Tag: angus jeffries

TSL Grand Final preview: Launceston vs. North Launceston

IT is a double-Launceston derby in the Tasmanian State League (TSL) with both Launceston and North Launceston facing off at UTAS Stadium in the seniors and Development League Grand Finals. The senior decider kicks off at 2.30pm following the Development and Women’s Grand Finals earlier in the day.

The reigning premiers North Launceston have a number of young prospects to watch out for across both grades, with Ollie Sanders in great form for the red and black. He has that touch of class and a beautiful left foot which can set up his more experienced teammates inside 50. While he missed out on getting a Draft Combine invite this year, he looms as one who will only get better over the next few years and could benefit as an over-ager next season.

Another North Launceston prospect named in the starting 22 is Baynen Lowe. The Devonport youngster with the fiery red hair is a tackling machine and one not to be messed with when the ball is in his zone. Possessing some nice speed and an ability to corral opponents, the bottom-ager still has another year to go before he is draft eligible. There is not much of the 174cm, 70kg small forward, but he certainly packs a punch.

For Launceston, the only player in the game with an AFL Draft Combine invite is Jared Dakin who has been a Mr Fix It all season. He can play on-ball, up forward or even in defence, where he has been named at half-back. Dakin has been tasked with a number of run-with roles this season and he has nullified key opponents. Interestingly enough, the last time these teams played, Dakin was sent to creative defender Jay Foon and did a good job early before being loosened and seeing Foon get off the chain.

Another top-age talent who has caught the eye as a potential late developer is Isaac Chugg. An elite athlete, he has enjoyed a role change from the wing to half-back where he has been able to show off his run and carry down the ground. Still building a more consistent game, he is one who will only get better with more experience.

One player who has been named as an emergency that is the biggest AFL Draft prospect in the game is Jackson Callow. Seemingly ruled out of contention weeks ago after badly hurting his ankles in an awkward landing, he has been named as an emergency the last couple of weeks. Whilst unlikely to be risked, it does allow the talented key position player to front up for the Development side if he is fit enough to play.

From a more senior perspective, both sides have a number of players in the TSL Team of the Year. North Launceston leads all-comers with a massive six players earning the honour. Ruck Alex Lee and full-back Corey Nankervis have key positions, whilst the left side of the field is all red and black thanks to playing coach Taylor Whitford, dynamic midfielder-forward Brad Cox-Goodyer, and the exciting Foon all named there. On the other wing, Josh Ponting‘s terrific season was rewarded with a starting spot.

For Launceston, competition leading goalkicker Dylan Riley made the forward pocket, with other dangerous forward, Jake Hinds inside 50. Up the other end is Jacob Boyd in a back pocket, whilst Jay Blackberry was named on the interchange. In a prestigious moment for the Blues, they also have the coach and captain of the team, with playing-coach Mitch Thorp leading the side, and Jobi Harper in the centre and named as hypothetical captain. It shows just how much talent is on display in the senior game.

Looking over the Development squads, North Launceston could have a few players to consider over the next couple of years. Top-ager Angus Jefferies impressed at school football this year and is a natural ball-winner. He only stands at a light 177cm and 70kg, but has elite endurance and will run all day. Bottom-age Bombers teammate Ryan Whitney is still building areas of his game, but he has some nice athletic traits to-boot.

Launceston also has a host of would-be Tasmanian Devils players who tested in the preseason for the squad coming into 2020 NAB League Boys season. Three top-agers – Kye Chilcott, Alex Davies and Jayden Hinds – have all been named in the side, whilst the likes of Zach Morris, Sam Foley and Denzel McLean are bottom-agers who will run out for the Blues. They are names to keep an eye on for next year, with Foley impressing in defence for St Patrick’s this year, whilst Morris is a classy forward who always looks lively.

North Launceston head in as favourites in the senior game, whilst Launceston has the depth at the Development level to be the nominal favourites there in what should be a couple of ripping contests.

Picture: Andrew Woodgate

Scouting notes: SATIS Grand Final – Guilford Young vs. St Patricks

IN a come-from-behind victory, Guilford Young won its first Sports Association of Tasmanian Independent Schools (SATIS) in 18 years, defeating regular winners, St Patricks who had claimed seven of the past nine titles. In our scouting notes from the game, we look at some of the Tasmanian Devils prospects who stood out, the majority of whom are bottom-agers and will hope to have an impact in the NAB League or Tasmanian State League (TSL) next year.

GUILFORD YOUNG:

#1 Darcy Gardner

One of the best on the day, Gardner just has a crack every time he is out on the field. You know what to expect from the Clarence youngster and he showed it in the win against St Patricks. Whilst at times he can blast away by foot with his determination to win the ball and get it forward – playing a more contested role – his short kicking is quite neat, and it showed with a lovely lace-out kick to Noah Holmes in the third term, even though Holmes was spoiled on that occasion. He had a chance to score himself with a quick kick, but it went too far to the right and bounce through for a behind. Despite being a smaller player, Gardner has good strength in the contest and is able to shrug off opponents, with not too dissimilar traits to Clarence teammate, Oliver Davis.

Gardner finished with 21 disposals (13 contested), four clearances, six tackles and seven inside 50s.

#3 Oliver Davis

It was interesting to watch Davis around the stoppages as he rarely had too much time and space, often tackled by multiple opponents. As Guilford Young’s captain, it hardly fazed him, firing out handballs from congestion to teammates on the outside and they benefited from his work. You know what to expect from the AFL Academy member, and he did just that. On a number of occasions he was able to hit up teammates inside 50, first to Lachlan Rowlands – who missed – then Lincoln Arnold – who goaled – but his best passage of play was an elite clearance to Holmes leading out in the last 90 seconds of the game to hand his full-forward back-to-back goals in the space of a minute. Occasionally he was done for doing a bit too much, caught close to the boundary line by Michael Stingel in the second term, and then went too high with the tackle on opposing captain Bailey Gillow in the last quarter, but the subsequent shot of the latter sprayed to the right.

Davis worked hard for 16 disposals – at 93 per cent efficiency – of which 10 were contested. He also had five clearances, three inside 50s and two tackles.

#5 George McLeod

Has some nice traits to his game, as well as great versatility. Seemingly the bottom-ager can play in any third of the ground, and his work off half-back and down a wing certainly provides good run for his teammates. He won his fair share of clearances when he went on-ball, and got better as the game went on, showing clean hands time and time again. McLeod was also strong in the air, taking an important intercept mark at half-back in the final term, and remained active, roaming between the arcs.

McLeod finished with 24 disposals, six marks, three clearances, three inside 50s and five rebounds, recording a disposal efficiency of 66 per cent.

#10 Sam Banks

The Tasmanian Most Valuable Player (MVP) at last year’s Under 16s Championships, Banks brought his own ball to the game. While his second quarter was a little quiet, his first, third, and particularly fourth terms were very busy. When the game was on the line, he was continually involved, and his slick handballs or disposals to cut inboard and slice open the defence were handy. He uses the ball well and actually ran at 50 per cent contested rate, sharing his work in close as well as his preferred outside. He had a couple of chances at goal but could not quite register a major, and at one stage did a bit too much at half-forward and was brought down by Khai Lunson. Overall though, the positives stuck out for the major ball winner who had a day out through midfield and benefited from a high work rate across the field.

Banks amassed a game-high 34 disposals (73 per cent efficiency), 17 of which were contested, as well as six marks, six clearances and six inside 50s.

#20 Noah Holmes

The Clarence bottom-ager was the match-winner, coming alive in the second half to slam home five goals. Always looking threatening, something clicked from the fifth minute of the third quarter. In the opening half, Holmes had been okay without being dominant, taking a couple of great marks, but missed three set shots to end the half at 0.3. Two minutes into the second half, Holmes was found trailing his defender in Sam Foley, of whom the latter marked uncontested. From that point on, the key forward would not be beaten again. He kicked his first three minutes later off the back of a strong contested grab 30m out from goal. He tried to assist in a couple of goals to Davis and Banks, but the first pass was one handball too many, and the second was a snap and miss by Banks. Instead, with two minutes left, he clunked a massive contested mark against two opponents on the goalline to go back and pop through his second, and then 30 seconds later, led out and marked off the elite clearance work of Davis. Suddenly his side was in front and he had three consecutive goals. The fourth term started like his third term had ended, with another contested grab six minutes in just 15m out, too big and strong for his opponent. His fifth game 13 minutes into the term against two opponents as he nudged one forward and leant back on the other to take it cleanly and nail the set shot from 20m out.

Holmes finished with 14 touches – nine kicks for 5.3 – as well as eight marks – six contested – in a match-winning performance and clear best on ground.

#21 Sam Collins

Did not see a lot of ball in the opening term because it was up the other end, but showed some good signs with a great tackle to save a charge on goal, then a long kick out of defence. That might have been turned over, but his kicking improved more in the second term, winning the ball more consistently. In the third term, Collins came across with a huge spoil at half-back to cleanly punch the ball out of bounds, backing up from an earlier tackle on the wing that forced a turnover. His intercept mark in the opening 30 seconds of the final term was also a highlight, whilst he finished strongly in the final term, using the ball well out of defence.

Collins finished with 20 disposals at 70 per cent efficiency, but nearly all were uncontested. He showed great determination with four one percenters, as well as six rebounds.

#25 Baker Smith

Much like Holmes up the other end, the tall defender was just too big and strong, and had enough of a leap to read the ball in flight and clunk a number of contested marks. In the opening term alone, he took three intercept marks and it was beginning to look like the opposition was pinpointing him at half-back. He lost his cool in the second term for a front-on tackle on Angus Jeffries, told the umpire that he may have been mistaken in his decision to award the free kick, and then gave away a 50m for his feedback. It was about his only blemish of the day though, as he went back to being a strong interceptor and booming kick, and even had a set shot late in the third term. It was marked on the line by Holmes who finished off the job, but Smith was solid all day in defence.

Smith ended the game with 16 disposals, six marks – four contested – four inside 50s and two rebounds with his 43 per cent disposal efficiency not indicative of his work given most of his kicks were sent long out of the danger zone.

ST PATRICK’S:

#1 Oliver Sanders

Worked hard throughout the game and always looked lively through the middle and forward 50. A kick-first midfielder with 22 kicks and just one handball, Sanders was able to remain busy throughout the game, often out of a stoppage or in the forward half. He had a quick snap late in the second term but just missed to the right, and then a second chance in the final term but his shot just drifted away. While at times he might have rushed his disposals, he worked hard to find space and link up in St Patrick’s transition and finish with the second most touches, and most marks of anyone on his side. He also was instrumental around the clearances and would have some of the higher GPS numbers on the day.

Sanders finished with 23 disposals, eight marks – one contested – six clearances, five inside 50s and four rebounds.

#6 Angus Jeffries

The prominent ball winner on the day and St Patrick’s best, Jeffries put together a four-quarter performance. He won touches from the get-go and was crashing in on the inside, often shovelling handballs out of congestion or clearing it quickly by foot. Despite running at a 50 per cent contested rate, Jeffries still hit most of his targets, and laid plenty of tackles in the process. Not afraid to cop contact, he put his head over the ball in the second term, copped front-on contact from Baker Smith, received a 50m penalty and kicked a goal from point-blank range. He had a set shot from 40m in the final term after being slung to the ground, but it just missed to the left.

Jeffries finished with 24 touches – at 70 per cent efficiency – six marks, seven clearances, six tackles, two inside 50s and one goal.

#11 Sam Foley

Had a tough day at the office in defence, often being the third-up in front of Holmes, or trying to intercept when it came down there. Given Holmes has about 12cm and 14kg on him, the reliable defender was definitely out of his weight class. But he ended the game as one of the best for St Patrick’s, never giving in and proving to be a prominent defender. Finishing with an equal team-high five rebounds, Foley was not afraid to put himself in the hole, or try and come over and assist his teammates.

Foley finished with 12 disposals, four marks, five rebounds and three tackles.

#17 Zachary Morris

Named among the best, the medium forward was solid and lively inside 50. He was slick with ball-in-hand, finishing with a number of contested marks. Despite standing at about 186cm, Morris is able to cleanly take grabs above his head and then hit up targets inside 50. His goal in the game came five minutes into the match with some clever thinking courtesy of a quick snap at the top of the goalsquare. He worked hard throughout the day and remains one to watch for the Devils next year.

Morris claimed 12 disposals – at 75 per cent efficiency – five marks – three contested – two inside 50s and a goal.

Clarence bottom-agers steer Guilford Young to first SATIS title in 18 years

CLARENCE bottom-age talents, Noah Holmes, Sam Banks and Darcy Gardner have dominated the Sports Association of Tasmanian Independent Schools (SATIS) Grand Final, steering their school Guilford Young College to a memorable come-from-behind 22-point victory over St Patrick’s College at Twin Ovals, the college’s first title since 2002.

Whilst St Patrick’s was missing bustling key forward and co-captain Jackson Callow, Guilford Young was also without fellow AFL Draft Combine invitee and Academy member Patrick Walker. It meant the remaining AFL Academy members – Oliver Davis, Sam Collins and Banks – ran out for the winners, while a host of developing talents including Holmes, North Hobart’s George McLeod, and Clarence’s Baker Smith also impressed in the win. For St Patrick’s the players to watch coming into the match were Oliver Sanders and Isaac Hyatt who had both had impressive showings at Tasmanian State League (TSL) level lately.

Despite not possessing the majority of state league talent and missing Callow as a target up forward, it was St Patrick’s that took an early lead into quarter time. Guilford Young owned forward half possession, but missed a few chances and it took until Lincoln Arnold kicked a great goal off the hands of Davis to register the first major of the game. Six minutes later, Declen Chugg put through a running goal and his effort was matched 90 seconds later by captain Bailey Gillow who made no mistake.

The Hobart-based side came out firing early in the second term as Lachlan Rowlands capitalised from the set shot, but it was all St Patricks from there. The green and gold side piled on four of the next five goals, with Chugg kicking a second, while Oliver Chugg, Zach Morris and Angus Jeffries all capitalised with majors. Only ruckman playing the role of rover, Ryan Hapka managed to get one against the momentum, roving Holmes’ marking contest in the square midway through the term to capitalise with quick thinking.

Trailing by 14 points at half-time, Guilford Young needed something special, and that someone was Holmes who booted five of the last six goals of the game. The bottom-age contested marking specialist missed a few chances in the first half, but he was kicking them from everywhere in the second, as he and Arnold (second goal) made the opposition pay. His five goals proved a match winner and he was clearly the best on ground to help Guilford Young to its first SATIS title in 18 years.

Holmes finished with 14 disposals, eight marks – six contested – and 5.3 on the day, with Banks racking up a ridiculous 34 disposals, six marks, six clearances and six inside 50s. Gardner also impressed with 21 touches, four clearances, six tackles and seven inside 50s, while McLeod played a consistent four-quarter game with 24 disposals, six marks – one contested – three clearances, three inside 50s and five rebounds. Smith proved a rock down back with multiple intercept marks (six total, four contested), as well as 16 touches, four inside 50s and two rebounds. Davis worked hard and was often gang-tackled on the inside to finish with 16 disposals, five clearances, three inside 50s and two tackles.

For St Patrick’s, Jeffries was busy with 24 disposals, six marks, seven clearances, two inside 50s and a goal as the losing side’s best, while Sanders helped himself to 23 disposals, eight marks, six clearances, five inside 50s and four rebounds. Sam Foley tried hard in defence often getting in Holmes’ way to pick up 12 disposals, four marks, five rebounds and three tackles. Morris had 12 disposals, five marks – three contested – two inside 50s and a goal for the losers, while Michael Stringel (10 disposals, four inside 50s and three tackles) was also impressive.

GUILFORD YOUNG 1.2 | 3.6 | 6.8 | 9.9 (63)
ST PATRICKS 2.0 | 6.2 | 6.2 | 6.5 (41)

GOALS: 

Guilford Young: N. Holmes 3, L. Arnold, L. Rowlands, R. Hapka.
St Patrick’s: D. Chugg, B. Gillow, A. Jeffries, Z. Morris, O. Chugg, D. Chugg.

ADC BEST:

Guilford Young: N. Holmes, S. Banks, D. Gardner, G. McLeod, B. Smith
St Patrick’s: A. Jeffries, M. Stingel, Z. Morris, S. Foley, O. Sanders

Guilford Young celebrate come-from-behind win over St Patricks in opening SATIS clash

GUILFORD Young College booted six of the last seven goals of the game to come from behind and run over the top of St Patrick’s in the opening game of the SATIS Division 1 season on Wednesday afternoon. A two-goal final term to Tasmania Devils’ Lachlan Borsboom sealed the win for the visiting side who would have headed back down the Midland Highway pleased with an eight-point victory, 7.4 (46) to 6.2 (38).

St Patrick’s had the upper hand early after the game was moved from UTAS to St Patrick’s after the former was inundated with snow from the previous night. It meant Guilford Young had to make the trek up from the southern location to their opponents’ home ground and were on the back foot, but the visitors settled down, kicking the opening goal through big man, David Monks. His long-range set shot was soon countered four and a half minutes later by Angus Jeffries who got St Patrick’s up and about in a low-scoring opening term. Both sides were a goal apiece in wet and windy conditions.

The home team got the jump in the second term and controlled play to boot the only three goals of the second term. After being held well in the opening term – partially due to the terrible conditions for key forwards – Jackson Callow began to get involved, setting up scoring opportunities and even kicking a behind or two himself. Fellow Tasmania Devils talent Oliver Sanders marked inside 50 and handed his team the advantage, which had broken a fair goal drought. Firmly in control, Declan Chugg added his name to the goalkickers list with a major 25m out, with a last minute goal following a turnover from Oliver Davis to Callow who quickly played on and hit up Ben Hyatt one-on-one in the goalsquare. In what would be the last kick of the half, Hyatt turned around and booted it home, for a 4.2 (26) to 1.0 (6) half-time lead.

Callow had worked into the game in that second term, with Sanders and Angus Jeffries looking strong, as was Oliver Chugg. The Guilford Young captain, Davis had been one of the more prominent players in the first half, with AFL Under 16s Most Valuable Player (MVP) Sam Banks, as well as Sanders, Sam Collins and Dom White also busy.

The second half opened with a lightning quick clearance out of the middle from Tony Aganas who was moved into the ruck, roved his own tap and then kicked off the ground forward. A free was paid to St Patrick’s, but the quick give off to Sanders had a fifth goal – and his second – for the home side in the opening minute. From then on though, Guilford Young owned the game. Coach Blair Brownless shuffled around the magnets and got the visiting team moving the ball more aggressively and it started to show on the scoreboard. As the lead had got out to 26 points at one stage, the losing side hit back with three goals, starting with key forward Noah Holmes‘ snap around his body. Darcy Gardiner made it two with a similar attempt midway through the term, and then a silly free kick against the home side for bowling over Banks in midfield gave Davis a 50m penalty and brought him to within range. He duly delivered for his side’s third consecutive goal, and while the home team had a real chance with a few minutes remaining going deep inside 50, Patrick Walker clunked a huge contested grab to save the day.

After a disappointing second half of the third term, St Patrick’s needed an early major in the last to steady the ship, and once again it was Aganas who got the ball moving out of the ruck straight to Zach Morris. He unloaded from 50m with the breeze and all of a sudden the home team was back in control with a 6.2 (38) to 4.1 (25) lead in wet and windy conditions. But, in what was also near-identical to the third term, Guilford Young through everything at St Patrick’s in what would be a memorable final term. Borsboom became the match winner with two final term goals, starting with a quick answer to Monks’ major a few minutes later. Out of nothing the Tasmania Devils’ talent snapped around his body for a goal, and then Ned Ward made it two not long after to level the scores.

With the teams neck-and-neck through the midpoint of the quarter, it looked as though Holmes would be the saviour with a mark not too far out from goal after a strong mark following an end-to-end play. A Banks tackle in the middle had set up the scoring opportunity for the Clarence big man, but he sprayed it to the right. His behind was enough to put his team in front though, and they never surrendered the lead. Marking straight from the kickout, Holmes had another chance, albeit from much further out. It was on target but rushed across the line, but crucially it handed the visitors a two-point lead. Then came the match-winner in Borsboom who won a free kick 15m out on a tight angle after a frustrated Callow gave away a free kick at the top of the defensive 50 for being double-teamed. Borsboom delivered for the second time in the term to hand his side the comfortably lead, and they held on from there.

The turnaround occurred because Guilford Young dared to dream and attacked relentlessly in the second half, as St Patrick’s had chances, but were slower with the ball movement and had tried to stem the momentum against Guilford Young such as throwing Callow behind the ball. Unsurprisingly, Borsboom was one of the winners’ best, with Davis and Banks playing key roles, and Homes providing a target inside 50. Callow worked hard throughout the game, while Sanders was terrific, as was Aganas and Hyatt, but to no avail.

The victory got Guilford Young off to the perfect start in the SATIS Division 1 season, with the second Round 1 game between Hutchins and Scotch Oakburn to take place on Saturday at 1.30pm. St Patricks then home to take full advantage of Scotch Oakburn’s four-day turnaround with a clash back at St Patrick’s next Wednesday, while Guilford Young has an extended break until Saturday, August 15 when it hosts the fifth side in the division – Grammar.