Tag: Father Son

2021 AFL Academy Squad announced

21 elite top-age prospects have been named in the 2021 AFL Academy squad, as the AFL reverts back to a condensed nationwide program. Previously, the intake entailed as many as 150 talents from around the nation being nurtured in their state hubs, but with cost cutting at the hands of COVID-19 the traditional model will be reinstated.

The squad, coached by former Collingwood defender Tarkyn Lockyer, is set to play a game against a Victorian state league side and participate in camps during the year. Players are still set to be added to the list with a number of spots left vacant, as the AFL and club recruiters collaborate to finalise the intake.

Among the standouts, current pick one frontrunner Jason Horne joins the likes of Collingwood father-son hopeful Nick Daicos in the squad. Horne has already gained senior SANFL experience with South Adelaide and has a wide range of weapons, including his speed, ball winning ability, and aerial prowess. Daicos, the son of Peter, has all the skill his pedigree would suggest and enters the elite pathway with a great reputation in the APS competition under his belt.

Victorians dominate the squad with 10 selections, with a far less compromised top-end highlighting the lucky dip that is the AFL Draft. Aside from Daicos, Jase Burgoyne (Port Adelaide, father-son), Austin Harris (Gold Coast, Academy), and Ned Stevens (Gold Coast, Darwin zone) are the only other selections with ties to clubs. In another shift from this year’s cohort, it looks set to be a talent pool consisting largely of midfielders at the top end.

>> A look ahead: 21 in 2021
>> 2021 AFL Women’s Academy

2021 AFL ACADEMY:

Braden Andrews (Vic Metro/Oakleigh Chargers)
Sam Banks (Tasmania/Clarence)
Rhett Bazzo (Western Australia/Swan Districts)
Jase Burgoyne (South Australia/Woodville West Torrens)
Campbell Chesser (Vic Country/Sandringham Dragons)
Nick Daicos (Vic Metro/Oakleigh Chargers)
Josh Fahey (NSW/ACT/GWS Academy)
Cooper Hamilton (Vic Country/Bendigo Pioneers)
Austin Harris (Queensland/Gold Coast Academy)
Ben Hobbs (Vic Country/GWV Rebels)
Jason Horne (South Australia/South Adelaide)
Blake Howes (Vic Metro/Sandringham Dragons)
Matthew Johnson (Western Australia/Subiaco)
Cooper Murley (South Australia/Norwood)
Josh Rachele (Vic Country/Murray Bushrangers)
Matthew Roberts (South Australia/South Adelaide)
Josh Sinn (Vic Metro/Sandringham Dragons)
Tyler Sonsie (Vic Metro/Eastern Ranges)
Ned Stevens (Northern Territory/Waratah/Gold Coast Academy)
Jacob Van Rooyen (Western Australia/Claremont)
Jack Williams (Western Australia/East Fremantle)

Featured Image: Joshua Rachele looms as a top prospect in 2021 | Credit: Darrian Traynor/AFL Photos

2020 AFL Draft recap: Richmond Tigers

BACK-TO-BACK reigning premiers, Richmond has not had a massive amount to do with the draft in recent years, with squad depth the main area of focus rather than specific needs. Having taken a first rounder in each of the last three drafts, the Tigers opted to trade out of the pointy end this time around, instead stocking plenty of ammunition for a bumper 2021 crop or future trade flex. Only two selections were made at the National Draft, while one Category B rookie listing capped off a total haul of three new players set to grace Punt Road Oval in 2021, wearing the famous yellow and black.

RICHMOND

National Draft:
#40 Samson Ryan (Sherwood/Brisbane Lions Academy/Allies)
#51 Maurice Rioli Jnr (Oakleigh Chargers/NT Thunder/Allies)

Rookies:
Mate Colina (Cat B)

Having dealt with Geelong to move out of this year’s first round and into that of 2021, Richmond’s first live selection came all the way back at Pick 40. With tall stocks a key area of fulfilment in the long-term, the Tigers went with 206cm ruckman Samson Ryan and kept with their recent theme of targeting Brisbane Lions Academy graduates. The raw 20-year-old prospect is a little further along than other rucks available and impressed as Sherwood’s primary ruck during this year’s QAFL season. He is a mobile type whose potential comes in clean skills and a steady rate of improvement for someone of his size.

Richmond was then made to match a bid for father-son talent Maurice Rioli Jnr, one of the more talked about prospects in this year’s pool. Essendon was the team to put Richmond on the clock before passing on the next pick, as the Tigers took little time to match for their man. As one would come to expect from such a famous name, Rioli is an all-action small forward with great speed and goal sense, while his punishing tackling pressure is sure to suit Richmond’s current style beautifully. He joins cousin, Daniel at the club and will look to replicate the grand success of his late father, Maurice in the yellow and black.

Seven-foot monster, Mate Colina was the Tigers’ sole rookie selection, a Category B listee who comes from a college basketball background. Along similar lines to their acquisition of Ryan and a bunch of other developing talls over the years, the Tigers have looked long-term in this department and especially so given the pecking order is set to shuffle as Ivan Soldo recovers from his long-term knee injury in 2021. Overall, a hat-trick of fresh faces enter Tigerland with a handy sense of familiarity given family links and the Queensland theme.

VIDEO RECAP:

Featured Image: Richmond father-son draftee Maurice Rioli Jnr trains | Credit: (Retrieved from) @Richmond_FC via Twitter

2020 AFL Draft recap: Port Adelaide

HAVING obtained some of the competition’s most exciting young talent at the most recent few drafts, Port Adelaide had far less flex to get creative in 2020. This year’s minor premiers went in knowing that their star Next Generation Academy (NGA) product would attract a first round bid, and only had one more pick to make after matching in that exact range. A long-term selection rounded out the Power’s National Draft intake before a couple of familiar names, both young and experienced, entered the ranks as rookies the very next day.

PORT ADELAIDE

National Draft:
#16 Lachlan Jones (Woodville West-Torrens/South Australia)
#49 Ollie Lord (Sandringham Dragons/Vic Metro)

Rookies:
Taj Schofield (Woodville West Torrens), Tyson Goldsack

Port staff would have breathed a sigh of relief when Essendon opted not to place a bid on NGA product Lachlan Jones within the top 10, with Adelaide and GWS other suitors immediately after. Collingwood ended up being the club to pull the trigger at Pick 16, making the decision to match an easy one for Port Adelaide. The brutish defender is a readymade prospect at 186cm/89kg and is fresh off a terrific season with SANFL premier, Woodville-West Torrens. He blends attack on the ball and rebound penetration with a strong defensive acumen, making him a versatile type who looks like slotting straight into the Power’s back six.

Pick 49 was Port’s next point of call and Ollie Lord was the name called out. The Sandringham Dragons graduate is a key forward who continues to grow, with Power recruiters are high on his athleticism and competitiveness. Port’s current key forward stocks mean Lord will be allowed some time to develop and hone his craft after little exposure at NAB League level, though his APS performances for Geelong Grammar last year pointed towards plenty of promise. He is also the grandson of 1962 Brownlow Medallist, Alistair Lord.

Looking at the rookie intake, and Port pulled a surprise by announcing they were set to add formerly retired Collingwood defender, Tyson Goldsack to their list. The addition of father-son prospect, Taj Schofield was far less surprising after the Power committed to him beforehand, with his availability outside of the National Draft a nice bonus. He brings a neat set of skills on the outside and plenty of versatility to play as a half-forward or half-back given his typically clean disposal between the arcs. He is another who will be given time to develop, with durability a slight concern across his junior career.

VIDEO RECAP:

 

Featured Image: Port draftees Taj Schofield (middle) and Lachlan Jones (right) train in familiar colours | Credit: (Retrieved from) @PAFC via Twitter

Rookie Rundown: The picks you might have missed

THE 2020 AFL National and Rookie Drafts have been run and done, with plenty of fresh faces entering the elite system despite limited exposure, opportunities, and football this year. Often times, the best gems and values picks are found in the Rookie Draft and this year is no different, with a bunch of selections not read out during the official event seeing hot prospects get their chance. We take you through some of the names who have snuck onto lists via pre-listing or Category B eligibility, perhaps flying under the radar having been confirmed away from the glamour of draft night.

>> NATIONAL DRAFT: Club-by-club picks
>> ROOKIE DRAFT: Full order

Gold Coast is arguably the team with most relevance to this kind of category, with a total of five pre-listings made as part of the Suns’ draft concessions. Top 25 talents Alex Davies and Joel Jeffrey made their way onto the primary list, with the former an academy product and the latter aligned through Gold Coast’s access to the Darwin zone. Davies is a tall inside midfielder who thrives at the contest with great poise and clean extraction, while Jeffrey is an athletic swingman who stands out aerially and has great upside.

Rhys Nicholls and Aiden Fyfe are other academy graduates who were called out during the Rookie Draft, both promising to add some outside run and class to the Suns’ squad. Their listings were somewhat of a formality, but also show the growth of Gold Coast’s talent program. International scholarship holder Hewago Paul Oea earned a Category B slot after being overlooked last year, potentially bringing great speed and excitement to the forward half. ‘Ace’, as he is affectionately known, hails from Papua New Guinea and represented the Allies during last year’s Under 18 championships.

Another Queensland academy product in Carter Michael also earned rookie selection, pre-listed by Brisbane having been an integral part of the Lions’ pathway setup. The versatile midfielder’s selection slipped under the radar and was only announced after the fact, but he has long been linked with a spot on the Lions’ list. He is a Category A rookie, while Irish convert Deividas Uosis has been listed as a Category B prospect. The Lithuanian-born athlete was announced as a Lions coup early in 2020, but will only officially join their list come 2021.

Will Shaw was somewhat of a surprise get by GWS, with Marc Sheather Sydney’s only other academy selection after matching bids for Braeden Campbell and Errol Gulden. Shaw is a former Giants Academy member who played for both Murray and Bendigo in the NAB League but was overlooked as a top-ager before getting his chance with the Giants, who value his outside run and class. He was eligible for selection as he falls in the Giants’ NSW zone. Sheather is a versatile option for the Swans who can play above his size up forward, down back, or even through midfield. He has athletic traits which appeal and a readymade kind of build. Both are said to have been put into Category B slots.

Adelaide wasted little time in announcing the Category B listings of Next Generation Academy (NGA) members James Borlase and Tariek Newchurch, who managed to slip through past the National Draft. Both are fast-developing talents, with Borlase a strongly-built defender who is the son of 246-game Port Adelaide champion Darryl, while Newchurch is a zippy small forward with x-factor and a wonderful eye for goal. They are far from the finished product, but could play a part in the Crows’ rebuild having capped off a massive overall draft haul.

Elsewhere, a couple of monster basketball converts also earned Category B selection, with Paul Tsapatolis landing at Geelong and Mate Colina snapped up by Richmond. Melbourne NGA prospect Deakyn Smith carries some interest after missing out on this intake, but will train with the club in hopes of nabbing a spot in future. Port Adelaide father-son Taj Schofield was one who did find a home in the Rookie Draft after the Power committed to him, adding great value at essentially no cost.

Featured Image: Gold Coast Category B rookie Hewago Paul Oea | Credit: SUNS Media

A look ahead: The 21 top prospects for 2021

WHILE we are only a day removed from the 2020 AFL National Draft, Draft Central is already looking forward to the next crop of elite level hopefuls. This year’s AFL Draft Guide featured 21 of the best top-age prospects eligible to be drafted in 2021, providing pocket profiles and an insight into what to expect from a upcoming bumper crop. Clubs have already been jostling for position among next year’s order, as plenty of players do the same at the top end with their on-field efforts. We have already identified an early frontrunner, with a familiar father-son name not far off and plenty of variety in terms of representatives from each state and territory.

21 in 2021

The top contender:

Jason Horne (South Adelaide/South Australia)
21/06/2003 | 182cm/75kg
Inside Midfielder/Forward

Horne is the current frontrunner among next year’s crop after returning a sensational season of football. Having already established himself among South Adelaide’s Under 18 setup, he quickly came to dominate this year’s proceedings and earned a call-up to the senior side. He adapted well to the speed of the game playing mostly as a forward, soaring for high marks and backing his speed across the ground. The 2019 SA Under 16 MVP has very few weaknesses, but plenty of weapons at his disposal.

Braden Andrews (Oakleigh Chargers/Vic Metro)
21/02/2003 | 189cm/83kg
Midfielder/Utility

Somewhat a jack of all trades, Andrews plugged gaps on each line for Vic Metro at last year’s Under 16 championships; showing clean hands, a cool head, and match-winning abilities. Rates highly for upside.

Samuel Banks (Clarence/Tasmania)
2/04/2003 | 186cm/72kg
Midfielder/Half-Back

Arguably Tasmania’s leading 2021 prospect, Banks was the Under 16 Division 2 MVP last year and has already turned out for the Tasmania Devils Under 18 side. The balanced midfielder/half-back has also played senior football for Clarence, showing plenty of class while disposing by foot.

Rhett Bazzo (Swan Districts/Western Australia)
17/10/2003 | 194cm/74kg
Tall Defender

One of Western Australia’s top talents heading into 2021, Bazzo is a versatile defender renowned for his intercept marking ability. He could well blaze a trail similar to that of fellow Swan Districts product, Denver Grainger-Barras having established himself among the Colts side and in the PSA competition this year.

Cooper Beecken (Glenelg/South Australia)
24/02/2003 | 188cm/72kg
Defender

A tall and rangy defender, Beecken staked his claim as a potential high-end prospect for 2021 with a promising showing in this year’s Under 18 All-Stars game. It capped off a solid season overall for the 17-year-old, who holds similarities to Will Day with his stature, marking and kicking abilities.

Lachlan Brooks (Sandringham Dragons/Vic Metro)
1/02/2003 | 179cm/75kg
Inside Midfielder

Brooks earned Under 16 All Australian honours after an outstanding carnival for Vic Metro where he showcased great grit and ball winning ability at the contest. He was looking to make his way into Sandringham’s side as a small defender this year, while also playing midfield for Brighton Grammar.

Campbell Chesser (Sandringham Dragons/Vic Country)
27/04/2003 | 185cm/79kg
Half-Back/Wing

Hailing from Murray’s region, Chesser boards at Melbourne Grammar and is set to represent Sandringham during his NAB League stints. He is a rebounding half-back who can also provide dash off the wing, boasting great speed and a wicked boot on the outer.

Nick Daicos (Oakleigh Chargers/Vic Metro)
01/03/2003 | 183cm/72kg
Balanced Midfielder

He has only just entered the Oakleigh Chargers system, but Daicos is already well-known not only for his exploits with Carey Grammar in the APS competition, but also for his ties to Collingwood as a father-son prospect. He has terrific skills and ironically supports Carlton. Already a top five chance.

Arlo Draper (South Adelaide/South Australia)
30/01/2003 | 185cm/71kg
Midfielder/Forward

A smooth-moving type with plenty of upside, Draper returned a fantastic bottom-age season with South Adelaide to prove on of South Australia’s brightest 2021 candidates. He wins a good amount of contested ball while also providing marking and goal threats up forward.

Joshua Fahey (Gold Coast Academy/NSW/ACT)
11/11/2003 | 186cm/76kg
Half-Back/Outside Midfielder

While formerly tied to the GWS Academy, Fahey represented that of the Gold Coast Suns this year and showed fine form. He is a damaging rebound defender who gains plenty of meterage with his daring dash and raking left boot.

Ben Hobbs (GWV Rebels/Vic Country)
15/09/2003 | 182cm/76kg
Inside Midfielder

There are few others who show quite the appetite Hobbs does for the contest, and soggy conditions at last year’s Under 16 championships saw him thrive. Having since made his NAB League debut, Hobbs continues to pump the ball forward and tackle hard at the coalface.

Matthew Johnson (Subiaco/Western Australia)
16/03/2003 | 192cm/80kg
Inside Midfielder

Subiaco Colts premiership player, Johnson developed well in 2020 to become one of his state’s leading midfielders. He has a terrific balance of aggression and class, able to win his own ball and carve ways around his opponents on the exit. Has great upside as a raw, tall ball winner.

Alex Lukic (Oakleigh Chargers/Vic Metro)
7/01/2003 | 195cm/86kg
Key Forward

Lukic is an athletic tall forward who fares particularly well close to goal. After leading the Under 16 Division 1 goalkicking with nine majors, he made his NAB League debut in a stacked Oakleigh side and showed plenty of promise. Has good speed and can compete at ground level.

Charlie Molan (GWV Rebels/Vic Country)
23/01/2003 | 186cm/78kg
Midfielder/Utility

A hard-working midfielder who can play a role on each line, Molan brings a true team-first attitude. He made his NAB League debut last year and has some good upside given his size and versatility. One who you can rely on to compete.

Cooper Murley (Norwood/South Australia)
20/06/2003 | 177cm/66kg
Small Midfielder/Forward

Part of Norwood’s Under 18 premiership side, Murley already looks a class above the grade. His speed out of congestion, repeat forward running, and excellent skills made for scintillating viewing in 2020, making him a prime prospect for next year. Still has some filling out to do.

Joshua Rachele (Murray Bushranger/Vic Country)
11/04/2003 | 179cm/77kg
Small Midfielder/Forward

Rachele rightly took out the Division 1 and Vic Country MVP awards at last year’s Under 16 carnival, putting him firmly in the pick one race. He went on to average two goals per his four NAB League games, bringing plenty of x-factor up forward and spark through midfield.

Lewis Rayson (Glenelg/South Australia)
14/01/2003 | 181cm/64kg
Half-Back

A small defender who impacts in a big way, Rayson provides plenty of drive from half-back. His ability to read the play and break forward quickly in transition is a real asset, capped off by damaging use by foot.

Matthew Roberts (South Adelaide/South Australia)
31/07/2003 | 183cm/76kg
Midfielder/Forward

Roberts is a standout wherever he plays and dominated both the school football and SANFL Under 18 scenes at times in 2020. He is capable of racking up huge numbers through sheer work-rate and competitiveness, while also posing a scoring threat when resting up forward.

Josh Sinn (Sandringham Dragons/Vic Metro)
28/01/03 | 186cm/72kg
Half-Back/Midfielder

Was captain of Vic Metro’s carnival-winning Under 16 side in 2019 and adapted well between multiple roles. Originally employed as a half-back for his run and damaging use by foot, Sinn also thrived in midfield and somewhat of a wildcard. Has plenty of desirable traits and potential.

Tyler Sonsie (Eastern Ranges/Vic Metro)
27/01/2003 | 181cm/74kg
Midfielder/Forward

Another who has plenty of runs on the board already, Sonsie is silky smooth on the ball through midfield and dangerous around goal. He made his NAB League debut for minor premiers, Eastern Ranges after winning Vic Metro’s Under 16 MVP award.

Jacob Van Rooyen (Claremont/Western Australia)
16/04/2003 | 194cm/88kg
Key Forward

A dominant key forward with terrific aerial presence, Van Rooyen is one of the leading prospects in his position for 2021. He booted 19 goals in 10 WAFL Colts games this season, finding the big sticks at least once in each outing.

In the mix:

In such a promising crop, there are plenty of names who could have easily squeezed into the initial list. From a Victorian perspective, the likes of Lachlan Rankin and Youseph Dib are two exciting talents from the Oakleigh Chargers who featured strongly in the Metro Under 16 squad. Dib is tied to Collingwood as an NGA and plies his trade both inside, on the wing, or up forward, while Rankin is a classy user off half-back. Blake Howes was another standout on the Metro end and has great upside as a high-marking, athletic forward.

South Australians have benefitted greatly from a full state league season, albeit improvised. Morgan Ferres is a tall forward with terrific athleticism and the ability to dominate at centre half-forward. Nasiah Wanganeen and Jase Burgoyne were others to show plenty in the SANFL Under 18s this year, with the latter the son of Peter Burgoyne and thus tied to Port Adelaide as a father-son. Isaiah Dudley, the cousin of Kysaiah Pickett also has links to a club already in Adelaide. He is small, but has plenty of talent and should not be forgotten after an injury-riddled year.

West Australian prospects also benefitted from a season of football, with the likes of Lochlan Paton and Judd McVee both getting some Under 18 midfield minutes. Paton is a solid mover who can roam forward, while McVee is an explosive stoppage player who can also move on the outer. Joshua Browne is another name right up there after his efforts for East Fremantle in 2020, with Max Chipper another to keep in mind as a clean outside user.

Featured Image: Jason Horne is our top pick for 2021 | Credit: Deb Curtis/SANFL

2020 AFL Draft Preview: Western Bulldogs

WITH the 2020 trade period done and dusted, it is now time for clubs and fans alike to turn their attention to the draft. Between now and draft day (December 9), clubs will have the opportunity to exchange picks until the final order is formed a couple of days out. While the chaos ensues, Draft Central takes a look at how each club may approach the upcoming intake opportunities with the hand they formed at the close of trade period. Obviously they are still subject to heavy change, so perhaps we can predict some of that movement here.

Next under the microscope are the Western Bulldogs, one of the big winners out of this year’s trade period after nabbing Adam Treloar, holding Josh Dunkley, paying next to nothing for some ruck experience in Stefan Martin, and bringing Mitch Hannan back to Whitten Oval. They should also prove big winners on draft day given the consensus best player available, Jamarra Ugle-Hagan, is tied to their Next Generation Academy (NGA). On-field, the Dogs have snuck a game clear into finals twice in as many years, now boasting arguably the deepest midfield in the competition and plenty of stock to continue that trend in 2021.

>> 2020 AFL Draft Guide
>> Power Rankings: November Update

CURRENT PICKS: 29, 33, 41, 42, 52, 54

2021 PICKS: WB Round 1, WB Round 4

>> Podcast: The current best AFL Draft hands

ELIGIBLE ACADEMY/FATHER-SON PICKS:

Jamarra Ugle-Hagan (NGA), Ewan Macpherson (father-son), Cody Raak (NGA)

>> Podcast: The best academy/father-son hauls

LIST NEEDS:

Key position forward
Small forward depth

FIRST PICK OPTIONS:
(Pick 29)

The current figure of 29 as the Bulldogs’ opening pick can effectively be ignored, as at least their first four selections will be off the board when Jamarra Ugle-Hagan is bid on within the top three. As has been widely known for some time now, the Bulldogs will not think twice in matching said bid and obtaining much-needed key forward support for Aaron Naughton. Given the strength they have in midfield, aerial dominance and dynamism will be key to the Bulldogs’ forward game with those two in the same side.

Though Ugle-Hagan will inevitably act as the Dogs’ first pick, the hand they are left with will ultimately yield their selectors’ first genuine choice in the draft. There are three scenarios likely to play out; if Adelaide bids with pick one the Bulldogs will match and have their entire hand wiped out with leftover points yielding pick 66, if North Melbourne bids at pick two the Bulldogs will match and see their first four picks wiped while obtaining pick 73 with leftover points, and if Sydney bids at pick three the Bulldogs will match and again see their first four picks wiped, but gain the equivalent to pick 53 on leftover points.

With the late picks remaining, the Western Bulldogs could target some small forward depth, or look to pick up a developable tall for the long-term. Alternatively, it provides good cover for potential bids on Ewan Macpherson (father-son) or Cody Raak (NGA), but they are likely to be available as rookies.

LIVE TRADE OPTIONS:

Given the Bulldogs have already worked to manufacture a hand good enough to cover a top three bid for Ugle-Hagan, there is not much else they may seek to do in terms of live trading. Depending on where the bid comes and which picks they have leftover, the Bulldogs could decide to package the late selections and move slightly up the order to nab a player they are keen on. In scenario three, where Sydney is the team to bid, they could also use picks 52, 53, and 54 to trade back into next year’s draft given they only boast a first and fourth rounder there. Still, do not expect too much significant action from the Bulldogs in this department.

THE KEY QUESTIONS:

Will Adelaide bid on Ugle-Hagan with pick one?

How many more players will the Bulldogs take after Ugle-Hagan in the National Draft?

Will Macpherson and Raak attract bids, or slide to the Rookie Draft?

2020 AFL Draft Preview: West Coast Eagles

WITH the 2020 trade period done and dusted, it is now time for clubs and fans alike to turn their attention to the draft. Between now and draft day (December 9), clubs will have the opportunity to exchange picks until the final order is formed a couple of days out. While the chaos ensues, Draft Central takes a look at how each club may approach the upcoming intake opportunities with the hand they formed at the close of trade period. Obviously they are still subject to heavy change, so perhaps we can predict some of that movement here.

Next under the microscope is West Coast, a side now two seasons removed from its 2018 premiership triumph but still well within the flag hunt. The Eagles’ strong and mature core remains, but their recruiting staff will again have to get creative at the draft table with another set of late selections. Having only come into the equation at Pick 49 last year, the Eagles’ current first pick now lies all the way back at 62, which makes predicting their final draft hand all the more difficult. It may well be the case that in the current environment, West Coast only makes one selection at this year’s event.

>> 2020 AFL Draft Guide
>> Power Rankings: November Update

CURRENT PICKS: 62, 86, 90, 104, 115

2021 PICKS: WCE Rd 1 | WCE Rd 2, PTA Rd 2 | SYD Rd 3 | WCE Rd 4

>> Podcast: The current best AFL Draft hands

LIKELY ACADEMY/FATHER-SON PICKS:

Nil.

>> Podcast: The best academy/father-son hauls

LIST NEEDS:

Long-term squad depth

FIRST PICK OPTIONS:
(Pick 62)

Talk about a lucky dip. This year’s draft has been pegged as a ridiculously even one past pick 30, so just imagine the due diligence West Coast will have to do with its first selection coming at 62. Given the vast expanses the 2020 talent pool reaches, West Coast may be a club to look local with what will likely be its sole pick in the National Draft. The likes of Shannon Neale and Kalin Lane, two West Australian rucks, have been linked with the Eagles as long-term key position options. Both are late bloomers of sorts, with Neale an athletics convert and Lane a 19-year-old whose first full WAFL Colts season came this year.

Outside run and class could be another area of fulfilment for the Eagles, so they would be thrilled if a player of Isiah Winder‘s talent was still available in the fourth round. Defenders like Kellen Johnson and Jack Avery could also pique interest given their intercept and rebound qualities, though they are both far from the finished product. A mature-age coup may better suit West Coast’s list profile at this range, with creative South Australian defender Jacob Wehr entering the draft radar along with combine invitees Mitch Duval and Tom Highmore. While technically mature-age, they are all young enough to still provide long-term cove down back.

LIVE TRADE OPTIONS:

West Coast’s current 2020 hand does not offer much flex in terms of live trading, but the Eagles could table their future picks to potentially move up the order and grab a steal. They lay claim to Port’s second rounder and Sydney’s third so if only one prospect is to come through the door this year, those selections may be moved on in order to really make it a good one.

THE KEY QUESTIONS:

Will West Coast come away with just one National Draft selection?

What kind of role will West Coast look to stock long-term?

Can West Coast nab a major slider, or will it take a chance on less proven talent?

Will West Coast look local at the draft?

Featured Image: West Coast skipper Luke Shuey is set to welcome new draftees with open arms | Credit: AAP

2020 AFL Draft Preview: Richmond Tigers

WITH the 2020 trade period done and dusted, it is now time for clubs and fans alike to turn their attention to the draft. Between now and draft day (December 9), clubs will have the opportunity to exchange picks until the final order is formed a couple of days out. While the chaos ensues, Draft Central takes a look at how each club may approach the upcoming intake opportunities with the hand they formed at the close of trade period. Obviously they are still subject to heavy change, so perhaps we can predict some of that movement here.

Next under the microscope is Richmond, the reigning premier and most dominant team of the last five years. As has largely been the case over that time, the Tigers do not have any glaring list needs which require attendance at the draft, but will rather look to replenish their squad depth with a steady turnover of more mature players. In recent intakes, Richmond has done well to snare a highly-fancied prospect in the first round while also taking on some smokies at the back-end and also being impartial to an academy bid. While they won’t be massive players in this pool, there should be some good value to be had for the premiers.

>> Power Rankings: November Update

CURRENT PICKS*: 17, 36, 61, 79, 97

2021 PICKS*: RIC Rd 1 | RIC Rd 2, STK Rd 2 | RIC Rd 3, GCS Rd 3

* – denotes as of December 2

>> Podcast: The current best AFL Draft hands

LIKELY ACADEMY/FATHER-SON PICKS:

Maurice Rioli Jnr (father-son)

>> Podcast: The best academy/father-son hauls

LIST NEEDS:

Long-term squad depth

FIRST PICK OPTIONS:
(Pick 17)

With no glaring needs and some decent long-term midfield depth, the Tigers have a great opportunity to snare a slider or a players they rate highly at that range. Midfielders tend to be Richmond’s main type of choice at this range and that may again be an area which is bolstered given how the tall talent in this year’s pool falls. South Australian Tom Powell is arguably the most consistent ball winner available in the first round and is fresh off a SANFL Under 18s season in which he averaged over 35 disposals. He could be off the board, but would prove a very Richmond pick. Brayden Cook and Nathan O’Driscoll loom as developable options who could also come into consideration, with the former bolting into first round contention and the latter one whose range has been hotly debated. Cook looks likely to develop as a forward who thrives close to goal but can also play on the wing, while O’Driscoll is a hard-working midfielder who can play both inside and out. O’Driscoll could also be a half-back option early on, as Richmond needs long-term, much like fellow West Australian Jack Carroll. Carroll has garnered comparisons to Trent Cotchin, but has also cut his teeth off half-back. Richmond fans may wish for their club to target a tall and cover long-term depth there, but pick 36 may be a better range for that to happen.

LIVE TRADE OPTIONS:

The Tigers’ claim to a current first rounder, one for next year, and a couple more 2021 second-rounders makes them a team able to trade up if need be. However, the most likely live trade action from Richmond could surround if and when a bid comes in for father-son gun, Maurice Rioli Jnr. The son of Maurice Rioli is a small forward with great goal sense and defensive pressure, suiting Richmond’s game to a tee. While he is expected to attract suitors beyond Richmond’s current pick 36, he could also come into consideration for sides around that mark. That would set Richmond into action, looking to squeeze a pick in before the bid.

THE KEY QUESTIONS:

Where will a bid for Maurice Rioli Jnr come in?

Will Richmond target a tall with its second round pick?

Is another midfielder in the offing with pick 17?

Featured Image: Richmond father-son hopeful Maurice Rioli Jnr in action for St Mary’s | Credit: Keri Megelus/News Corp Australia

2020 AFL Draft Preview: Port Adelaide

WITH the 2020 trade period done and dusted, it is now time for clubs and fans alike to turn their attention to the draft. Between now and draft day (December 9), clubs will have the opportunity to exchange picks until the final order is formed a couple of days out. While the chaos ensues, Draft Central takes a look at how each club may approach the upcoming intake opportunities with the hand they formed at the close of trade period. Obviously they are still subject to heavy change, so perhaps we can predict some of that movement here.

Next under the microscope is Port Adelaide, this year’s minor premier and a side which has very few glaring list needs. The Power fared notoriously well in the first round of the last two drafts, establishing its future with the likes of Zak Butters, Connor Rozee, Xavier Duursma, and Mitch Georgiades at the pointy end. Given the team’s soaring success, its 2020 intake looms as a slightly different one to the aforementioned efforts. Next Generation Academy (NGA) product Lachlan Jones will inevitably be the Port’s first pick with a matched bid, leaving only late selections and a potential match for Taj Schofield as the only plays left.

>> Power Rankings: November Update

CURRENT PICKS*: 35, 47, 57, 59, 73, 95

2021 PICKS*: PTA Round 1 | PTA Round 2

* – denotes as of December 1

>> Podcast: The current best AFL Draft hands

LIKELY ACADEMY/FATHER-SON PICKS:

Lachlan Jones (NGA), Taj Schofield (father-son)

>> Podcast: The best academy/father-son hauls

LIST NEEDS:

Classy/efficient midfielder

FIRST PICK OPTIONS:
(Pick 35)

You can essentially ignore the Pick 35 figure here as Port’s first selection will inevitably be bumped up into the first round, where academy product Lachlan Jones is expected to yield a bid. Even with future selections added to the equation, it is highly unlikely that Port would or could move up far enough to get another player in before Jones. Any bid before Pick 12 would wipe out Port’s next four selections (35, 47, 57, 59) upon matching, leaving a pick in the 60s or 70s to work with. The Power would then be sweating on whether a club is interested in father-son hopeful Taj Schofield, who may have suitors within the National Draft. That would force Port to decide whether to match and most likely leave with just those two players, or pass and take another prospect they may have their eye on in the latter stages.

LIVE TRADE OPTIONS:

There is not too much Port may look to do in terms of live trading, but the Power’s first and second rounders for 2021 are banked as it stands. That second rounder could be used to secure another pick in this year’s intake and aid the matched Jones bid, potentially giving Port the option to take both Schofield and another player within the National Draft. Down the line, Port may look to get busy should a bid for Schofield come in, splitting or packaging their very late picks.

THE KEY QUESTIONS:

Will a bid for Lachlan Jones come within the top 10?

Will Taj Schofield slip through to the Rookie Draft?

Will Port Adelaide look to take three players in the National Draft?

Featured Image: Port NGA hopeful Lachlan Jones gets a kick away for WWT | Credit: Cory Sutton/SANFL

2020 AFL Draft Preview: North Melbourne

WITH the 2020 trade period done and dusted, it is now time for clubs and fans alike to turn their attention to the draft. Between now and draft day (December 9), clubs will have the opportunity to exchange picks until the final order is formed a couple of days out. While the chaos ensues, Draft Central takes a look at how each club may approach the upcoming intake opportunities with the hand they formed at the close of trade period. Obviously they are still subject to heavy change, so perhaps we can predict some of that movement here.

Next under the microscope is North Melbourne, a side which got busy during trade period amid great overall change at the club. After finishing 17th, the Roos gained access to pick two and have plenty of options to consider in their efforts to maximise this year’s draft haul. As it stands, North lays claim to the fourth-highest total draft points value heading into this year’s intake and has a great opportunity to form the base of what looms as a long rebuild under incoming coach, David Noble – though, those at Arden Street have different ideas. As was hardly the case on-field in 2020, North Melbourne will be an important player in what goes down during the draft period.

>> Power Rankings: November Update

CURRENT PICKS*: 2, 11, 30, 39, 71, 81

2021 PICKS*: NM Rd 1 | NM Rd 2 | NM Rd 3 | BRI Rd 4

* – denotes as of November 30

>> Podcast: The current best AFL Draft hands

LIKELY ACADEMY/FATHER-SON PICKS:

Nil.

>> Podcast: The best academy/father-son hauls

LIST NEEDS:

Key forward
Midfield depth

FIRST PICK OPTIONS:
(Pick 2)

It seems North Melbourne’s options have been whittled down to three or four avenues at the top end, including the chance that the Roos part with pick two altogether. Should the draft order remain as is, Elijah Hollands seems the most likely to land at Arden Street. The dynamic midfielder/forward would add some spark to North’s engine room while also potentially developing as a forward early on. He is coming off an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear suffered during preseason, but North showed little hesitation in selecting Jy Simpkin with its first pick in 2016 when he missed his top-age year off a badly broken leg. Will Phillips is another midfielder in contention, but North may look to favour Hollands’ upside and versatility.

There is a chance that Adelaide opts to select local key forward/ruck Riley Thilthorpe with pick one, leaving Logan McDonald to be snapped up by the Roos. The West Australian key forward would suit North’s needs perfectly with Ben Brown fresh out the door, looming as a readymade option after thriving at senior WAFL level in 2020. The Roos also have Nick Larkey and are high on Charlie Comben, but the chance to snare this level of key position player does not come around often. Speaking of key forwards, the Kangaroos may well be the ones to bid on Western Bulldogs NGA talent Jamarra Ugle-Hagan, who is the consensus best player in the draft pool. A bid would inevitably be matched, but they may as well get it out of the way before snapping up their own player.

LIVE TRADE OPTIONS:

A lot of the above discussion could be washed by North Melbourne’s potential to split pick two into a couple of top 10 picks. It is well known that Essendon is a club looking to move right up the order with eyes on McDonald and Hollands, making North a prime candidate to deal with. The Roos should be looking to maximise their hand at the top end given the state of their squad, so obtaining two of Essendon’s three-consecutive top-10’ers would be ideal. The Roos may have to give something back, perhaps pick 30 to make it a fair trade, but could extract some great value with a total of three first round selections. Should they opt against that play, the Roos might also look to package picks 30 and 39 to move up the order, or even to bolster their hand for next year’s intake.

THE KEY QUESTIONS:

Will North Melbourne part with pick two?

Will North Melbourne target key position stocks at the top end?

Will North Melbourne make the most selections of any club?