Tag: AFL Womens

Port Melbourne earns VFLW licence for 2021 in revamped Victorian structure

PORT Melbourne will field a Victorian Football League (VFL) Women’s side for the first time next season after the Borough was accepted into the competition following Richmond’s decision to withdraw in 2021. The decision came yesterday with a landmark announcement that VFL Women’s competition will run concurrently with the AFL Women’s competition in February next year. The move allows players from the Victorian AFL Women’s clubs to get match practice under their belts without having to rely on just training sessions when not selected for their club.

South Australia was a trailblazer in that approach, having much success over the past few years allowing Adelaide Crows players to represent their South Australia National Football League (SANFL) Women’s side when not picked to play for the Crows. More recently, Queensland applied a similar approach for the Queensland Australian Football League (QAFL) Women’s competition with the introduction of Gold Coast Suns coming into the top league.

Port Melbourne previously played in the AFL South Eastern Women’s Division 1 competition, but has strong ties through the state league with its rich history of its VFL Men’s side. The Borough will play at ETU Stadium, also known as North Port Oval, and will be aligned with Richmond. It means that the Tigers’ AFL Women’s players will pull on the Port Melbourne colours in the competition in 2020.

Port Melbourne CEO Paul Malcolm said on the Port Melbourne website that the alignment was a fantastic opportunity for both clubs.

“We are looking forward to working together with Richmond to create a pathway for women looking to live out their football dream,” he said. “Our club and our existing partnerships with Bendigo Women’s Football Club, St Michaels Grammar, Oakleigh Chargers, Port Colts, and the Tommy Lahiff Cup will benefit greatly from the alignment and our entry into the VFLW.”

The VFL Women’s competition will run beyond the AFL Women’s season, from February through to July.

The other announcement was that the 2020 NAB League Girls competition would be brought forward slightly to also run concurrently with the VFL Women’s and AFL Women’s competitions. In 2020, the NAB League Girls started on February 29, but that will be brought forward four weeks to allow it to run over the same time as the AFL Women’s competition.

It also means the AFL Women’s Under-18 Championships will be brought forward to April, 2021 from its usual July date. More information about the competitions will be announced in the future.

Picture: Port Melbourne website

2020 AFLW Draft review: Richmond Tigers

NOW the AFL Women’s Draft is over, we take a look at each club, who they picked and what they might offer to their team next year. We continue our countdown with Richmond, a side that struggled in its debut season, going winless and chose to bring in more experience to bolster its stocks in 2021.

Richmond:

#1 – Ellie McKenzie (Northern Knights/Vic Metro)
#43 – Tessa Lavey (WNBL)
#52 – Luka Lesosky-Hay (Geelong Falcons/Richmond VFLW)

Boasting the top selection in the AFL Women’s Draft before a couple of later picks, Richmond had plenty of time to prepare for the draft. They ended up bringing in the standout choice of the 2020 season with Pick 1, before plucking a basketballer out of obscurity, and an over-ager talent who missed out on selection last year.

With Pick 1, there was not much doubt who the Tigers were going to select, picking up Northern Knights’ Ellie McKenzie. The second consecutive Northern Knights’ player at the selection after Gabby Newton last year. McKenzie is a readymade talent who will instantly step up and be one of the better players in the AFL Women’s competition. McKenzie has shades of Madison Prespakis in terms of her preparedness to tackle the league, but is taller and more athletic which makes her such a damaging prospect. She will play from Round 1 and be a crucial cog in the Tigers’ midfield or she can go forward and beat her opponents one-on-one there.

The second pick was completely out of the blue when the Tigers selected WNBL basketballer, Tessa Lavey. The Bendigo Spirit player will miss a portion of the preseason due to the Queensland hub for the WNBL 2020/21 season, but the condensed season has meant she will be fully available for the AFL Women’s one. A national representative, Lavey is raw potential and will be one to watch to see how she performs but no doubt will be fully utilised for her power and athleticism.

Finally the Tigers picked up Luka Lesosky-Hay, an overager who was a member of the premiership-winning Geelong Falcons outfit in 2018 and then again in the finals side last year. She was due to represent Richmond VFL Women’s this year after a stint with Geelong VFL Women’s, but the season was cut short. A hardworking midfielder who can win the ball on the inside then find space on the outside, she earns her chance after missing out last year.

Richmond had the most and least surprising picks of the draft with their first two selections, and have now brought in some athletes with power and strength to help try and turn the Tigers’ team around.

2020 AFLW Draft review: Melbourne Demons

NOW the AFL Women’s Draft is over, we take a look at each club, who they picked and what they might offer to their team next year. We continue our countdown with Melbourne, a team that made finals for the first time in the Demons’ history last season but have looked to rebuild through the draft.

Melbourne:

#5 – Alyssa Bannan (Northern Knights/Vic Metro)
#15 – Eliza McNamara (Sandringham Dragons/Vic Metro)
#17 – Maggie Caris (GWV Rebels/Vic Country)
#35 – Megan Fitzsimon (Gippsland Power/Vic Country)
#41 – Mietta Kendall (Eastern Ranges/Vic Metro)
#48 – Isabella Simmons (GWV Rebels/Vic Country)

Melbourne’s draft hand was perhaps the most unique of the lost, with no two players the same in terms of their role or style. In some cases there might be some cross-overs in roles or styles, but the uniqueness of the haul makes the Demons a real unique group that can fill some important holes around the field.

Picking up Alyssa Bannan at Pick 5, the Demons get a readymade key forward who can also roam through the midfield. Expect her to start deep and cause all sorts of issues for defenders with her athleticism, overhead marking and goal sense. While many tall forwards are out of the contest after the marking contest, Bannan can also play the role of small forward and create something out of nothing from ground level.

Eliza McNamara is a hard-nut through the middle who can play in multiple positions. Traditionally the pocket rocket is an inside midfielder, but spent time on the outside and even up forward at times to increase her versatility. Possessing terrific athletic capabilities and a fierce attack on the ball, McNamara will be a player Dees fans can’t help but like.

Another midfielder brought into the club is Gippsland Power’s Megan Fitzsimon. The balanced midfielder can also play at half-back or half-forward, but has that elite burst and is able to use the ball well going inside 50. She is so balanced and can win the footy and distribute it by hand or foot out of a stoppage and is taller than McNamara. Clean and precise is a way to describe Fitzsimon.

Also likely to front up onball is Maggie Caris, although the 189cm-odd talent will be tapping it down to her teammates. The standout ruck in the AFL Women’s Draft class, Caris is good around the stoppages with clean hands and a strong work rate. She is developing some areas of her game coming from an elite netball background – that she still competes in – but has some unique traits thanks to her size and skillset.

Caris’ junior teammate in Isabella Simmons is not much smaller at 184cm, but instead she is predominantly a half-forward who can push up onto a wing. She might seem like a key position forward at that size, but her mobility and desire to run in transition makes her a perfect role for further up the ground. She is someone who has one of the highest upsides in the draft with very few players of her height able to move the way she does.

Finally, Eastern Ranges’ Mietta Kendall joined the club with the reliable defender having a consistent 2019 and a really strong start to 2020. She loves the contested one-on-ones, able to win the ball in close and distribute out, and can play an anchor role in defence, or even a shutdown role if required. A no-frills player, Kendall is one who you can guarantee will play her role each and every week.

Melbourne fans should be excited by the players the club has brought in, filling quite a number of holes across the field and setting up the red and blue for the future.

2020 AFLW Draft review: GWS GIANTS

NOW the AFL Women’s Draft is over, we take a look at each club, who they picked and what they might offer to their team next year. We continue our countdown with GWS GIANTS, a team that showed great potential in 2020, and was able to add a couple of terrific junior talents and a train-on player from the season.

GWS GIANTS:

#9 – Tarni Evans (Queanbeyan Tigers/Eastern Allies)
#29 – Emily Pease (Belconnen Magpies/Eastern Allies)
#42 – Libby Graham (Manly Warringah Wolves)

Having just the three selections in the AFL Women’s Draft, the GIANTS were able to handpick their choices by having a monopoly on the New South Wales group. They picked a couple of highly-rated teenagers out of AFL Canberra in Tarni Evans and Emily Pease, as well as the experienced Libby Graham who was a train-on player for the GIANTS in 2020, coming out of Manly Warringah Wolves.

First selection Evans comes out of Queanbeyan Tigers and is a member of the AFL Women’s Academy. A taller forward who can roll through the midfield, Evans moved from Tathra to the nation’s capital in order to test herself in a stronger league. She did just that and she could see plenty of footy in 2021. Likely to start forward and then develop into a genuine utility across the field, she will be a clever forward option for the GIANTS to kick to.

Joining her was fellow AFL Women’s Academy member and AFL Canberra representative, Emily Pease. Both Pease and Evans are former athletic talents, and whilst Pease is a little smaller, she can play through midfielder or off half-back. She is able to provide that run and drive out of the defensive 50 and add a bit of spark to the GIANTS starting side, and will no doubt push for a spot over the summer.

The final selection of Graham was one that rewarded her for her commitment during the 2020 season as a train-on partner and then stepped up for the Wolves in the AFL Sydney Women’s competition. She also plays off half-back, with a bit of added experience as a readymade defender who can step up straight away and slot into the outfit.

The GIANTS had a relatively quiet off-season, but also brought in Katherine Smith from the Demons, so have bolstered their defensive stocks, as well as adding some young class to the line-up in what could be a big 2021.

Picture: GWS GIANTS

2020 AFLW Draft review: Gold Coast Suns

NOW the AFL Women’s Draft is over, we take a look at each club, who they picked and what they might offer to their team next year. We continue our countdown with Gold Coast, a side that added the most draftees of any team, with a mix of youth and experience coming into the program for 2021 after reaching finals in their inaugural year.

Gold Coast:

#7 – Annise Bradfield (Southport/Queensland)
#23 – Sarah Perkins (Hawthorn VFLW)
#50 – Maddison Levi (Bond University/Queensland)
#54 – Janet Baird (Palmerston Magpies)
#57 – Lucy Single (Bond University)
#58 – Elizabeth Keaney (Southern Saints VFLW)
#60 – Daisy D’Arcy (Hermit Park/Queensland)
#61 – Wallis Randell (Bond University)

The Suns were able to make the most of a giant draft hall by picking up three AFL Women’s Academy members, a couple of mature-agers and even a forward with AFL Women’s experience by the time they had finished on draft night.

Annise Bradfield ended up being the Suns’ first selection with the talented midfielder one of the three AFL Women’s Academy members. Bradfield is capable of also playing forward and looks up to Katie Brennan as a similar player through both roles and their journeys – featuring setbacks. She will be one who can slot straight in if required.

Another player who can slot straight in is former Adelaide and Melbourne AFL Women’s forward, Sarah Perkins. Playing in her third state in as many years, Perkins nominated for Queensland and landed at the Suns’ with their second selection. She could provide that extra spark inside 50 and energy around a group of younger players, not to mention a key forward target.

Also inside 50, expect to see top-age AFL Women’s Academy key forward Maddison Levi alongside Perkins. With strong hands and a powerful kick, she represents a bargain at Pick 50, in the first of six selections by the Suns that were uninterrupted by their Queensland rivals, Brisbane.

Up the other end, is former Southern Saints defender Elizabeth Keaney. The 28-year-old will play off half-back and provide some drive for the Suns, while providing crucial experience from her time at the Saints and Melbourne University over the past few years.

A midfielder who has been known to role through defence, teenager Lucy Single hails from New Zealand having tried a number of sports including rugby sevens. An elite athlete, Single is readymade to come into the line-up after a huge season with Bond University in 2020.

The third and final AFL Women’s Academy member selected by the Suns is elite runner, Daisy D’Arcy. Capable of reaching the elite level in any sport she put her mind to, the midfielder can play in attack or defence as well. Whilst small in stature, D’Arcy could outrun and outwork just about any opponent with her ridiculous fitness base.

Janet Baird is a mature-age prospect who has been in draft calculations for a few years, but after some consistent form in the NTFL Women’s competition, has earned a place on the Suns’ list. She has clean hands at ground level or in the air, and some tricks up her sleeve making her a tricky player to contain whether it be through midfield, attack or defence.

Finally the eighth selection in the draft was Mackay’s Wallis Randell who has come through the Suns’ Academy. Another defender possessing great speed and neat decision making, Randell has transitioned from basketball to football. An over-ager who represented Bond University, she has come on quickly in a couple of years.

Overall the Suns picked up a bit of everything and will have even better depth coming into the 2021 AFL Women’s season.

Picture: Tertius Pickard/Gold Coast Bulletin

2020 AFLW Draft review: Fremantle Dockers

NOW the AFL Women’s Draft is over, we take a look at each club, who they picked and what they might offer to their team next year. We continue our countdown with Fremantle, a team that went undefeated in 2020 and were able to add a couple of classy teenagers and a former Docker back on their list.

Fremantle:

#14 – Sarah Verrier (Peel Thunder/Western Australia)
#30 – Mikayla Morrison (Swan Districts/Western Australia)
#46 – Tiah Haynes (Subiaco)

Fremantle went into the draft with the luxury of being able to pick best available after not losing a game in 2020. With their three selections the Dockers were able to add two of the most talented kids in Sarah Verrier and Mikayla Morrison, as well as running defender, Tiah Haynes. All three have different traits and provide some exciting capabilities at the top level.

Haynes is a former Fremantle player, drafted way back in the inaugural 2016 AFL Women’s Draft with Pick 36. She played six games across two seasons before being unfortunately delisted at the end of 2018. She went back to the WAFL Women’s competition where she was able to ply her trade and become a standout for runners-up Subiaco, and now the 27-year-old gets a second crack at the elite level.

Verrier has been long touted as a top West Australian prospect. The balanced midfielder has clean skills but can play inside or outside, and even off a flank if required. Her ability to win the ball is superb, and whilst she had some setbacks through injury in 2020, she was still a key member of Peel Thunder in their remarkable premiership year. She was raised as the Dockers’ first pick for some time given the link through their Academy, and once she was left on the table by the Eagles, it was an easy choice.

Morrison has been building for a couple of years now not only at WAFL Women’s level, but through the AFL Women’s Under-18 Championships too. The East Perth product went to Swan Districts this season in order to play League with the Royals just having an Under 18s side. There she showed enough to suggest it will not be long before she breaks through in the AFL Women’s, with velcro-like hands at ground level or in the air, and hardly impacted on wet days.

As a whole, the Dockers were able to bring in three players that fitness providing, will push for a spot in the best side, but as a tough team to crack into, they will be made to work for it. Expect the Dockers to again challenge for a flag in 2021.

Picture: Fremantle FC

South Australian draftees double as AFL Women’s lists are finalised

FOUR more South Australians made their way onto AFL Women’s lists over the last 48 hours to round out the last of the players to enter the competition for 2021. Norwood’s Bella Smith, South Adelaide’s Tahlia Meyer and North Adelaide duo, Amber Ward and Lauren Gauci were all offered AFL Women’s contracts as part of the post-draft selections.

Smith was the first to be announced as an additional signing following the four passes from the AFL Women’s Draft, chosen to reunite with former Redlegs coach, Steve Symonds at Collingwood. Earlier yesterday, Meyer filled the vacant spot at St Kilda, whilst both Ward and Gauci prepared to head west as they were signed by West Coast.

The quartet followed on from Teah Charlton, Rachelle Martin and Ashleigh Woodland (Adelaide) and Indy Tahau (Brisbane) who were drafted on Tuesday night. It meant eight South Australians were drafted, with grand finalists, North Adelaide and South Adelaide making up three apiece, with one each from the other finalists, West Adelaide and Norwood.

Smith is a reliable key position player who can fill a role at either end, though has predominantly played as a centre half-back this season. Her strength overhead and ability to clunk grabs has been a highlight for her, playing in her second season at the level after coming through the AFL Women’s Under-18 Championships where she represented the Central Allies.

Meyer was one of the most underrated players in the SANFL Women’s competition with her ability to link up in transition superb. She did not always win as much of the footy as others, but rarely wasted it, with her ability to hit those 45-degree kicks going inside 50. Her skill and decision making was superb and she has very much earned a place at the top level.

Ward is a tall defender who like Smith, was strong in the air and has a great ability to rebound. After an impressive top-age year last year, the North Adelaide defender took her game to another level in 2020, and along with her intercepting ability was able to utilise her penetrating kick to advantage. Still a teenager, Ward is only one year out of the draft class and showed the benefits of playing an extra year at senior level.

Gauci has become another reliable defender for the Roosters, with her slick footskills often used coming out of defence. She has proven to be a talented ball winner and one that teammates are happy to get the ball in the hands of. A member of the stringent Roosters’ back six, Gauci is also capable of playing up the field, and will provide some reliability with ball-in-hand.

Overall the four inclusions to the AFL Women’s provide their respective clubs with readymade players and will no doubt do everything to stake their case for a Round 1 spot. Furthermore it shows the talent on show in the SANFL Women’s and why it is such a prestigious competition.

Picture: West Coast Eagles Twitter

2020 AFLW Draft review: Carlton Blues

NOW that the 2020 AFL Women’s Draft is over, we take a look at each club, who they picked, and what each player might offer to their team next year. We continue our countdown with Carlton, a side which had few glaring weaknesses to cover, but selected a versatile trio of Vic Metro-based midfielders, two of whom are former NAB League captains.

Carlton:

#12 – Mimi Hill (Oakleigh Chargers/Vic Metro)
#28 – Daisy Walker (Sandringham Dragons/Vic Metro)
#36 – Winnie Laing (Sandringham Dragons/Vic Metro)

A club moving into its premiership window, Carlton chose to stick with Victorian youth to bolster its squad heading into season 2021. Positioned well with their three picks, the Blues selected players with the character and upside to make an impact on the senior side as soon as in their debut season. Having held picks two and three in the last couple of drafts, the Blues were able to select ‘best available’ talent from the rich Victorian pool.

First up was Mimi Hill, a two-time Oakleigh Chargers captain who has led the fast-improving region to with aplomb. She, along with Sandringham Dragons skipper Winnie Laing, directly address the loss of Sarah Hosking to Richmond during the sign and trade period. Hill’s ground level game and hard-running style, combined with Laing’s attack on both ball and carrier make for a terrific couple of selections at picks 12 and 36 respectively.

While pegged as a natural midfielder who can play both inside and out, Hill is still quite light-on and found herself more often employed across half-back as a top-ager. As she develops her strength and tackling, she could well rotate through the midfield and emulate her idol, Sam Mitchell. Laing is a tough midfielder who, fittingly enough, idolises Patrick Cripps. As another leader in the bunch, she will look to drive standards and contribute to the culture, while impacting physically on-field.

In between those selections, Daisy Walker was snapped up with pick 28. She also hails from the Sandringham Dragons talent program, and is more of a developing type who comes from a basketball background. Her love of football grew as she watched her older brother, Will rise to AFL Draft selection with North Melbourne. Her agility and endurance make for a good athletic platform to develop upon, with clean hands and improving fundamentals making her a high-upside choice who could come on rapidly in an elite environment.

Overall, the Blues have been able to bolster their already-strong midfield group with three shrewd selections at this year’s table. Coach Daniel Harford obviously sought to bring in a balance of hardened types with plenty of upside who can develop on the outer or flanks before filling the engine room in years to come. Character is another important trend in this cohort, with two junior captains selected to help keep Carlton’s premiership tilt on track.

2020 AFLW Draft review: Adelaide Crows

NOW the AFL Women’s Draft is over, we take a look at each club, who they picked and what they might offer to their team next year. We begin the countdown with Adelaide Crows, one of two teams with a monopoly on their chosen state.

Adelaide:

#4 – Teah Charlton (South Adelaide/Central Allies)
#45 – Rachelle Martin (West Adelaide)
#47 – Ashleigh Woodland (North Adelaide)

The Crows rewarded great form in the South Australian National Football League (SANFL) Women’s competition by picking up equal league best and fairest winner, Rachelle Martin and leading goalkicker, Ashleigh Woodland. The experienced pair have both tasted AFL Women’s football before, with Martin being a train-on partner for the Crows who managed to play due to the 2020 injury crisis, whilst Woodland was on Melbourne’s list in 2019.

The pair join the clear standout South Australian prospect in Teah Charlton who was no surprise to join the tri-colours in the draft, coming off a few great years with South Adelaide in the SANFL Women’s and South Australia and Central Allies at the Under-18 Championships. All three players could play from Round 1 if required, and with the Crows having a number of injured players returning, they should be flag favourites.

Adelaide’s depth is unbelievable, and what makes these three selections so great is the fact that they can slot in across multiple positions. One would expect Charlton to play forward and then push up the ground to impact through the middle, but her clean hands and ability to hit the scoreboard is a feature of her game. The teenager oozes X-factor and you can just see her adding an extra element to an already stacked forward line.

Martin is predominantly an inside bull, which is where she does her best work and expect her to play, but she can also play inside 50 and be that pressure forward to add to the class around her. Her second and third efforts are as good as anyone’s, and she is a fierce tackler who is not afraid to bring down opponents. Expect her to work well with fellow SANFL Women’s league best and fairest winner Anne Hatchard in midfield, as well as Ebony Marinoff as another big tackler.

Woodland is one who will easily step up at AFL Women’s level and has that experience from training in an elite environment at the Dees, and coming back to state league level and dominating, she is ready to cement herself in the best side. She will likely play forward as a leading target, but depending on how the Crows utilise Eloise Jones, Woodland could also play off half-back – as she did through the South Australian All-Stars game – or through the middle as a natural ball winner.

There was never any doubt that Adelaide would emerge as big winners from the draft, but the Crows have added three players who can immediately step up and play a role in the best side for prolonged periods of time, with Charlton a star of the future.

2020 AFLW Draft review: Club-by-club picks

THE dust has settled on the exciting 2020 AFL Women’s Draft. Over the next week we will be delving into each club’s selections and detailing more information about those players who earned places at the elite level. Below we have listed each club’s selections from last night’s draft if you are waking up to check out who your newest stars are.

Adelaide:

#4 – Teah Charlton (South Adelaide/Central Allies)
#45 – Rachelle Martin (West Adelaide)
#47 – Ashleigh Woodland (North Adelaide)

Brisbane:

#8 – Zimmorlei Farquharson (Yeronga South Brisbane/Queensland)
#37 – Indy Tahau (South Adelaide/Central Allies)
#38 – Ruby Svarc (Essendon VFLW)

Carlton:

#12 – Mimi Hill (Oakleigh Chargers/Vic Metro)
#28 – Daisy Walker (Sandringham Dragons/Vic Metro)
#36 – Winnie Laing (Sandringham Dragons/Vic Metro)

Collingwood:

#19 – Tarni Brown (Eastern Ranges/Vic Metro)
#25 – Amelia Velardo (Western Jets/Vic Metro)
#26 – Joanna Lin (Oakleigh Chargers/Vic Metro)
#31 – Abbi Moloney (Sandringham Dragons/Vic Metro)
#33 – Pass

Fremantle:

#14 – Sarah Verrier (Peel Thunder/Western Australia)
#30 – Mikayla Morrison (Swan Districts/Western Australia)
#46 – Tiah Haynes (Subiaco)

Geelong:

#10 – Darcy Moloney (Geelong Falcons/Vic Country)
#20 – Laura Gardiner (Geelong Falcons/Vic Country)
#21 – Olivia Barber (Murray Bushrangers/Vic Country)
#27 – Stephanie Williams (Geelong Falcons/Darwin Buffettes)
#39 – Carly Remmos (Geelong Falcons/Vic Country)

Gold Coast:

#7 – Annise Bradfield (Southport/Queensland)
#23 – Sarah Perkins (Hawthorn VFLW)
#50 – Maddison Levi (Bond University/Queensland)
#54 – Janet Baird (Palmerston Magpies)
#57 – Lucy Single (Bond University)
#58 – Elizabeth Keaney (Southern Saints VFLW)
#60 – Daisy D’Arcy (Hermit Park/Queensland)
#61 – Wallis Randell (Bond University)

GWS GIANTS:

#9 – Tarni Evans (Queanbeyan Tigers/ACT)
#29 – Emily Pease (Belconnen Magpies/Eastern Allies)
#42 – Libby Graham (Manly Warringah Wolves)

Melbourne:

#5 – Alyssa Bannan (Northern Knights/Vic Metro)
#15 – Eliza McNamara (Sandringham Dragons/Vic Metro)
#17 – Maggie Caris (GWV Rebels/Vic Country)
#35 – Megan Fitzsimon (Gippsland Power/Vic Country)
#41 – Mietta Kendall (Eastern Ranges/Vic Metro)
#48 – Isabella Simmons (GWV Rebels/Vic Country)

North Melbourne:

#13 – Bella Eddey (Sandringham Dragons/Vic Metro)
#22 – Alice O’Loughlin (Oakleigh Chargers/Vic Metro)
#44 – Georgia Hammond (Darebin Falcons VFLW)
#49 – Brooke Brown (Launceston)
#55 – Amy Smith (Aberfeldie)

Richmond:

#1 – Ellie McKenzie (Northern Knights/Vic Metro)
#43 – Tessa Lavey (WNBL)
#52 – Luka Lesosky-Hay (Geelong Falcons/Richmond VFLW)

St Kilda:

#6 – Tyanna Smith (Dandenong Stingrays/Vic Country)
#24 – Alice Burke (Sandringham Dragons/Vic Metro)
#34 – Renee Saulitis (GWV Rebels/Vic Country)
#40 – Jacqueline Vogt (Southern Saints VFLW)
#51 – Pass

West Coast:

#3 – Bella Lewis (Claremont/Western Australia)
#18 – Shanae Davison (Swan Districts/WA)
#32 – Julie-Anne Norrish (East Fremantle)
#53 – Andrea Gilmore (Claremont)
#56 – Pass
#59 – Pass

Western Bulldogs:

#2 – Jess Fitzgerald (Northern Knights/Vic Metro)
#11 – Sarah Hartwig (Sandringham Dragons/Vic Metro)
#16 – Isabelle Pritchard (Western Jets/Vic Metro)