Tag: Callum Jamieson

2019 AFL Draft club review: West Coast Eagles

A PREMIERSHIP 12 months ago, another finals series and a huge inclusion over the off-season with Tim Kelly crossing from Geelong, West Coast was always going to be a quiet achiever in the AFL Draft period. The Eagles picked up two players – both West Australian as predicted by Draft Central prior to the draft – as well as a second Claremont player in the Rookie Draft, and a massive slider who could be the steal of the draft. West Coast also redrafted a couple of their delistees to put them back on the rookie list.

WEST COAST:

National Draft:
49. Callum Jamieson (Claremont/Western Australia) | 199cm | 84kg | Ruck/Forward
58. Ben Johnson (West Perth/Western Australia) | 178cm | 68kg | Small Defender

Rookie Draft:
11. Anthony Treacy (Claremont/Western Australia) | 182cm | 69kg | Medium Forward
25. Mitch O’Neill (Tasmania/Allies) | 176cm | 72kg | Balanced Midfielder
33. Brendon Ah Chee (West Coast Eagles)
39. Hamish Brayshaw (West Coast Eagles)

Entering the AFL National Draft at Pick 49, West Coast opted to go tall by plucking out local ruck, Callum Jamieson. Considered the fourth best ruck in the draft crop and the clear best available by the selection, Jamieson is an overager who is a year further advanced compared to his peers. At 199cm and 84kg he could still add more size to his frame but is more readymade than some other big men in the draft crop. He works hard around the ground and is more mobile than many might think, able to not only roam around the ground as a ruck, but go forward and rest to provide a leading target inside 50. He is strong overhead and whilst being a long-term prospect the Eagles fans might not see for a little bit, he will get plenty of experience working under Nic Naitanui.

With the second selection, the Eagles chose running defender Ben Johnson who might be small at 178cm, but he has a penetrating kick that is eye-catching as much as it is damaging to the opposition. At Pick 58, Johnson looms as good value and hailing from West Perth does not need to relocate for his senior football, staying in Western Australia. Like Jamieson, Johnson is lightly built and at 68kg and will need to spend a year in the gym adding size to his frame to compete against the stronger small forwards. He is most damaging with his offensive output through rebounding and running, though can play accountable football in the back half as a defensive player.

Looking to the Rookie Draft, the Eagles picked up late bloomer, Anthony Treacy and draft slider, Mitch O’Neill. Treacy, who rose all the way from the amateurs to have a good season with Claremont in the WAFL showing off his skills and decision making in the forward half. O’Neill similarly has terrific skills and decision making and might have been overlooked due to his 176cm and 72kg size, as well as his on-and-off ankle injuries. But without a doubt if O’Neill lives up to his potential, the dual All-Australian could make a lot of clubs look silly and be the value pick of this draft with his versatility and clean hands among his standout traits. Given that he was considered a first rounder by some prior to the season, Eagles fans should be over the moon to snaffle the Tasmanian at Pick 25 in the Rookie Draft. The Eagles concluded their draft period by redrafting Brendon Ah Chee and Hamish Brayshaw.

Overall, the Eagles were able to stay local for three of their four picks, then grabbed O’Neill to add class and massive value at that selection, making the most of a draft where their picks were not ideal.

2019 National AFL Draft: Round 2-5 selections

WITH Round 1 selections done and dusted on Wednesday night, Thursday hosted the remainder of the 2019 AFL National Draft, as we look a the top Australian rules talent being picked up across Australia. Below is every pick from the beginning of Round 2 with plenty of analysis to come on Draft Central over the next week.

For picks 1-21, check out the Round 1 Selections.

ROUND 2

Pick 22 – Brisbane Lions – Deven Robertson (Perth/Western Australia) | 184cm | 81kg | Inside Midfielder
Pick 23 – Port Adelaide – Dylan Williams (Oakleigh Chargers/Vic Metro) | 186cm | 81kg | Medium Forward
Pick 24 – Adelaide Crows – Harry Schoenberg (Woodville-West Torrens/South Australia) | 182cm | 83kg | Inside Midfielder
Pick 25 – Port Adelaide – Jackson Mead (Woodville-West Torrens/South Australia) | 183cm | 83kg | Balanced Midfielder
Pick 26 – Sydney Swans – Will Gould (Glenelg/South Australia) | 192cm | 106kg | Tall Defender
Pick 27 – Gold Coast SUNS – Jeremy Sharp (East Fremantle/Western Australia) | 189cm | 81kg | Midfielder/Defender
Pick 28 – Adelaide Crows – Josh Worrell (Sandringham Dragons/Vic Metro) | 195cm | 83kg | Key Position Utility
Pick 29 – Hawthorn – Finn Maginness (Sandringham Dragons/Vic Metro) | 189cm | 82kg | Inside Midfielder
Pick 30 – Essendon- Harrison Jones (Calder Cannons/Vic Metro) | 196cm | 78kg | Key Position Utility
Pick 31 – North Melbourne – Charlie Comben (Gippsland Power/Vic Country) | 199cm | 84kg | Ruck
Pick 32 – Melbourne – Trent Rivers (East Fremantle/Western Australia) | 188cm | 83kg | Defender/Midfielder
Pick 33 – Brisbane Lions – Brock Smith (Gippsland Power/Vic Country) | 189cm | 82kg | Tall Defender
Pick 34 – North Melbourne – Jack Mahony (Sandringham Dragons/Vic Metro) | 178cm | 72kg | Midfielder/Forward
Pick 35 – North Melbourne – Flynn Perez (Bendigo Pioneers/Vic Country) | 188cm | 81kg | Outside Midfielder
Pick 36 – Sydney Swans – Elijah Taylor (Perth/Western Australia) | 188cm | 77kg | Medium Forward
Pick 37 – Brisbane Lions – Keidean Coleman (Brisbane Lions Academy/Allies) | 183cm | 75kg | Medium Defender
Pick 38 – Essendon – Nick Bryan (Oakleigh Chargers/Vic Metro) | 202cm | 87kg | Ruck
Pick 39 – Sydney Swans – Chad Warner (East Fremantle/Western Australia) | 183cm | 83kg | Inside Midfielder
Pick 40 – Collingwood – Jay Rantall (GWV Rebels/Vic Country) | 185cm | 83kg | Balanced Midfielder
Pick 41 – Geelong – Francis Evans (Calder Cannons/Vic Metro) | 182cm | 78kg | Medium Forward
Pick 42 – Adelaide Crows –  Ronin O’Connor (Claremont/Western Australia) | 192cm | 83kg | Inside Midfielder
Pick 43 – Richmond – Noah Cumberland (Brisbane Lions Academy/Queensland) | 183cm | 79kg | Medium Utility
Pick 44 – Richmond – Will Martyn (Brisbane Lions Academy/Queensland) | 185cm | 83kg | Outside Midfielder

ROUND 3

Pick 45 – Collingwood – Trent Bianco (Oakleigh Chargers/Vic Metro) | 178cm | 73kg | Midfielder/Defender
Pick 46 – Richmond – Hugo Ralphsmith (Sandringham Dragons/Vic Metro) | 188cm | 75kg | Forward/Midfielder
Pick 47 – Carlton – Sam Ramsay (Calder Cannons/Vic Metro) | 180cm | 72kg | Balanced Midfielder
Pick 48 – Adelaide Crows – Lachlan Gollant (Calder Cannons/Vic Metro | 191cm | 72kg | Outside Midfielder
Pick 49 – West Coast Eagles – Callum Jamieson (Claremont/Western Australia) | 199cm | 84kg | Ruck
Pick 50 – Geelong – Cameron Taheny (Norwood/South Australia) | 185cm | 80kg | Medium Forward
Pick 51 – GWS GIANTS – Jake Riccardi (Werribee/VFL) | 194cm | 96kg | Key Forward
Pick 52 – St Kilda – Ryan Byrnes (Sandringham Dragons/Vic Metro) | 182cm | 84kg | Balanced Midfielder
Pick 53 – Western Bulldogs – Louis Butler (Sandringham Dragons/Vic Metro) | 185cm | 75kg | Medium Defender
Pick 54 – Richmond – Bigoa Nyuon (Dandenong Stingrays/Vic Country) | 195cm | 87kg | Key Position Utility

ROUND 4

Pick 55 – Collingwood – Trey Ruscoe (East Fremantle/Western Australia) | 192cm | 75kg | Defender/Midfielder
Pick 56 – Essendon – Ned Cahill (Dandenong Stingrays/Vic Country) | 179cm | 78kg | Small Forward
Pick 57 – Hawthorn – Josh Morris (Woodville-West Torrens/South Australia) | 186cm | 76kg | Medium Forward
Pick 58 – West Coast Eagles – Ben Johnson (West Perth/Western Australia) | 178cm | 68kg | Small Defender
Pick 59 – Brisbane Lions – Jaxon Prior (West Perth/Western Australia) | 189cm | 82kg | Tall Defender
Pick 60 – Gold Coast SUNS – Jy Farrar (Adelaide SANFL/South Australia) | 191cm | 79kg | Tall Utility
Pick 61 – Fremantle – Minairo Frederick (Woodville-West Torrens/South Australia) | 183cm | 71kg | Outside Midfielder
Pick 62 – Western Bulldogs – Riley Garcia (Swan Districts) | 177cm | 70kg | Balanced Midfielder

ROUND 5

Pick 63 – Essendon – Lachlan Johnson (Oakleigh Chargers) | 176cm | 74kg | Small Utility
Pick 64 – St Kilda – Leo Connolly (Gippsland Power) | 181cm | 74kg | Outside Midfielder
Pick 65 – GWS GIANTS – Tom Hutchesson (Adelaide SANFL/South Australia) | 177cm | 75kg | Outside Midfielder

2019 AFL Draft Preview: Western Bulldogs

WESTERN Bulldogs are coming off a much-needed finals series after a premiership three years ago where since that memorable day in 2016, the Dogs have not been able to maintain the rage. Showing some promising signs in the second half of 2019, the Western Bulldogs filled holes at either end of the ground by bringing in Alex Keath and Josh Bruce to fill key defensive posts, with perhaps one more needed in the defensive 50 to sure it up. They could also consider a small forward or outside player with some speed and skill to complement their exciting young list which is building towards something special.

CURRENT PICKS: 13, 53, 89, 107, 125.

NEXT GEN ACADEMY/FATHER-SONS – COMBINE INVITES: Nil.

LIST NEEDS:

Small forward with speed and skill
Tall Defender
Midfield depth

FIRST PICK OPTIONS:

The Dogs enter the draft at pick 13 which means there should still be plenty of talent on the board. They would consider Sandringham Dragons talls, Fischer McAsey and Josh Worrell, the latter of whom should at least be on the board then. Luke Jackson could have teamed up with fellow West Australian Tim English in the ruck over the next decade to be the most exciting ruck partnership but he will most certainly be gone by the time Pick 13 rolls around given Melbourne’s intent to take him. In terms of their smaller options, Cody Weightman might be a consideration, as would Miles Bergman and Kysaiah Pickett, two of whom should be there at Pick 13 – depending on what Melbourne does – or perhaps a bid on Liam Henry if one has not already been placed.

LIVE TRADE OPTIONS:

Potentially they could trade down on draft night if the talls are gone and pick up a couple of players to fill needs. There are a few clubs who might be able to work something out, but Geelong with picks 17 and 24 will probably be the closest to what the Dogs would want, though the Cats are more keen to move further up using pick 14 packaged with 17. Realistically they will stay where they are, take a top talent with 13 and then see what is available at 53, or split that pick for a couple of picks marginally down the order.

REMAINING CROP:

By the time pick 53 rolls around it will be hard for anyone to predict what might be on the board. In terms of talls, Emerson Jeka is a possibility, as is Callum Jamieson, both of whom could be long-term key prospects. They might look at more mature-age talent like Williamstown’s Joel Ottavi or giving former Eagle, Luke Partington a lifeline. If Ned Cahill was still on the board – which is unlikely – the Dogs would pounce, or they might eye of the likes of Jai Jackson or Riley Baldi who can hit the scoreboard and apply pressure to the opposition. If the Bulldogs opt for slightly taller forward options, South Australian duo Callum Park and Josh Morris, Western Jets’ mid/forward Josh Honey and Dandenong Stingrays’ utility Lachlan Williams might be considerations. More mature-age prospects are Sam Lowson and Jake Riccardi for a medium and taller option respectively.

2019 AFL Draft Preview: West Coast Eagles

WEST Coast heads into 2020 as arguably the most balanced list across the competition, with depth across most positions and adding Tim Kelly to a side that was already a premiership contender signals what they might be capable of next year. However everything comes at a cost and grabbing yet another A-grade midfielder has cost them their seat at the draft for the vast majority, placed in the 2019 AFL Draft with picks 46, 91, 108 and 126 – the worst of any club in the competition. The big plus is them not needing a great deal, with only players to replace other ageing talents as the main goal.

CURRENT PICKS: 46, 91, 108, 126.

NEXT GEN ACADEMY/FATHER-SONS – COMBINE INVITES: Nil.

LIST NEEDS:

Overall depth

FIRST PICK OPTIONS:

Coming in at pick 46, it is difficult to determine who might be there by then, and what the Eagles might look at. They might try and add a mature-age prospect to further strengthen their list and bring an immediate player into the fold. Whether that could be a Cole Gerloff or a Frank Anderson to add something in multiple positions, or if they go taller for key utility Joel Ottavi or key forward Jake Riccardi, it is certainly a pick that could go either way. If the Eagles look to youth, the talls available might be Charlie Comben, Callum Jamieson or Nick Bryan who could fill a long-term role as forward-rucks, or going smaller, if Sam Philp is still there they might pounce, or look locally to the likes of Jake Pasini, Riley Garcia, Chad Warner or Trey Ruscoe to fill a need. If high-flying Mitch Georgiades was still on the board, West Coast would have to consider him as a long-term key forward replacement.

LIVE TRADE OPTIONS:

There is not much the Eagles can do other than trade down to try and bridge the gap between their first and second picks. The Eagles could try and swing a deal with next year’s picks but might struggle given their draft placement, and will more likely head to the draft with one or two picks in the third or fourth rounds, which is the downside of being a strong side that has added more class and talent to its list over the off-season.

REMAINING CROP:

As mentioned, the Eagles could well trade down, but if predicting pick 46 was difficult, then 91 or any others the Eagles use are near on impossible. They will just have to assess which players are left by the time their pick rolls around, but be comfortable in knowing the evenness of the draft in the second half means they could get a fourth round value pick in the seventh round. They will have a chance to snap up some players before the rookie draft which is always a bonus, and may well pick up a slider from a player who due to injury or other circumstances might be floating around. Riley Garcia is a local player who while he should be off the board before then, would be one too hard to ignore, while Isaac Wareham is another who could add a long-term need to the team. Ben Sokol is a readymade forward who has been dominant in the WAFL this season, while a sliding injured tall like Jack Bell could potentially fall in their laps. It is difficult to calculate, but the Eagles will at least be able to find some diamonds in the rough despite the late picks.

*Picture credit: Michael Farnell – Sports Imagery Australia

2019 AFL Draft Preview: St Kilda Saints

AFTER a bumper trade period which saw St Kilda bring in a bunch of talent, the Saints are set for a much more subdued draft night. They will open their draft all the way back in Round 3, with just three selections at their disposal but not a massive amount they would be seeking to improve. They have fulfilled a lot of their needs during that trade period and will now likely be a quiet player in the draft, but could deal with a club such as Essendon who has multiple picks in the 60s but will not use them all.

CURRENT PICKS: 51, 82, 100, 118

NOMINATED ACADEMY/FATHER-SONS: Bigoa Nyuon (NGA)

LIST NEEDS:

Long-term ruck depth
Overall depth

FIRST PICK OPTIONS:

Entering the draft all the way back at Pick 51 – which will ultimately become Pick 54 post-bids – is a bizarre position to be in, and is often the approach sides in the premiership window take. But the Saints will back their hand and result of their trade period, with many bases covered and the potential to bring in either project players or readymade mature-agers. They are at the mercy of other clubs’ selections at pick 51, but rucks like Nick Bryan and Callum Jamieson could provide the long-term ruck depth St Kilda looks to be needing as Rowan Marshall matures and Paddy Ryder ages. Flanker types may also interest the Saints as the likes of Jade Gresham, Jack Billings, Hunter Clark and Nick Coffield battle for more midfield minutes, with Brisbane academy product Will Martyn one who could fit the bill along with Louis Butler, Isaac Wareham, Mitch Martin, and Lachlan Williams. Another option might be a versatile tall forward to replace Josh Bruce, such as the dead-eye accurate Cooper Sharman.

LIVE TRADE OPTIONS:

There is not much the Saints have to play with, but they could split pick 51 to give themselves a bit more to work with slightly down the order – such as Essendon with the picks in the 60s. Given they have covered so many bases in the trade period and have immediate cover almost everywhere, it may well be a case of just building that depth.

REMAINING CROP:

Next Generation Academy product Bigoa Nyuon is currently training with the club and could either be taken at pick 82 or in the rookie draft, able to play in each key position post and with good upside as a raw prospect. Mature-agers and real project players come into the fold at the 82-mark, with the Saints lacking any real wriggle room in terms of being able to rely on targeted players still being on the board.

2019 AFL Draft Preview: Hawthorn Hawks

HAWTHORN heads into the 2019 AFL Draft with its highest pick since taking Ryan Burton with pick 19 in 2015, and may well come away with a rare pair of first round selections. The Hawks can look to replenish their key position stocks at the top end, while also looking for points of difference through midfield on top of snaring potential father-son, Finn Maginness.

CURRENT PICKS: 11, 42, 50, 54, 63, 73, 87, 92

NOMINATED ACADEMY/FATHER-SONS: Finn Maginness (F/S), Harrison Pepper (NGA)

LIST NEEDS:

Key position depth
Midfield point of difference/speed

FIRST PICK OPTIONS:

Key position depth, particularly down back, looks like being the Hawks’ priority coming into this year’s draft, with pick 11 a good spot for filling that need at the correct value. All Australian swingman Fischer McAsey looks the best fit and is ripe for the taking at pick 11, but could be snapped up by the Cats should they trade into the top 10. If that is the case, Brodie Kemp is another option with great upside who can plug gaps on every line, while the dynamic Josh Worrell could also slot in up either end as a high marker. The Hawks will hope a bid for father-son gun Maginness comes after their first selection, with a pick somewhere in the teens or early-20s more likely for the athletic midfielder.

LIVE TRADE OPTIONS:

The Hawks have been able to already secure a trade that saw them pick up two selections from North Melbourne in Pick 50 and 73, as well as a future second round selection for the 2020 AFL Draft. In exchange they gave up Pick 30, but with a potential first round bid for Maginness – and certainly top 25 – that selection was always going to be used to secure the father-son, but this way Hawthorn has greater versatility to match.

REMAINING CROP:

As is the case for most sides, the back-end of the draft is purely up to needs and preference as it looms as one of the most open pools in recent times. Should the Hawks look to further bolster key position stocks, the likes of Jake Pasini and Emerson Jeka may well be available around that 54-mark, while ruck options come in the form of Nick Bryan, Callum Jamieson and Joel Ottavi in that range. Angus Hanrahan, brother of current Hawk, Ollie would be a nice addition late-on for some outside run with Isaac Smith coming into the free agency fold soon, while Bendigo pair Flynn Perez and Brady Rowles fit the same mould if they are still on the board, and Josh Honey could offer the same kind of power going forward. Late picks are always difficult to predict, but the Hawks will undoubtedly have their favourites going in and could even take Harrison Pepper as a Next Generation Academy pick.

2019 AFL Draft Preview: Fremantle Dockers

HOLDING one of the strongest draft hands heading into the 2019 AFL Draft, Fremantle is in a terrific position to continue its build up the ladder to try and break back into the top eight. The Dockers were strong players in trade week, bringing in Blake Acres and James Aish, while Ed Langdon and Bradley Hill departed the club, all up leaving six spots open on the club’s list. With two top 10 picks and Pick 22 sure to name three quality stars – one of which will be Liam Henry – the Dockers are primed to add some quality talent back on its list. After a host of retirements and delistings as well as the departures, the Dockers could use the draft to pick up some speed and skill around the ground particularly through the middle. A ruck would not go astray with Aaron Sandilands and Scott Jones both departing, while some extra firepower up forward at the feet of the key position players would also be handy.

CURRENT PICKS: 7, 10, 22, 58, 69, 79, 83

NEXT GEN ACADEMY/FATHER-SONS PROSPECTS – COMBINE INVITES: Liam Henry, Isaiah Butters and Leno Thomas (all NGA)

LIST NEEDS:

Outside midfielder with speed and skills
Small/medium forward
Ruck

FIRST PICK OPTIONS:

It is an interesting scenario for Fremantle coming into the draft at Pick 7. It is expected the Dockers should be safe from having to match a bid on Henry at this selection, so they can pick safe in the knowledge he fills a need by himself when he heads there not too long after the selection. Western Australia (WA) Under-18 Championships winning captain and Larke Medallist Deven Robertson might come into the thinking, possessing the speed required but still being predominantly inside. Dylan Stephens fits a perfect need and would be a perfect choice for the Dockers to team up with Henry over a decade on either wing, while one would think Luke Jackson would at least be a fleeting glance with the speed and skill important, but the lack of ruck options in the draft might see the Dockers grab the WA ruck. With Pick 10 so close, it would be ideal if Fremantle can survive to that pick without a bid on Henry which is certainly possible, just not guaranteed.

LIVE TRADE OPTIONS:

Fremantle is one of the favourites to get down and trade on draft night with the Henry bid certainly a talking point. With Tom Green the only likely player to be taken ahead of Henry in terms of Academy selections, and Finn Maginness not far behind, the Dockers might look to trade down from Pick to be able to match Henry while gaining an extra selection. If they know say Carlton at Pick 9 will bid on Henry, they could look to do a deal with the Blues, or potential leapfrog them and talk to Melbourne at Pick 8. Given the Demons’ next pick is 97, it will need to likely involve a selection from next year coming back the other way with the Dockers not going to give up Pick 22 and 10 for 8, while the Demons will not want to drop two places in the top 10 for the bonus of Pick 58. They could also look to package up 10 and 22 for for a couple of picks in the teens, such as Geelong’s 14 and 17, enabling them to match Henry, while upgrading their third selection.

REMAINING CROP:

After Fremantle has decided what to do with Pick 10, and likely have picked up a couple of top-end prospects as well as the incredibly talented Henry, the Dockers have a couple of selections to play with later in the draft. They might eye off local ruck, Callum Jamieson to fill the ruck void if Jackson was off the board by their selection early, or Charlie Comben or Nick Bryan if they have slipped to their Pick 58. Some outside speed and skill that might be available late is the likes of Ben Johnson, Josh Shute or even Isaac Wareham, while to fill roles up forward, Jai Jackson, Callum Park or Josh Morris might fancy them at those selections. Lachlan Williams is another interesting pick that could land somewhere in the back-end of the draft and he fills roles up both ends. They have some decisions to make, but it will be fascinating to watch them.

2019 AFL Draft Preview: Collingwood Magpies

COLLINGWOOD heads into the 2019 AFL National Draft with a less than inspiring draft hand which means the 2018 Grand Finalists and 2019 Preliminary Finalists will need to get creative with their picks. Luckily for the Magpies, they have been two kicks away from a flag and a second Grand Final, so the strength in the list is there, with just depth needed across the board. They need to address a lack of key position players, with both form and injuries taking a toll, particularly a lack of key position forwards, and perhaps another ruck – though they acquired Darcy Cameron in the off-season. Otherwise some speed and skill around the ground to replace the recently retired or ageing stars most of whom possessed pace with enough elite inside midfielders at the Magpies’ disposal.

CURRENT PICKS: 35, 62, 74

NOMINATED ACADEMY/FATHER-SONS: Nil

LIST NEEDS:

Key position depth – forward first priority
Ruck depth
Fast and skilful half-back or half-forward

FIRST PICK OPTIONS:

At Pick 35, the Magpies will either need to hope there is a slider or perhaps pluck out a surprise player at the selection. West Australian Mitch Georgiades could well slide into that range, which would be a risk given he missed all of his top-age year, but his athleticism and high flying marks would certainly provide the Magpies with something different from a tall. However he is not the traditional key forward height, so if Harrison Jones is available he might be the first choice, while Jake Riccardi might be considered here, though they could hope he slides to their next selection. A couple of left field choices could be Fraser Phillips or Karl Finlay, with the former providing some X-factor and skill inside 50, while the latter provides the rebounding key position depth in defence.

LIVE TRADE OPTIONS:

The Magpies need to do something as they seem to be stuck in the AFL Draft’s version of no-man’s land. They are just beyond the picks likely to secure a key position player they need, and ahead of the next batch which might be 10-20 picks below. This means Collingwood will need to either trade up – perhaps looking at Brisbane’s Pick 21 for a second rounder in 2020 along with their Pick 35, or one of North Melbourne’s Pick 26 or 27 to try and secure one of their key targets. Or perhaps the Magpies will trade down, offering up Pick 35 to perhaps Brisbane again who might want another pick before they need to match their Academy picks, which Picks 48, 52 and 55 are there, or more likely perhaps a Hawthorn with Pick 42 or 54.

REMAINING CROP:

With what the Magpies have left, they could hope Riccardi slides to Pick 62, or perhaps snatch up another available tall such as Charlie Comben, Nick Bryan or Callum Jamieson, or Cooper Sharman if the tall forward is on the board. Dyson Hilder down back could be a consideration if around, or Jake Pasini. If they go smaller, perhaps the Magpies pluck out a school footballer again with a Derek Hine special – picking up a Louis Butler or Kaden Schreiber. One player to keep an eye on is Angus Baker with the Canberra Demons’ half-back a terrific user of the ball and one that the Magpies would be keen to snap up as he fills an immediate role in the side. While their picks are not great, the Magpies can look to mature-agers and plug holes where required.

Scouting notes: WAFL Colts – 2019 Grand Final

THE Claremont Football Club secured its fourth WAFL Colts premiership this decade, and sixteenth overall, defeating Peel Thunder by just five points at Optus Stadium on Sunday.

Lenny Fogliani wrote his opinion-based notes on some of the best players in the game.

PEEL THUNDER

#1 Tyrone Thorne

The younger brother of Peel’s senior player Calvin, Tyrone was exceptional for the Thunder and would have come close to winning the Mel Whinnen Medal had the Thunder won. He finished with a team-high 22 possessions, a game-high eight tackles, recorded three inside 50s, took two marks and kicked a goal in a dazzling display. He never shirked a contest, always fought hard in the stoppages and used his class to set up plenty of attacking opportunities for the Thunder.

#2 Jackson Knight

The Mandurah Football Club product showed why he deserved to finish second in the WAFL Colts Coaches Award with another brilliant performance. He accumulated 19 possessions, took six marks, and recorded three inside 50s as he tried to spark his team to a famous victory,

#8 Zachary Rankin

The Eaton Boomers Junior was excellent off the wing for the Thunder, providing an excellent link between defence and offence. He finished with 16 possessions, six marks, six tackles and five inside 50s in a terrific performance. A highlight of his game came in the third quarter, when he was able to spear a pass onto Isiah Winder who went back and kicked the Thunder’s first goal of the game.

#11 Jarvis Pina

The Peel captain tried his best to set up attacking opportunities from the defensive half for his team, often using his speed and his precise skills to set up team-mates who were further up the field. He finished with 11 possessions, five marks, five tackles, two inside 50s and a goal. The highlight of Pina’s game came in the first quarter, when after he received a 50-metre penalty, he played on due to no-one being on the mark, and drilled through a goal.

#18 Ben Middleton

The 2019 WAFL Colts Leading Goalkicker showed why he is one of the more impressive key forwards in this year’s draft pool. He was strong and powerful in the contest, his leading patterns were excellent and he was accurate in front of goal. He finished with 11 possessions, five marks, four inside 50s and five goals to arguably be his team’s most influential player. In the third quarter alone, Middleton booted three goals from five possessions and three marks. His best goal came in the second quarter when he snapped the ball through the goals from the boundary line, after taking a strong contested mark.

#19 Isiah Winder

The bottom-aged prospect showed why he finished in the top 10 of the Jack Clarke Medal with a sizzling performance. He finished with 10 possessions, four marks, two inside 50s and a goal. The highlight of his game came in the second quarter when he stepped his way around an opponent before he snapped through his second goal.

#21 Jaxon Egan

The Harvey Bulls Junior was excellent for the Thunder, playing as a half-forward flanker. Egan produced a host of scoring opportunities for the Thunder, including one where he produced a bullet-pass onto the chest of Ben Middleton in the third quarter. Egan finished with 12 possessions, six marks, four tackles and a long-range goal.

#27 Jack Sears

Playing off a wing, Sears was excellent as the link-up player between defence and offence. He finished with 15 possessions, six marks, and six inside 50s, often running hard to the right spots to be a bail out kick for his defenders. His class with ball in hand was also crucial in setting up his teammates with scoring opportunities.

CLAREMONT

#3 Leno Thomas

The hero for Claremont, Thomas was the player who produced the goal-saving smother on Jon Ietto which ultimately sealed victory for the Tigers. He accumulated 14 possessions and took four marks, playing as an intercepting and rebounding defender. His precise skills coming out of the defensive half were a real feature of his game, as he was able to set up several attacking opportunities for the Tigers.

#5 Ronin O’Connor

The Claremont captain was a bull in the midfield for the Tigers, often throwing his weight around to win the contested possessions and clearances for his team. He finished with 17 possessions and three inside 50s in a brilliant captain’s performance. His attack on the ball and the man were a real feature of his game.

#12 Joel Western

The bottom-aged Fremantle Next Generation Academy member showed why he is one of the leading prospects from Western Australia for next year’s AFL Draft. He accumulated 23 possessions, and laid six tackles, often using his speed and skill to break Peel’s defensive zones.

#14 Jack Cooley

A deserving winner of the Mel Whinnen Medal, Cooley was simply phenomenal for the Tigers, often powering his way through the contest to get the ball out to his outside midfielders. He finished with 33 possessions (18 of which were contested), won 14 clearances, laid seven tackles, recorded seven inside 50s, and took five marks in a very impressive performance.

#16 Anthony Davis

The Borden product was another hero for the Tigers, being the player who kicked the goal that put the Tigers in front with just minutes remaining. In that passage of play his ability to read the play and intercept Peel’s attempted rebounding 50 was excellent and his finish in front of goal was class. He finished with 15 possessions, four inside 50s and three marks.

#22 Jye Clark

The younger brother of Geelong’s rising star Jordan, Jye was extremely brave through injury. He finished with 15 possessions, four tackles, four inside 50s and a goal. The highlight of his game came in the final term when he gathered the ball out of a pack and bounced it through for a goal, which at the time brought Claremont to within one point.

#25 Callum Jamieson

In a sensational performance, the North Beach Junior showed why he was a deserving recipient of a National Combine invitation. He finished with 12 possessions, 34 hitouts, and four marks to be the best ruckman on the ground. What was really impressive about Jamieson’s performance was when it looked like he went down with a shoulder injury in the last term, he continued to play at a high standard despite being in some discomfort.

#38 Isaiah Butters

The Fremantle Next-Generation Academy member showed why the Dockers rate him so highly with a sublime performance in the Grand Final. He finished with just seven possessions but booted four goals to be the most dangerous forward on the ground for the Tigers. The highlights of his game came in the first quarter – the first one was when he took a sensational pack mark in the twelfth minute of the first term, and the second one was when he cleanly gathered a “chaos” ball after it ripped through several other players before snapping through his second goal.

WAFL Colts weekly wrap: Claremont clinch the 2019 premiership

THIS YEAR was one that WA’s most talented youngsters tasted the ultimate success by winning the 2019 Under-18 National Championships. A number of the players in that squad took to Optus Stadium on Sunday for the biggest day on the WAFL calendar. With talent scouts aplenty watching on, there was a real opportunity for one or more of these youngsters to take one major step towards their AFL dream.

After losing their first game to the Tigers this season, Peel responded to claim their other two encounters with the latest being the second semi-final two weeks ago by 34 points in a grinding affair. It would be interesting to see whether the minor premiers would be lacking a bit of sharpness having played just one game in the last three weeks. In contrast, Claremont were match hardened having had three very solid hit-outs during September. The Tigers were aiming for their 16th Colts Premiership and fourth this decade, while Peel was looking to break a 14-year drought and win the third in their history.

Read below for a re-cap of what was a grand final for the ages.

Claremont 13.4 (82) defeated Peel Thunder 11.11 (77)

He carries the same name as an NBA superstar and just like his namesake, Claremont’s Anthony Davis showed he was not afraid of the big moment by kicking the goal which won his side the 2019 Colts Premiership on a picture perfect day at Optus Stadium on Sunday afternoon.

The Tigers made a enterprising start with a goal to Jack Buller after just a minute of action. Peel then spent the next few minutes looking to find a response but the Tigers were intent on determined defending. The well deserved breakthrough for the favourites eventually came through Isiah Winder from a set shot. The Tigers were in the mood for a right scrap however, and Isaiah Butters took a strong mark and subsequently goaled from 35 metres. The lively forward then made it two in a couple of minutes when he converted an opportunistic snap. The Tigers were officially off to a flyer with Ben Schuhkraft kicking the Tigers’ fourth of the quarter. The swarming pressure of Claremont was a real feature all over the ground, as well as their ability to win the ball from stoppages and perhaps post-bye sluggishness was a factor too. But you never write off a class outfit and Peel did not finish a few games clear of their opposition without being exactly that. Firstly, Jarvis Pina converted form some quick thinking following a 50-metre penalty and then Ben Middleton made the most of a mistake by the Tigers on their last line of defence to cut the margin to two points at quarter time.

Peel claimed their first lead of the game early in the second term which resulted through some hesitant Tiger defence and Winder was able to snap truly from close range. The tide had now turned and it was Peel in the ascendancy. Some quick thinking was again able to catch their opponents off guard with Jaxon Egan converting. You felt Claremont needed the next one to stay within touching distance and stop the surging momentum of the minor premiers. Kade Lines delivered one on the chest to Max Spyvee and he kicked Claremont’s first for the second term. Middleton then responded by kicking his second from a acute angle, but the best forward on the ground in the first half was Butters and he kicked his third for the half through some opportunistic play.

The half-time margin was just four points in favour of Peel and it certainly reflected the state of the game with both teams having their periods of dominance but neither having that momentum to kick right away. Jack Cooley was the lead man when it came to disposals at the long break with 18 along with five inside 50s. Joel Western showed some great dash with 11 disposals while Callum Jamieson was giving his midfielders great service with 19 hit-outs. For Peel it was Tyrone Thorne with 14 disposals and Jackson Knight with 11 and three marks. Key mover Jarvis Pina was quiet with just six disposals for the first half but you would expect him to step up to the mark.

The adage that the third term is the premiership quarter was never more apt in this tight affair and Butters produced the best possible start taking a fine mark running back with the flight to kick his fourth to see the Tigers regain the lead. Buller was then left unattended 30 metres out and duly converted to give the Tigers a mini buffer. It was nip and tuck with mistakes occurring more readily due to some outstanding pressure by both teams. Peel nabbed back the lead in this fantastic ebb and flow contest when Ben Middleton kicked his third. The key forward was shaping as a match winner when he made the most of a pin-point kick from Egan and duly kicked his fourth major for the game. You could really notice the confidence in Peel’s play and there was no greater example than Middleton. He kicked his fifth for the game from right on fifty metres and Peel had their biggest lead of the contest, that being 14 points. The big question was if the Tigers had enough left in the tank to make one last push, or whether the favourites taken the Tigers best shot. What was certain was that the final 25 minutes of the season would be a fascinating one.

The Tigers started on the front foot showing everyone that they had something left in the tank by kicking two quick goals through Schuhkraft and Charlie Malone to cut the margin to two points. Connor Heuer responded for Peel to push the lead beyond a goal but once again the Tigers responded and it was Jye Clark with a quick snap.

It was certainly looking like the Tigers now had the momentum behind them and Malone was stepping up to the mark like good key forwards do. He produced a close range snap which was, the Tigers fourth in the term and gave them back the lead. There was enough time for Peel to hit back and Thorne hit back courtesy of a high free kick. Amazingly, there was another twist and with nerves of steel belying his age, Anthony Davis kicked his first of the game with two and a half minutes left on the clock and suddenly it was the Tigers game to lose. While it was the third lead change in ten minutes, there was still time for some late drama. Peel conjured up a centre break and stormed the ball inside 50. As the clocked ticked inside the 25th minute, you had an inkling there would be a hero in an attacking or defensive sense.

And it came courtesy of the latter with an outstanding piece of play by Tigers defender Leno Thomas in smothering a goalbound kick by Jonathan Ietto in the forward pocket which then ricocheted for a throw-in. It was one of those moments that will go down in club folklore for certain. A few seconds later, the siren went and it was jubilation for the Tigers and absolute devastation for the minor Premiers whose wait for another Colts premiership goes on. It might be scant consolation for the Thunder but once again, the Colts grand final was the best game on the showcase day for WA footy.

In a sign that you don’t need big numbers to have a quality game of footy, the overall disposal numbers were reasonably low (263-240 in Claremont’s favour). Inside 50s were understandably close (43-40 Tigers) but Peel had more scoring shots (22-17). It was also a testament to the closeness of the contest that the margin did not exceed 15 points throughout the four quarters.

Tigers midfielder Jack Cooley was the deserving winner of the Mel Whinnen medal for best player afield with 33 disposals, seven tackles, seven inside 50s and five tackles. Western was not as flashy as normal but displayed another side to his game by distributing by hand with 17 handballs and 23 disposals in total along with six tackles. Butters may have only had seven disposals, but his impact was incredibly telling to the end result with four goals and Malone was magnificent in the last quarter with two goals and had 11 disposals and three marks for the game. For the Thunder, Tyrone Thorne was involved in everything good that Peel produced for the game where he had 22 disposals, eight tackles three inside 50s and two marks. Middleton was absolutely magnificent as a leading target with five goals, five marks and four inside 50s to go with eleven disposals while Zachary Rankin was tenacious with 16 disposals, six marks, six tackles and five inside 50s.

The hard work is not done for a lot of these youngsters with the various draft combines taking place. For those who are selected, the sky will be the limit. And while there will be disappointment for those who miss out, there are plenty of examples of players who go through adversity and come out a lot stronger for the experience.