a game winner at each level he has played. One of two Swans Academy members pressing for first round honours come draft time.

General Defenders:
Lachlan Jones – Jones cuts a mean figure in defence and plays in a similar manner, providing great physicality and versatility across the back half. The Port NGA member can play tall and small, faring well aerially while also carving up the opposition on the rebound.
Tom Highmore – Another mature-age prospect, Highmore is a high marking intercept defender who transitioned seamlessly from the NEAFL, to SANFL football this year. He has the body and senior experience to be a serious impact player early on.
Mitch Duval – Duval has come from a long way back to come into draft contention this year. The 23-year-old West Adelaide defender is another interceptor and earned a National Combine invite for his form in 2020.

Midfielders:
Will Phillips – Arguably the best pure midfielder available in this year’s draft, Phillips looks a nailed-on 200-gamer from the outset. He cut his teeth at the centre bounces alongside Matt Rowell and Noah Anderson last year, playing part in Oakleigh’s NAB League premiership.
Alex Davies – Tied to the SUNS Academy, Davies will be pre-listed by Gold Coast and effectively cost nothing. He’s a tall, big-bodied type who wins plenty of contested ball and is quite poised in congestion.
Oliver Davis – One of the best Tasmanians available, Davis won the TSL Rising Star award in 2020 and made its Team of the Year as one of the competition’s premier inside midfielders. You know what to expect from Davis and he has no trouble finding the ball.

>> Power Rankings: November Update

Past Episodes:

Best players under 175cm
Best midfielders over 190cm
Logan McDonald vs. Jamarra Ugle-Hagan
Best academy and father-son hauls
Brayden Cook vs. Conor Stone
Key defenders kicking comparison
Offence from defence
Denver Grainger-Barras vs. Heath Chapman
The top non-aligned midfielders

EXPLAINER | Pocket Podcast: The best 175cm and below players

OVER the past few weeks, Draft Central launched its brand new series of pocket podcasts, a collection of short-form discussions which narrow in on a range of topics heading into the 2020 AFL Draft. In the next edition, Chief Editor Peter Williams again sat down with AFL Draft Editor Michael Alvaro to compare and contrast the best players who measure up at under 175cm, available in this year’s AFL Draft pool.

The saying goes ‘if you’re good enough, you’re big enough’, and the players covered in this pocket podcast have certainly been out to prove as much. In an age where prototype athletes and strong-bodied prospects are perhaps more in-vogue than natural footballers outside of that mould, players below 175cm are often forced to showcase at least one elite trait; whether it be speed, defensive pressure, disposal efficiency, or decision making. Smaller players are often among the most smart and skilful afield, with the bunch mentioned here fitting that description.

To listen to the discussion in full, click here.

Here are pocket profiles on some of the players mentioned:
(Click their names highlighted in red for full draft profiles)

Jake Bowey (Sandringham Dragons)
Outside Midfielder/Forward
12/09/2002 | 175cm | 67kg

An outside midfielder who locked down the wing position for Sandringham last year. Is a terrific athlete across the board and possesses wickedly quick skills. May start out as a small forward at the next level as he is still quite light, while boasting the defensive pressure and smarts to do so.

Draft Range: 15-35

Corey Durdin (Central District)
Small Forward/Midfielder
14/04/2002 | 173cm | 73kg

A midfielder at junior level who has transitioned to the small forward role of late. Has two years of senior SANFL experience and is a formidable ground level player who attacks the ball with vigour. Inside 50, his turn of speed, footy IQ, defensive pressure, and work-rate come to the fore.

Draft Range: 25-40

Errol Gulden (Sydney Swans Academy)
Outside Midfielder/Small Utility
18/07/2002 | 175cm | 75kg

One of two first round candidates out of the Swans Academy, Gulden is a high-level performer no matter the competition. He finds buckets of the ball and is particularly dangerous by foot on the attack, plying his trade mostly on the wing or at half-forward, where he will likely play at the elite level.

Draft Range: 15-30

Phoenix Spicer (South Adelaide)
Outside Midfielder/Small Forward
30/01/2002 | 173cm | 64kg

Perhaps the lightest and most raw prospect of the lot, but also one of the most exciting. Gained Reserves experience after lighting up the Under 18s with his speed and attacking intent on the outside, while also finding the goals regularly. A prospect with massive upside overall and development left.

Draft Range: 40+

Joel Western (Claremont)
Midfielder/Small Forward
12/10/2002 | 172cm | 68kg

Fremantle Next Generation Academy prospect who is elite athletically and provides a spark out of the middle. May not immediately yield midfield time but is just as capable inside 50 where his clean hands and skills help him stand out. Also Claremont’s Colts captain and a 2019 premiership player.

Draft Range: 25-40

>> Power Rankings: November Update

Past Episodes:

Best midfielders over 190cm
Logan McDonald vs. Jamarra Ugle-Hagan
Best academy and father-son hauls
Brayden Cook vs. Conor Stone
Key defenders kicking comparison
Offence from defence
Denver Grainger-Barras vs. Heath Chapman
The top non-aligned midfielders

EXPLAINER | Pocket Podcast: The best midfielders over 190cm

OVER the past few weeks, Draft Central launched its brand new series of pocket podcasts, a collection of short-form discussions which narrow in on a range of topics heading into the 2020 AFL Draft. In the next edition, Chief Editor Peter Williams again sat down with AFL Draft Editor Michael Alvaro to compare and contrast the best midfielders over 190cm available in this year’s AFL Draft pool. It is a prototype which is in vogue at the moment among AFL circles, with clubs keen to uncover the next Nat Fyfe, Patrick Cripps, or Marcus Bontempelli with tall midfielders who are contested beasts and can take ahold of games.

For the most part, the discussion centred around three key draft talents in said category; Alex Davies, Reef McInnes, and Caleb Poulter. Each of them are regarded as top 25 talents in this year’s crop and shape as the three best 190cm-plus midfielders. Unfortunately for the sake of most fans, both Davies (Gold Coast) and McInnes (Collingwood) are already tied to AFL clubs through their respective academy systems. Davies is set to be pre-listed by the Suns, while Oakleigh’s McInnes could attract a bid between picks 15 and 25. That leaves Poulter, a South Australian bolter of sorts who is the ideal hybrid type and may have clubs fighting over his services in the late-first to early-second round.

To listen to the discussion in full, click here.

PLAYER PROFILES

(click on their names highlighted in red for full draft profiles)

Alex Davies
Gold Coast Academy/Allies

Height: 192cm
Weight: 85kg
DOB: March 18, 2002

Plays… almost exclusively on the inside as a primary ball winner.

Reef McInnes
Oakleigh Chargers/Vic Metro

Height: 193cm
Weight: 86kg
DOB: December 12, 2002

Plays… at both ends when required, but thrives on the inside with his size and athleticism.

Caleb Poulter
WWT Eagles/South Australia

Height: 192cm
Weight: 79kg
DOB: October 12, 2002

Plays… inside, outside, and up forward with great presence and class.

Other players who entered the discussion include:

Josh Green – brother of Tom who is also tied to the GWS Academy, can play key position or inside midfield.
Lachlan Carrigan – Sandringham wingman who is developing quickly, runs well and has a damaging kick.
Saxon Crozier – Brisbane Academy product who is versatile but outside leaning, and boasts a thumping boot.
Aiden Fyfe – Gold Coast Academy wingman/half-back who is highly athletic and may attract interest from other clubs.

The likes of Elijah Hollands (189cm), Archie Perkins (188cm), Jack Carroll (187cm), and Nathan O’Driscoll (187cm) were among the first round candidates to narrowly miss the 190cm cut, but are similarly tall midfielders who could provide the same kind of value as those listed above.

>> Power Rankings: November Update

Past Episodes:

Logan McDonald vs. Jamarra Ugle-Hagan
Best academy and father-son hauls
Brayden Cook vs. Conor Stone
Key defenders kicking comparison
Offence from defence
Denver Grainger-Barras vs. Heath Chapman
The top non-aligned midfielders