Category: Womens

NTFL Women’s preview: Round 3 – Bottom two face off for first victory

ROUND 3 of Northern Territory Football League Women’s (NTFLW) is coming up this weekend, with a number of big matches set to make or break sides even at this early stage of the season.

Waratah v. Nightcliff
Round 3 – 19/10/19
11:00
TIO Oval 2

The opening match of Round 3 will be an interesting one, with Waratah and Nightcliff completely swapping positions on the table in comparison to their respective 2018/19 season form. While Waratah only lost two matches last season and sit on one win from two matches this season, Nightcliff have already equalled their 2018/19 season wins with two. This match will really see whether Nightcliff have had the improvement they look to have had or whether they have come out with the luck of the draw in the opening rounds. Nightcliff have a smattering of high-impact players, with Shantel Miskin-Ripia the leading goalkicker for the side so far while Kate Morris has also been pivotal to the side’s early victories. for Waratah, Lisa Roberts and Madeline Gault have impressed early despite the side’s form.

Southern Districts v. Pint
Round 3 – 19/10/19
2:00
Norbuilt Oval

This will be a big match, with the two sides only separated by percentage at this early stage of the season but sitting with three other sides in between them. Pint have had a solid start to the season, only going down by two points in the opening round before rendering their opposition scoreless in Round 2, meaning Southern Districts could be in for a tough one despite beating last year’s premiers in Round 1, with a scoreless performance against the Wanderers last week potentially a big thorn in their side. For Pint, expect another solid performance from Jessie Baumer and Erin Hetherington while Crocs’ Charles Deegan, Lateesha Jeffrey and Mattea Breed are sure to speed head-first into the contest.

Palmerston Magpies v. Darwin Buffettes
Round 3 – 19/10/19
3:00
TIO Oval 2

The Magpies have a huge task ahead of them this round, taking on the thus far undefeated Buffettes – who have only conceded one behind for the season so far and are sitting pretty at the top of the ladder. Palmerston are in sixth from two rounds, going down last round to the reigning premiers but proving they have the ability to hold out for a win after a two point victory in Round 1, piling on the defensive pressure. If the Magpies can draw on that pressure again this week and hold off the Buffettes’ plethora of forward options, they could have a real chance of stopping Darwin in their tracks. That being said, the Buffettes have confidence and consistency on their side, making this an interesting contest especially with the likes of Tikesa Docherty-Cole and Machaelia Roberts impressive targets forward with plenty of grunt to get the job done. For Palmerston, expect another solid performance from Natasha Medbury while Arthurina Moreen has plenty to offer.

Wanderers v. St Mary’s
Round 3 – 19/10/19
5:00
TIO Oval 2

Wanderers have had a varied start to the season, unable to put a goal on the board in the opening round before unleashing in Round 2 with a 60-point victory against last year’s grand finalists, Southern Districts. Meanwhile, St Mary’s have had a similar few weeks, dominating against the league’s newest side in Round 1 but defeated by last season’s wooden spooners last week. Aaliyah Bailey is one who has burst onto the scene with St Mary’s, aided up forward by Danielle Ponter creating a real exciting young duo. For Wanderers, Sophia Mauboy put in a solid performance last week while Chonntel Vea Vea can have a real impact with ball in hand.

Tracy Village v. Big River Hawks
Round 3 – 20/10/19
2:30
Tracy Village

In a battle between early strugglers, this match will be very telling of which team could make their way up the ladder after a slow start and which side will continue to be a cellar dweller. While both sides have plenty to bring to the table, neither have really had an opportunity to prove themselves yet so will be raring to go. This will be the real test for both sides as they look to improve on their respective early season struggles, especially as both sides went completely scoreless in Round 2. For the Razorbacks, look to Alexandra Biggs, Grabrielle Young and Tara Everett after stellar performances to start the season while Jayde De La Coeur and Keomi Ross made an impact on the scoreboard in Round 1 for the Hawks, marking themselves as solid options inside 50.

Barba tackles any challenge thrown her way

DEFENSIVE pressure has been the barometer that Calder Cannons’ Alana Barba sets every week, with the ferocious midfielder striking fear into the hearts of opposition players when they have the ball in her area. The tenacious talent from Roxburgh Park averaged 7.1 tackles per game for the Cannons in the NAB League Girls competition, and considering what her improvement was at the start of the season, it is a remarkable feat.

“Just getting to every single contest (is an improvement I want to make),” Barba said at the NAB League Fitness Testing Day in the pre-season. “I’ve had a hard time doing that so I just want to improve on that, that’s my main focus.”

For Barba, she has always been involved in and around the code, having risen through the pathways to land at the Cannons, and admitted it was quite an eye-opener compared to local football with the elite pathway getting the recognition it deserved.

“I’ve been playing since I was little, but only came to Calder Cannons three years ago and from there, it’s just built up,” Barba said. “It’s (playing with Calder) a great experience. “It’s a new experience, it’s at a higher standard so you really have to push yourself to get in line with all the girls as well.”

Like many AFL Women’s Draft hopefuls, Barba said it was the social element that kept her in the sport, while she was always determined for her and which club she played for, to continue to improve throughout the season.

“I think just the connection we have with all the girls is just, our friendship is something out of this world, that’s the best part about it,” Barba said. “I think just to be successful and to develop as a whole.”

Along with her tackling feast in the NAB League Girls, Barba earned a place in Vic Metro’s squad for the AFL Women’s Under-18 Championships, where she averaged 3.3 tackles from 6.7 disposals. Then, if anyone questioned whether she could apply the same defensive pressure against senior bodies for Essendon’s Victorian Football League Women’s (VFLW) side, then she answered that emphatically. In three games for the club, Barba laid 4.3 tackles per game from 6.8 disposals, making her total across all three competitions and impressive 5.8 tackles from 10.1 disposals.

Now Barba is ready for the next step-up with her focus set on the AFL Women’s, which could become a reality at next week’s AFL Women’s Draft.

Newcomer Viney grows in short space of time

EIGHTEEN months ago, Rebecca Viney was running around for North Beach Football Club in Western Australia. While the Tigers are considered Western Australia’s most successful amateur team, it was a far cry from the AFL Women’s competition which at that stage was in its second season. It is hard to believe just two years later, Viney could be running around in just that – the elite level competition – after producing a remarkable rise to represent her state at the Under-18 Championships.

“I started footy last year in an amateur league,” Viney said. “So I played for North Beach Football Club and I just did it because I wanted to have a go at footy and I really enjoyed it and had a lot of fun and I managed to at the end of the season win the best player of the whole comp which was really surprising, but that’s what lead me on to go further and take the State Academy and come here.”

Viney said she loves running around with her teammates and experiencing the camaraderie that comes with Australian rules football. While she has the ultimate goal of getting drafted, she is not getting too far ahead of herself given her limited experience in the code.

“I’d love to go as far as AFLW but right now I just want to keep improving my skills and getting the best out of what I can,” she said. “My strengths are mainly are on the ground picking up ball and using my speed. “I want to keep improving my skills, my handballs, getting that efficiency.”

Viney said she was lucky in the sense she did not have as much travelling to do as some of her West Australian teammates, hailing from the city. But when she did cross the country for the Under-18 Championships, she loved it.

“(It’s a) whole new experience and I’m loving it,” Viney said. “Especially being exposed to the Victorian girls and their game and see how we compare to them. “I just want to keep improving my game like I said and each game keep improving on what I’m doing and learning from the coaches and implementing that in a game.”

As for an inspiration to follow, she has looked at her local West Australian Women’s Football Leagu club, Subiaco.

“Personally I think I look up to some of the AFLW girls,” Viney said. “At the moment playing at Subi, there’s Dana Hooker down there sometimes and she’s a really good player and I love watching her and it’s really cool.”

Theodore hoping to emulate Prespakis’ journey to AFLW

CALDER Cannons product, Felicity Theodore proved to be a lynchpin in defence using her nimbleness and speed to evade players and burst away from the pack time and time again. Signed with Essendon VFLW, Theodore aspires to follow the same path of those before her in particular, NAB Rising Star Maddy Prespakis who introduced her to the sport.

“I got into footy through Maddy Prespakis who plays for Carlton. She actually pulled me over one training session and was like ‘come to training’ so that’s how I started,” she said.

Prespakis had a continued influence on Theodore, captaining her last season and leading from the front both on the footy field and off the park.

“I hope to follow Maddy’s footsteps and get drafted but I’m just at the moment hoping to have a really good season and enjoy myself,” she said.

The Rising Star proved to be an inspiration for Theodore who credited her effort on the field and sheer class while also highlighting her importance at the Cannons throughout their time together.

“It was amazing, every game she just gave 120 per cent and it was so inspiring to see,” she said.

The nippy defender worked tirelessly throughout the year securing a spot in the National Championships with Vic Metro credit to her gut running, versatility and ability to break lines and while she has a spot with Essendon’s VFLW side is aware of elements she must improve.

“Definitely my quick kicks so like just getting kicks and really trying to hit up a target,” she said.

She relished the new opportunities throughout the 2019 season, taking the younger players under her wing and capitalising on her chances to impact across the ground.

“I’m just looking forward to this season as a whole and being able to play with my teammates, the coaching staff that are amazing and just to improve my game,” she said at the NAB League Fitness Testing Day earlier this year.

Theodore’s move from the attacking 50 to defence paid dividends with the talented small making the Vic Metro side. In the NAB League Girls competition, Theodore averaged 8.3 disposals, 2.0 tackles and more than a rebound per game, but it is her speed and dare to create options up the field that set her apart. She played a similar role for Vic Metro, running hard for almost identical statistics, and holding her own against the nation’s most talented players.

Then returning to Victoria, Theodore tasted Victorian Football League Women’s (VFLW) experience with Essendon, where she averaged 8.3 disposals and 3.3 tackles, not afraid to throw herself into the contest against stronger bodies. Now with some good form behind her throughout the season across three different levels, Theodore is hoping to join Prespakis in the AFL Women’s.

Late bloomer O’Driscoll eyes elite level

ONLY still new to footy Emma O’Driscoll is taking each moment as it comes and enjoying the ride despite being an overager. O’Driscoll was a late bloomer to the sport and has not put a foot wrong since her inception into the game, steadily developing and posing a dominant threat credit to her skill.

“So I only started playing footy last year, so in Year 12 – which was in 2017 – I went to school country week,” O’Driscoll said. Just a week of football at the school country week and then one of the ‘Deggers’ – Clint Degebrodt came up to me and gave me a state invitation and I thought I’ll go and try out for the state 18s and that summer I did their academy and then made it to the state 18s team last year, and then I made it again this year as an overager so that was really exciting.

The talented footballer is hoping to remain in her home state with the Eagles and Dockers both viable options considering her breakout season and connection to both clubs with the youngster receiving text messages and calls from the rival clubs throughout the WAFL season.

“I think it’s great, I think it just shows that the game is developing so much and obviously it gives us girls in WA a lot more opportunity having two teams to be able to go to,” she said. “I was part of the West Coast Eagles Academy so I was training with those girls and signed girls every Tuesday throughout the season which was great, got feedback from the coaches constantly. “Freo have been the exact same, ringing me, checking up on me if I did get injured and they were always making sure everything was all good and I was looked after which has been amazing. Both clubs were very supportive.”

Despite going for the Eagles her whole life, O’Driscoll is open to the chance of either Western Australia side to pick her up and has been inspired by a host of AFLW players along the journey.

“AFLW is a bit different, I literally support everyone, Tayla Harris is probably my favourite player so there’s a bit of Carlton there but I love the Dockers in the AFLW,” she said. “Kara ‘Juddy’ [Donnellan], she’s the captain of the Dockers, she was my Swan Districts coach at my WAFL club, she’s just been amazing, calls me ‘champ’, will message me all the time. “Checks up on me and we just have that good kind of communication going so I’ll message her if I can’t come to training and things like that, yeah she’s been a really really great help.”

Having spent a large portion of her life playing netball the switch to footy was slightly challenging for the Western Australian with the sport posing a heap of new challenges physically and mentally.

“Most importantly my kicking, was the main thing I got told to work on, fitness-wise it would be the 2km, I haven’t been used to running that long distance you know, I’ve had a 30m court that I’ve had to run on instead of a big oval so they were the main things and feedback that I got back from the coaches,” she said.

Aware of her areas of improvement O’Driscoll has toiled away to address the issues in her game play to further develop her skills and become a commanding figure on the footy field.

“I definitely think I have been working harder this year, I think because last year was my first season I was kind of settling in and getting to know everyone whereas this year I know the game a lot better so being able to implement those things at training was a lot easier for me to do and I was more familiar with the coaches,” she said. “I think I am fitter, in terms of my 2km I’ve cut my time down which was one of my major goals, not comparing myself to other people and just trying to work on my own 2km time trial so that was good. In terms of kicking I’m getting there, slowly, but I think by having more exposure to the game I’ll be able to improve that a lot more.”

Gifted with the opportunity to play for and represent Western Australia, O’Driscoll has loved every moment taking on a leadership role of sorts and injecting herself into the footy culture.

“Oh it’s been amazing, probably one of the best experiences I’ve ever had,” she said. “I think the first year it was a lot different to obviously netball, so coming over and just the footy culture is fantastic and I’ve enjoyed every minute of playing in the State 18s with the girls and I think this year being older in that team has kind of allowed me to have a leadership role which I’ve really enjoyed so yeah it’s been great,” she said.

With the league expanding and the possibility of two clubs vying for her services the 19-year-old’s main aim is to get drafted and put her best foot forward highlighting her hard work and skill across the oval.

“I think I really just want to push myself and show that I have a really good work ethic and I’m willing to work as hard as I can and kind of step up to the level of AFLW,” she said.

“Natural footballer” Vella determined to succeed

DESPITE standing at about 156cm, Geelong Falcons’ Elise Vella has a big impact every time she is out on the field thanks to her ability to think through plays quickly and move nimbly around the ground. Vella showed she is adaptable this year, playing across three different levels with Geelong and Vic Country.

“We started off with Geelong Falcons, we got in the prelim, did pretty well but unfortunately we lost,” Vella said. “From there, it was Vic Country where we lost our game to Metro but won all our games in Queensland, and from there we played a few games with Geelong VFLW club.”

Change is no problem for Vella who has a passion for Australian rules football, enjoying the team atmosphere that the code brings. That, along with her ability to evade opponents and create separation credit to her agility and speed, make it the perfect combination for a player driven to reach the highest possible heights.

“I just like playing, I just love the sport, love footy so much, love playing with my friends, it’s so nice,” Vella said. “I think because of my size, my speed is one of my strengths. “I like the agility and 20m sprint the bests. I think because I’m a smaller player I like being more agile.”

Playing for the Falcons, Vella averaged 10.6 disposals, 1.1 marks and 2.3 inside 50s per game this year, being that outside runner in transition, winning the ball in space and putting it forward for her team to hit the scoreboard. She also averaged a couple of tackles per game, showing she is capable of applying great defensive pressure as well.

Vella said she was hoping to work on her confidence and strength around the contest, something she had been developing as a member of the Rookie Me Academy. While many players might be daunted fronting up to the NAB League Fitness Testing Day in the pre-season, it was a different feeling for Vella, who knew plenty of faces with the testing day hosted by Rookie Me at Maribyrnong College.

“It’s really good to be familiar with some of the team around here when you come in,” Vella said.

The quick winger has had an impact on the Rookie Me Academy, with Head of High Performance Darcy Waugh describing Vella as a “natural footballer”.

“Elise has so much natural ability, she seems like a natural ball winner,” Waugh said. “She moves really well and just finds the ball. Despite her size, she’s an attractive prospect because of how she plays. “What I tell other people is she makes the players around her better.”

Now with her top-age year in the books, Vella is a player with a big future, whichever level it may be at, but if she is to be drafted into the AFL Women’s, Vella said she would not hold back once at a club.

“I think I can offer a great personality and put in 100 per cent effort for everything that I do,” she said.

Jolliffe bouncing back from injury

FOR Bendigo Pioneers’ Jordyn Jolliffe, it has been a rocky road to success with plenty of bumps along the way. Halted in her Aussie rules tracks as an 11-year-old, Jolliffe made the switch to netball before finding her way back to the sport.

“I started in Auskick, wasn’t really a fan of netball and most of my friends were boys,” Jolliffe said. So I started there, played until Under 11s and then I wasn’t allowed to play anymore so I went over to netball,” “Then I found out that there was a girl’s league in Swan Hill starting up close to home so jumped on board with that and started playing again. Then I got picked into the Bendigo Pioneers and it sort of escalated from there.”

While being told she could not play was a big blow, nothing could prepare Jolliffe for injury in 2018, forcing her to sit on the sidelines for the entire season.

“I had a stress fracture in my lower-back so I missed last year unfortunately,” Jolliffe said. “I wasn’t allowed to do anything, because with a stress fracture you’ve got to let it mend itself. “So I sat out for the year and missed pre-season and then at the start of the year I had to just do my own programs to try and build my fitness back before the (NAB League) season started and I got to go into the Bendigo Pioneers as an over-ager.”

With fitness something Jolliffe wanted to work on coming into 2019, she said her strengths were “probably overhead marking and my kick”.

Injury may have thrown a spanner in the works, but Jolliffe did everything in her power to bounce back despite missing pre-season. She certainly reaped the reward, earning a call-up to the Eastern Allies for the 2019 AFL Women’s Championships.

“It was very hard because obviously all the others did pre-season and to get back into it behind a bit, but that’s then just more work you have to do behind the scenes,” she said. “After the first two games it was a lot better, like game fitness, you probably can’t really train for game fitness. So the first game I struggled a little bit and then after that it was good to be back.”

“It is an awesome opportunity. I never thought I would actually get to play this carnival again after the injury but yeah, just overwhelmed with (getting) picked back into it.”

The New South Wales native from Balranald played NAB League in her junior years with Bendigo Pioneers but nominated NSW/ACT in the women’s national draft.

“(It was) a lot of travelling for me,” Jolliffe said. When I played for Bendigo that was three hours away from home and if you played in Melbourne that’s another four and a half, so always travelling, training and everything, it’s always a long distance.”

Like many, Jolliffe hopes to make it to the big stage of AFL Women’s, citing Erin Phillips as one of her influences.

“I’ve always loved Joel Selwood or Gary Ablett,” she said. But for the women, Erin Phillips. I just think I would love to be like her. “Yeah, try and make the AFL Women’s, that’d be a dream come true.”

Chapman’s unassuming rise to success

“STAND there and don’t touch the ball.”

They were the first words uttered to Geelong Falcons’ Abbey Chapman when she stepped onto a football ground for the first time. It might have been a bit abrupt and imposing had the words not come from a familiar face.

“My sister told me to stand there and don’t touch the ball so I just stood on the field and watch the ball roll past me,” Chapman said. “It’s probably not my favourite (moment), but my most memorable thing.”

Since standing there and not touching the ball on the field in her first game for Bell Park, Chapman has shot up the ranks, making it into the Geelong Falcons side and Vic Country. But it is the close bond between teammates that has kept her in the sport she loves.

“Just playing with all the girls, especially here at Falcons,” she said. “Everyone’s really nice and welcoming. “I just love playing with different girls and it’s just a great sport.”

The reliable defender admitted she was much more adept in defence, given it is where she has always played, and enjoyed.

“Mainly full-back because I guess that’s just where I mainly play, but obviously just the backline,” Chapman said. “(I’m) not good at kicking goals or anything so I stick to my backline.”

She has been working on being the best defensive player she can be, while also providing good rebound out of the back half. Chapman said her strengths vary, depending on the day.

“It kind of depends,” she said. “Because sometimes it can be my kick, I feel like I have a high and strong kick. “Sometimes marking, other days probably not, but yeah just a few things, not anything in particular. “(My improvements are) more sticking with my player. “I’m good at dropping back and going back to the square so I’m just going to try and work on sticking with my player and punching if my player is going to mark it, so just trying to stop my player from getting as much of the ball as I can.”

Chapman enjoys playing at any level and has been a reliable player inside the defensive 50, showing she has what it takes to match it with the best players from across the country.

“It’s always fun playing with a high quality of football so yeah looking forward to meeting heaps of new girls from other clubs and everything like that,” Chapman said.”

Her ultimate goal is to run out for an AFL Women’s side next year.

“Yeah if I can get there,” she said. “I’ll push myself as hard as I can and hopefully I can get to that level.”

Tarrant taking GIANT strides ahead of draft

BRENNA Tarrant is no stranger to the limelight, earning herself a spot in the AFL Women’s Under-18 All-Australian side credit to her impressive season and ball winning ability – but she did not start off playing Australian rules football. Despite encouragement from her father, Tarrant did not follow in her father’s rugby footsteps, instead initially opting for netball and dancing.

“My dad used to play Union, he played first grade Union, and he sort of thought ‘oh, she can go play Union’,” Tarrant said. “I ended up playing netball and dancing and then sort of got into AFL and a lot of kids are going to AFL too because it’s sort of a safe option over the Union and League.”

Hailing from western Sydney, Tarrant was immersed in a heavy NRL (National Rugby League) and rugby union culture with only a handful of girls opting to pick up the footy. But that tune is slowly changing with more girls making the switch to Aussie rules.

“A lot of parents are cautious about ‘oh, I don’t want my child to get hurt, don’t want them to be injured’,” Tarrant said. “I think we still cop a lot of it, especially living in that Penrith area because that’s a really big Union/League area with the Penrith Panthers being so close, so I cop it a bit at school, so there is a bit of it around – a lot of that NRL sort of competitiveness. But it is coming through a lot, it’s been really good to see that rise in AFL,” she said.

Tarrant’s love for footy runs deep with this year marking her fifth season in the system after starting her journey with her local side Penrith-Emu Plaines at the bottom of the Blue Mountains.

“Played there in their inaugural team, played against one other club just for that season and then played with them in the first Western Sydney Under 15s team,” she said. “Then got onto the Under 15s New South Wales school team, came through the Rams team for the past three years now alongside some of the other stronger girls.”

Her development has seen her earn a spot in the Eastern Allies side with Tarrant enjoying the opportunity to play against some of the elite up and coming talent and hone her own craft on the footy field.

“It’s been phenomenal,” Tarrant said. “It’s definitely boosted my skills, playing alongside Tasmania and playing against Tasmania, all the coaching, it’s just been the best learning experience and playing with the best from two different states has definitely improved my skills and the skills of everyone else because we’re so united and we (bonded) really quickly as well.”

Having spent a large chunk of time playing in the defence end for netball, Tarrant has been able to transfer some of her skills onto the footy field, labelling marking as one of her strengths.

“I like to think that I’m a good marking target,” Tarrant said. “I used to do quite a bit of netball as a defensive player, I’ve only just started playing forward lately so I’ve worked a lot on my marking and getting down cleanly off the ground and that’s sort of a few good strengths of mine. “I like to think I’m a good tackler as well, run and carry is still one to work on, marking and (those) clean skills.”

Growing up in New South Wales, the 17-year-old models a lot of her play off the likes of Swans forward Isaac Heeney while also drawing inspiration from Christian Petracca and AFL Women’s player Alyce Parker.

“I played with Alyce for the last two years in Rams and Allies and she’s led the team really well, she’s been strong and her skills are really good too,” Tarrant said. “I just sort of looked up to her leadership and her skills.”

Tarrant seemed unfazed by the travel despite having to journey around the state to get to training and games.

“I have had to travel 45 minutes to get to training and then I’m sort of training on with the Giants’ team – that’s a bit of a trek out to Homebush from where I am. It is a little bit of a drive but it’s definitely not as far as some of the other girls who have to travel three-plus hours to get to training,” she said.

With commitments to the GIANTS, the defender is kept quite busy managing training schedules and is loving the opportunity to be surrounded by AFLW players.

“So a lot of them like Alicia Eva, Parker, Louise Stephenson are all around that training and they really get around all us new girls who have been invited into it. So we get a lot of help, encouragement and support from those girls and they really have helped us improve our skills,” Tarrant said.

Eva has had a huge influence on Tarrant given her coaching role as well as on-field impact, helping to guide her through the stages and further enhance her skills.

“She still takes on that coaching role even when she’s training because she’s the vice-captain, she sort of has to take on that coaching role,” she said.

But like many aspiring footballers the the ultimate goal for Tarrant is to get drafted and play at the elite level whether it be in her home state or elsewhere.

“Getting drafted and playing for the GIANTS or any team would be probably my main goal,” she said.

Postlethwaite thrives with captaincy

AFTER overcoming an ankle injury leading up to her bottom-age championships, Brisbane Lions Academy member, Lily Postlethwaite continues to take her footy to the next level with the 18-year-old loving every moment of her journey so far. Draft Central spoke to her last year regarding how her love for footy blossomed and what she endured to overcome her injury.

Awarded the Queensland captaincy, Postlethwaite was not overawed by the added responsibility standing up to the occasion throughout the Championships and showcasing her elite talent through the midfield with her daring style of play, quick hands and good vision across the ground.

“(Captaining Queensland) is a real honour for me, I’ve loved leading the group this year and it’s been a great experience for me,” she said. “Sometimes you forget about yourself when you’re trying to make sure everyone else is up but it’s all part of the challenge and I’m really enjoying it so far.”

Postlethwaite has enjoyed a continuous ride to the top with the dynamic midfielder rewarded for her efforts on the field making it into the Winter Series team and playing with a host of AFLW stars.

“On the footy side of things my game has improved a lot… I’ve made the Winter Series team which has given me great experience with lots of AFLW players which has been great so just learning off them which has been really good,” she said.

The up-and-coming midfielder has relished the opportunity to play with the experienced girls, absorbing every bit of knowledge and applying it to her own game.

“It’s really good,” she said. “All the girls are so welcoming and you just learn so much off them and it’s just that next step that shows you where you’re at I guess, if you’re up for it or not.”

Despite all the accolades and chances to develop her skills at a higher level, Postlethwaite is still well aware of the improvements needed to make it to the top tier.

“Probably just play consistent footy and don’t drop below, like to always keep improving I guess and to not be set like ‘I’m good now’, you’ve always just got to keep getting better,” she said. “I’ve always got to keep improving.”

Although Postlethwaite does not have a particular inspiration she has a multitude of players that have helped guide and develop her throughout her budding career which she attributes a great deal of her success to.

“Probably some of the girls that were in this (Queensland) team last year like Jade Ellenger and Nat Grider, they’ve been great,” she said. They just welcome you so much, make you feel comfortable and everything like that. And then I’m probably learning off players like Emily Bates, she’s just a great player.”

Not only have they inspired her on-field with their courageous actions, clever game play and skill but so too off field with their training regime and dedication.

“For sure, the off-field side like the professionalism, your (rehabilitation), your recovery and everything like that – you just watch them and it’s really important,” she said.

When looking closer to home, it is her parents that have played a major role in her success and development with Postlethwaite noting their influence and commitment to fulfilling her footy dreams.

“Mum and Dad are really good, they’re always there for me which is really good and keeps me going,” she said.